• WANTED: Happy members who like to discuss audio and other topics related to our interest. Desire to learn and share knowledge of science required. There are many reviews of audio hardware and expert members to help answer your questions. Click here to have your audio equipment measured for free!

DIYSG HTM-12v1 Speaker Review

MZKM

Major Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Dec 1, 2018
Messages
4,250
Likes
11,551
Location
Land O’ Lakes, FL
The HTM-12v1 is a 2-way loudspeaker featuring a SEOS-15 waveguide with Denovo DNA-325 and an Eminence Deltalite 12-inch woofer. (These specific parts could be different model numbers; this was the best information I could find and I will update this section if necessary).

A kit for a single speaker (including everything sans enclosure; except for front baffle) was approximately $330 (I think).
I used Wayback Machine:
http://web.archive.org/web/20180128185523/https://www.diysoundgroup.com/htm-12-kit.html

$30 cheaper than current model and 1dB higher rated sensitivty.


New version uses:
  • Celestion CDX1-1742 tweeter
  • Denovo 12" Hyperlite
  • Lower crossover point (1250Hz vs 1400Hz)
 

johnp98

Active Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2021
Messages
134
Likes
201
To that end, is there an AVR/AVP that will let you apply manual PEQ to a full surround set? I suppose you could just let Audyssey/Dirac/ARC do it's thing full range on these, but I imagine PEQ based on anechoic LW would be better.

I assume it is best to use these measurements for PEQ generation rather than in room Dirac or Audyssey eh?

Man I really want the new version measured! Any chance the v2 will get measured?
 
Last edited:

richard12511

Major Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Jan 23, 2020
Messages
4,335
Likes
6,702
To that end, is there an AVR/AVP that will let you apply manual PEQ to a full surround set? I suppose you could just let Audyssey/Dirac/ARC do it's thing full range on these, but I imagine PEQ based on anechoic LW would be better.

I've been trying to get Audiolense to do multichannel room correction over HDMI and ASIO for my 11 channels, but so far have had no success. Theoretically, it should work with ASIO, or maybe HDMI 2.1?
 

Dj7675

Major Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Jan 12, 2019
Messages
2,140
Likes
2,809
@Maiky76 it would be interesting to know how this speaker rates with EQ. It would seem it would do very well with EQ.
 

Maiky76

Senior Member
Joined
May 28, 2020
Messages
444
Likes
3,744
Location
French, living in China
This is copy/pasted from my website. Therefore, there may be some formatting things that go awry when pasted here. Feel free to view the review natively on my site linked below. Otherwise, enjoy it here!
https://www.erinsaudiocorner.com/loudspeakers/diysg_htm12v1/



DIYSG HTM-12v1 Speaker Review
  • Tuesday, May 18, 2021
DSC01917.JPG

Foreword / YouTube Video Review
The review on this website is a brief overview and summary of the objective performance of this speaker. It is not intended to be a deep dive. Moreso, this is information for those who prefer “just the facts” and prefer to have the data without the filler.
However, for those who want more - a detailed explanation of the objective performance, and my subjective evaluation (what I heard, what I liked, etc.) - please watch the below video where I go more in-depth.



Information and Photos
The DIYSG HTM-12v1 is a DIY design from Matt Grant which was/is available in kit form from DIYSG.

Note the distinction of this model is “v1” as there has since been an update to this speaker design which was released in early 2020. Therefore, this review is more for educational purposes and hopefully will help users and designers alike understand the objective performance in the highest resolution possible as current available measurements are a mixture of quasi-anechoic methods and thus have low resolution / high smoothing, insufficient to show problematic areas where anechoic measurements excel.

The HTM-12v1 is a 2-way loudspeaker featuring a SEOS-15 waveguide with Denovo DNA-325 and an Eminence Deltalite 12-inch woofer. (These specific parts could be different model numbers; this was the best information I could find and I will update this section if necessary).

A kit for a single speaker (including everything sans enclosure; except for front baffle) was approximately $330 (I think).

These speakers were loaned to me by their owner, who built them from the kit. There are no physical or electro-mechanical issues and this unit is a good sample, representative of what one would ideally build from the kit.

