• WANTED: Happy members who like to discuss audio and other topics related to our interest. Desire to learn and share knowledge of science required. There are many reviews of audio hardware and expert members to help answer your questions. Click here to have your audio equipment measured for free!

DIYSG HTM-12v1 Speaker Review

tomtoo

Major Contributor
Joined
Nov 20, 2019
Messages
3,713
Likes
4,779
Location
Germany
I like the "power hifi" moniker, but I thought this was designed first for home theater. As such, it should be sensitive, low distortion and have good speech intelligibility.

Absolutly ok.
 

beaRA

Active Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2021
Messages
223
Likes
315
Yes. Yamaha AVRs have a user accessible 6 or 7 band PEQ per channel.
Unless the newer versions are better, the manual PEQ on my RX-A760 is far too limited. You only get 7 bands (the PEQ from @Maiky76 requires 11), 3 of the bands can't be used below 500Hz, frequencies can only be selected in 1/3rd octave intervals, Q values are not precise, only 0.5 dB gain steps.
 

beaRA

Active Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2021
Messages
223
Likes
315
I certainly hope they are more consistent, it's one of the reasons we moved away from the Chinese clone compression drivers to name brand compression drivers.
A change in supplier seems like reason enough to have more confidence. I'd love to see the new version Klippel tested!
 

Absolute

Major Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Feb 5, 2017
Messages
1,085
Likes
2,131
Wow, there's real potential in this thing! What a nice waveguide!
 

johnp98

Active Member
Joined
Jan 29, 2021
Messages
134
Likes
201
If @mtg90 can send the updated parts to me, I can swap them out and test and we can have full data for the v2 speaker.

If that is a no go, then if someone wants to send me their v2 I will test it. But sending a big speaker like that isn't going to be cheap.

If no one is able to sent the v2 components then I could potentially take the crossover and woofer and compression driver out of mine and then send them to you. The down side is that I live in Canada so it would cost a bit more and probably take a bit longer to arrive.

Alternatively I would be willing to financially pitch in if someone else was closer or someone had a better idea.
 

Maiky76

Senior Member
Joined
May 28, 2020
Messages
444
Likes
3,745
Location
French, living in China
btw this is not the first time your algorithim is producing filters with 0 dB gain, is this behavior intentional? should be very easy to fix.

What are referring to?

Code:
DIYSG HTM-12v1 APO EQ LW-Score 96000Hz
May242021-122106

Preamp: -4.3 dB

Filter 1: ON HPQ Fc 67.5 Hz Gain 0 dB Q 1.15 -> type is HPQ not PK
Filter 2: ON PK Fc 115 Hz Gain -1.5 dB Q 0.66
Filter 3: ON PK Fc 157 