DSC01935.JPG


DSC01936.JPG


DSC01940.JPG





CTA-2034 (SPINORAMA) and Accompanying Data
All data collected using Klippel’s Near-Field Scanner. The Near-Field-Scanner 3D (NFS) offers a fully automated acoustic measurement of direct sound radiated from the source under test. The radiated sound is determined in any desired distance and angle in the 3D space outside the scanning surface. Directivity, sound power, SPL response and many more key figures are obtained for any kind of loudspeaker and audio system in near field applications (e.g. studio monitors, mobile devices) as well as far field applications (e.g. professional audio systems). Utilizing a minimum of measurement points, a comprehensive data set is generated containing the loudspeaker’s high resolution, free field sound radiation in the near and far field. For a detailed explanation of how the NFS works and the science behind it, please watch the below discussion with designer Christian Bellmann:


The reference plane in this test is just below the tweeter, per the designer, Matt.

Measurements are provided in a format in accordance with the Standard Method of Measurement for In-Home Loudspeakers (ANSI/CTA-2034-A R-2020). For more information, please see this link.

CTA-2034 / SPINORAMA:
CEA2034%20--%20DIYSG%20HTM-12%20v1.png



Early Reflections Breakout:
Early%20Reflections.png


Estimated In-Room Response:
Estimated%20In-Room%20Response.png


Horizontal Frequency Response (0° to ±90°):
SPL%20Horizontal.png


Vertical Frequency Response (0° to ±40°):
SPL%20Vertical.png


Horizontal Contour Plot (not normalized):
DIYSG%20HTM-12%20v1_Horizontal_Spectrogram_Full.png


Horizontal Contour Plot (normalized):
DIYSG%20HTM-12%20v1%20Beamwidth_Horizontal.png


Vertical Contour Plot (not normalized):
DIYSG%20HTM-12%20v1_Vertical_Spectrogram_Full.png


Vertical Contour Plot (normalized):
DIYSG%20HTM-12%20v1%20Beamwidth_Vertical.png




Additional Measurements

Impedance Magnitude and Phase + Equivalent Peak Dissipation Resistance (EPDR)

For those who do not know what EPDR is (ahem, me until 2020), Keith Howard came up with this metric which he defined in a 2007 article for Stereophile as:
… simply the resistive load that would give rise to the same peak device dissipation as the speaker itself.​
A note from Dr. Jack Oclee-Brown of JBL (who supplied the formula for calculating EPDR):
Just a note of caution that the EPDR derivation is based on a class-B output stage so it’s valid for typical class-AB amps but certainly not for class-A and probably has only marginal relevance for class-D amps (would love to hear from a class-D expert on this topic).​
DIYSG%20HTM-12%20v1_Impedance_0.1v.png

On-Axis Response Linearity
DIYSG%20HTM-12%20v1%20FR_Linearity.png

“Globe” Plots
These plots are generated from exporting the Klippel data to text files. I then process that data with my own MATLAB script to provide what you see. These are not part of any software packages and are unique to my tests.
Horizontal Polar (Globe) Plot:
This represents the sound field at 2 meters - above 200Hz - per the legend in the upper left.
DIYSG%20HTM-12%20v1_360_Horizontal_Polar.png



Vertical Polar (Globe) Plot:
This represents the sound field at 2 meters - above 200Hz - per the legend in the upper left.
DIYSG%20HTM-12%20v1_360_Vertical_Polar.png



Harmonic Distortion
Harmonic Distortion at 86dB @ 1m:
DIYSG%20HTM-12%20v1%20Harmonic%20Distortion%20%2886dB%20%40%201m%29.png


Harmonic Distortion at 96dB @ 1m:
DIYSG%20HTM-12%20v1%20Harmonic%20Distortion%20%2896dB%20%40%201m%29.png


Harmonic Distortion at 102dB @ 1m:
DIYSG%20HTM-12%20v1%20Harmonic%20Distortion%20%28102dB%20%40%201m%29.png


Near-Field Response
Nearfield response of individual drive units:
DIYSG%20HTM-12v1%20Nearfield%20Component%20Measurements.png



Dynamic Range (Instantaneous Compression Test)
The below graphic indicates just how much SPL is lost (compression) or gained (enhancement; usually due to distortion) when the speaker is played at higher output volumes instantly via a 2.7 second logarithmic sine sweep referenced to 76dB at 1 meter. The signals are played consecutively without any additional stimulus applied. Then normalized against the 76dB result.
The tests are conducted in this fashion:
  1. 76dB at 1 meter (baseline; black)
  2. 86dB at 1 meter (red)
  3. 96dB at 1 meter (blue)
  4. 102dB at 1 meter (purple)
The purpose of this test is to illustrate how much (if at all) the output changes as a speaker’s components temperature increases (i.e., voice coils, crossover components) instantaneously.
DIYSG%20HTM-12%20v1_Compression.png




Long Term Compression Tests
The below graphics indicate how much SPL is lost or gained in the long-term as a speaker plays at the same output level for 2 minutes, in intervals. Each graphic represents a different SPL: 86dB and 96dB both at 1 meter.
The purpose of this test is to illustrate how much (if at all) the output changes as a speaker’s components temperature increases (i.e., voice coils, crossover components).
The tests are conducted in this fashion:
  1. “Cold” logarithmic sine sweep (no stimulus applied beforehand)
  2. Multitone stimulus played at desired SPL/distance for 2 minutes; intended to represent music signal
  3. Interim logarithmic sine sweep (no stimulus applied beforehand) (Red in graphic)
  4. Multitone stimulus played at desired SPL/distance for 2 minutes; intended to represent music signal
  5. Final logarithmic sine sweep (no stimulus applied beforehand) (Blue in graphic)
The red and blue lines represent changes in the output compared to the initial “cold” test.
DIYSG%20HTM-12%20v1_Long_Term_86_Compression.png

DIYSG%20HTM-12%20v1_Long_Term_96_Compression.png






Parting / Random Thoughts
If you want to see the music I use for evaluating speakers subjectively, see my Spotify playlist.
  • Subjective listening was mainly in the farfield at 3-4 meters in an open floorplan living room. Subjective listening was conducted at 80-95dB at these distances and occasionally higher. Higher volumes were done simply to test the output capability in case one wants to try to sit further away.
  • Toy Soldiers - Resonant in the 150Hz region, her voice pops through the mix ~1kHz.
  • Enjoy the Silence - Missing attack, vocals are a bit “behind” the mix; likely something in the 3kHz area.
  • Higher Love - Missing that strong snare attack that I really like about this track.
  • Soundstage drifts in width; i.e., “Magic” by The Cars has a mouth sound that should be on the left outside but instead is at two distinct spaces on the left; how does this match with the radiation pattern? Is the radiation uniform? Sounds varied. Looking back at the radiation pattern, this makes sense as you can see the radiation tends to shift in angle. For example, at 300Hz the radiation pattern is about 20° wider than at 500Hz before getting wider again at 800Hz to 1.3kHz and then narrowing another 20° above this and narrowing up until approximately 9kHz. This varying radiation pattern in my incredibly subjective opinion causes the soundstage to not remain consistent, meaning that if an instrument or vocal is at one place in the soundstage for the fundamental, it will be at a different location for the harmonic(s). YMMV.
  • Sensitivity averages around 94dB @ 2.83v/1m.
  • Obviously with an f3 of 78Hz and f10 of 53Hz, these speakers do need a subwoofer. Without the addition of a subwoofer you will find lack of fullness to tracks with low midbass (50-60Hz kickdrums, for example).
  • Distortion and compression are incredibly low. In fact, the lowest I’ve measured to date, besting the $3000/pair Klipsch Heresy IV.
  • No problem getting very, very loud in my large living room.
  • Voices don’t sound natural; FR is quite varied and some intelligibility is lost due to the 3kHz suck out.


Support / Donate

If you like what you see here and want to help me keep it going, please consider donating via the PayPal Contribute link here. Donations help me pay for new items to test, hardware, miscellaneous items and costs of the site’s server space and bandwidth. All of which I otherwise pay out of pocket. And, truthfully speaking, help me buy lunch and maybe take my wife and kid out for dinner now and again in an effort to “apologize” for spending so much time in the garage testing all these speakers. So, if you can help chip in a few bucks, know that it is very much appreciated. Alternatively, you can use the affiliate link on my site if you want to purchase these.

You can also join my Facebook and YouTube pages if you would like to follow along with updates.

Hi,

Here is my take on the EQ.

The raw data with corrected ER and PIR:

Score no EQ: 0.6
With Sub: 5.1

Spinorama with no EQ:
  • Not even close to flat.
  • You really need the SPL to buy/build these speakers
  • Strange trough at LF
  • Passive Cross over can only do so much with this type of speakers
DIYSG HTM-12v1 No EQ Spinorama.png

Directivity:
Great Horizontal directivity
Better stay at tweeter height
Horizontally, better toe-in or no toe in at close but close, to be 10/20deg off- axis
DIYSG HTM-12v1 2D surface Directivity Contour Only Data.png

DIYSG HTM-12v1 LW Better data.png

EQ design:

I have generated One EQs. The APO config file is attached.
  • LW EQ very similar to Score so one will do
  • Awful lot to EQ
  • Did not boost LF as the are obviously tuned for use with a sub.
  • Not quite sure about the mid/HF if you use them in an heavily damped HT
  • there are a few significant boosts in the EQ. Please make sure the preamp gains are correct or you'll damage your speakers. You have been warned.

Score EQ Score: 5.1
with sub: 7.8

Code:
DIYSG HTM-12v1 APO EQ LW-Score 96000Hz
May242021-122106

Preamp: -4.3 dB

Filter 1: ON HPQ Fc 67.5 Hz Gain 0 dB Q 1.15
Filter 2: ON PK Fc 115 Hz Gain -1.5 dB Q 0.66
Filter 3: ON PK Fc 157 Hz Gain 3.57 dB Q 2.09
Filter 4: ON PK Fc 548 Hz Gain -2.25 dB Q 1.17
Filter 5: ON PK Fc 671 Hz Gain 2.77 dB Q 4.08
Filter 6: ON PK Fc 900 Hz Gain -1 dB Q 5.5
Filter 7: ON PK Fc 1122 Hz Gain -2.51 dB Q 6
Filter 8: ON PK Fc 2985 Hz Gain 4.45 dB Q 3.37
Filter 9: ON PK Fc 5794 Hz Gain 1.69 dB Q 3.07
Filter 10: ON PK Fc 8336 Hz Gain -1.71 dB Q 1.17
Filter 11: ON PK Fc 13455 Hz Gain -2 dB Q 7.84
Filter 12: ON PK Fc 17737 Hz Gain -5.35 dB Q 6.84

DIYSG HTM-12v1 EQ Design.png


Spinorama EQ Score
DIYSG HTM-12v1 LW-Score EQ Spinorama.png


Zoom PIR-LW-ON
DIYSG HTM-12v1 Zoom.png


Regression - Tonal
DIYSG HTM-12v1 Regression - Tonal.png


Radar no EQ vs EQ score
Huge improvements but very low starting point...
DIYSG HTM-12v1 Radar.png


The rest of the plots is attached.
 

Attachments

  • DIYSG HTM-12v1 APO EQ LW-Score 96000Hz.txt
    632 bytes · Views: 79
  • DIYSG HTM-12v1 3D surface Vertical Directivity Data.png
    DIYSG HTM-12v1 3D surface Vertical Directivity Data.png
    434.9 KB · Views: 79
  • DIYSG HTM-12v1 3D surface Horizontal Directivity Data.png
    DIYSG HTM-12v1 3D surface Horizontal Directivity Data.png
    445.8 KB · Views: 83
  • DIYSG HTM-12v1 2D surface Directivity Contour Data.png
    DIYSG HTM-12v1 2D surface Directivity Contour Data.png
    305.9 KB · Views: 94
  • DIYSG HTM-12v1 Normalized Directivity data.png
    DIYSG HTM-12v1 Normalized Directivity data.png
    483.8 KB · Views: 82
  • DIYSG HTM-12v1 Raw Directivity data.png
    DIYSG HTM-12v1 Raw Directivity data.png
    872.9 KB · Views: 69
  • DIYSG HTM-12v1 Reflexion data.png
    DIYSG HTM-12v1 Reflexion data.png
    276.6 KB · Views: 88
  • DIYSG HTM-12v1 LW data.png
    DIYSG HTM-12v1 LW data.png
    286.4 KB · Views: 75

mtg90

Member
Joined
May 24, 2021
Messages
56
Likes
141
Location
Illinois
I think it's great jcmccorm was able to get a set to Erin to test and I value all the data which is far beyond what I can easily collect myself.

I posted a couple of my thoughts on another forum but will share them here.

If you don't already know these were designed primarily for screen wall installation, voiced for near/in wall mounting there isn't full BSC applied which is why you see the drop below 200hz.

There is normally a dip around 3k but it was small. I certainly didn't design it with such a trough in the 2-6k range. I suspect the the response of the batch of compression drivers shipped with the speakers measured here differs from the original ones I used for the design, namely the lower output between 2-6k & more of a peak at the top end.

I pulled mine out and tested it again tonight to double check this.

Measured on a stand out in the middle of a room and gated the response 200hz to ~1.3-1.4k overlays nearly perfectly with Erin's data but the response of the compression driver deviates quite a bit from what I had originally intended and designed for which is certainly disappointing for me to see.

HTM-12 v1 measuemernts 5-23-21 (just 1m) vs Erin on axis.png
 

Ilkless

Major Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Jan 26, 2019
Messages
1,769
Likes
3,489
Location
Singapore
Beautiful directivity, with relatively little raggedness for a compression driver. Yet, even a decade after SEOS has come out, there is no large horn/waveguide speaker that approaches this performance and can be readily purchased at retail. This is what the Klipsch Heresy ought to be, and as their newer small speakers show, they are capable of engineering.
 

Biblob

Addicted to Fun and Learning
Joined
Sep 13, 2018
Messages
635
Likes
603
@hardisj would or be possible for uppity to listen to the speaker with the EQ @Maiky76 made? The difference should be enormous to the sound. It would be a fun experiment :)
 

thewas

Master Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Jan 15, 2020
Messages
6,867
Likes
16,821
Beautiful directivity, with relatively little raggedness for a compression driver. Yet, even a decade after SEOS has come out, there is no large horn/waveguide speaker that approaches this performance and can be readily purchased at retail. This is what the Klipsch Heresy ought to be, and as their newer small speakers show, they are capable of engineering.
Here is another such DIY design with even better vertical directivity, unfortunately also not to be readily purchased at retail, maybe an idea for a startup? ;)
http://hannover-hardcore.de/infinity_classics/!!!/Messungen eines Heimkinolautsprecherprototyps.pdf
I used to own the (also not bad) Menhir-S it is here compared to
http://hannover-hardcore.de/infinity_classics/!!!/Messung Forumbox und Menhir-S.pdf
 

Scgorg

Active Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2020
Messages
129
Likes
423
Location
Norway
Thanks for another great review Erin!
Couldn't help but notice you mentioned Jack Oclee-Brown from JBL, when it's supposed to be from KEF (the part where you mention EDPR).
 

Severian

Active Member
Forum Donor
Joined
Jan 11, 2019
Messages
220
Likes
206
Thanks for the review. I have been planning on building a pair of the revised version eventually. I use a pair of Matt's Vortex-15s in a stereo setup and they are incredible speakers.
 

beaRA

Active Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2021
Messages
223
Likes
315
I think it's great jcmccorm was able to get a set to Erin to test and I value all the data which is far beyond what I can easily collect myself.

I posted a couple of my thoughts on another forum but will share them here.

If you don't already know these were designed primarily for screen wall installation, voiced for near/in wall mounting there isn't full BSC applied which is why you see the drop below 200hz.

There is normally a dip around 3k but it was small. I certainly didn't design it with such a trough in the 2-6k range. I suspect the the response of the batch of compression drivers shipped with the speakers measured here differs from the original ones I used for the design, namely the lower output between 2-6k & more of a peak at the top end.

I pulled mine out and tested it again tonight to double check this.

Measured on a stand out in the middle of a room and gated the response 200hz to ~1.3-1.4k overlays nearly perfectly with Erin's data but the response of the compression driver deviates quite a bit from what I had originally intended and designed for which is certainly disappointing for me to see.

View attachment 131698
How do you feel the consistency of the updated drivers would compare to this v1 compression driver?
 
OP
hardisj

hardisj

Major Contributor
Reviewer
Joined
Jul 18, 2019
Messages
2,907
Likes
13,914
Location
North Alabama
Someone on AVS asked about testing v2, so I am copy/pasting that bit from there to here...


If I can use the same cabs and the only difference is drivers and crossover, and if the owner doesn't mind, and if @mtg90 would be willing..

If @mtg90 can send the updated parts to me, I can swap them out and test and we can have full data for the v2 speaker.

If that is a no go, then if someone wants to send me their v2 I will test it. But sending a big speaker like that isn't going to be cheap.
 

abdo123

Master Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Nov 15, 2020
Messages
7,444
Likes
7,954
Location
Brussels, Belgium
Hi,

Here is my take on the EQ.

The raw data with corrected ER and PIR:

Score no EQ: 0.6
With Sub: 5.1

Spinorama with no EQ:
  • Not even close to flat.
  • You really need the SPL to buy/build these speakers
  • Strange trough at LF
  • Passive Cross over can only do so much with this type of speakers
View attachment 131674
Directivity:
Great Horizontal directivity
Better stay at tweeter height
Horizontally, better toe-in or no toe in at close but close, to be 10/20deg off- axis
View attachment 131675
View attachment 131679
EQ design:

I have generated One EQs. The APO config file is attached.
  • LW EQ very similar to Score so one will do
  • Awful lot to EQ
  • Did not boost LF as the are obviously tuned for use with a sub.
  • Not quite sure about the mid/HF if you use them in an heavily damped HT
  • there are a few significant boosts in the EQ. Please make sure the preamp gains are correct or you'll damage your speakers. You have been warned.

Score EQ Score: 5.1
with sub: 7.8

Code:
DIYSG HTM-12v1 APO EQ LW-Score 96000Hz
May242021-122106

Preamp: -4.3 dB

Filter 1: ON HPQ Fc 67.5 Hz Gain 0 dB Q 1.15
Filter 2: ON PK Fc 115 Hz Gain -1.5 dB Q 0.66
Filter 3: ON PK Fc 157 Hz Gain 3.57 dB Q 2.09
Filter 4: ON PK Fc 548 Hz Gain -2.25 dB Q 1.17
Filter 5: ON PK Fc 671 Hz Gain 2.77 dB Q 4.08
Filter 6: ON PK Fc 900 Hz Gain -1 dB Q 5.5
Filter 7: ON PK Fc 1122 Hz Gain -2.51 dB Q 6
Filter 8: ON PK Fc 2985 Hz Gain 4.45 dB Q 3.37
Filter 9: ON PK Fc 5794 Hz Gain 1.69 dB Q 3.07
Filter 10: ON PK Fc 8336 Hz Gain -1.71 dB Q 1.17
Filter 11: ON PK Fc 13455 Hz Gain -2 dB Q 7.84
Filter 12: ON PK Fc 17737 Hz Gain -5.35 dB Q 6.84

View attachment 131673

Spinorama EQ Score
View attachment 131668

Zoom PIR-LW-ON
View attachment 131672

Regression - Tonal
View attachment 131671

Radar no EQ vs EQ score
Huge improvements but very low starting point...
View attachment 131670

The rest of the plots is attached.

btw this is not the first time your algorithim is producing filters with 0 dB gain, is this behavior intentional? should be very easy to fix.
 

tomtoo

Major Contributor
Joined
Nov 20, 2019
Messages
3,708
Likes
4,770
Location
Germany
This is basically what I expected from these. So many people talk about these and the other variations and always seem to talk about how loud they can go but does it really matter that a speaker can play at 120 db if it sounds like crap lol? I say focus on sound quality /neutrality before worrying about a speaker playing at 120 db...

Its not the best speaker for the fainted heard extrem serious hifi listener. But looks like a great speaker/buck for lets call it power hifi. Let the party basement rumble, and still have good sound. Not for everybody, but i can absolutly understand if some people like.
 

Ilkless

Major Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Jan 26, 2019
Messages
1,769
Likes
3,489
Location
Singapore
Here is another such DIY design with even better vertical directivity, unfortunately also not to be readily purchased at retail, maybe an idea for a startup? ;)
http://hannover-hardcore.de/infinity_classics/!!!/Messungen eines Heimkinolautsprecherprototyps.pdf
I used to own the (also not bad) Menhir-S it is here compared to
http://hannover-hardcore.de/infinity_classics/!!!/Messung Forumbox und Menhir-S.pdf

https://www.lenhifi.de/app/download/10391528571/Horns_LP219screen.pdf?t=1576856910

https://www.lenhifi.de/app/download/10176928171/AUDIO_Test_hORNS_FP_10.pdf?t=1598942182

Unfortunately the commercial SEOS designs that exist leave a lot to be desired.
 

Ericglo

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2020
Messages
452
Likes
323
Its not the best speaker for the fainted heard extrem serious hifi listener. But looks like a great speaker/buck for lets call it power hifi. Let the party basement rumble, and still have good sound. Not for everybody, but i can absolutly understand if some people like.

I like the "power hifi" moniker, but I thought this was designed first for home theater. As such, it should be sensitive, low distortion and have good speech intelligibility.
 

Steve Dallas

Major Contributor
Joined
May 28, 2020
Messages
1,215
Likes
2,908
Location
A Whole Other Country
To that end, is there an AVR/AVP that will let you apply manual PEQ to a full surround set? I suppose you could just let Audyssey/Dirac/ARC do it's thing full range on these, but I imagine PEQ based on anechoic LW would be better.

Yes. Yamaha AVRs have a user accessible 6 or 7 band PEQ per channel.
 
Top Bottom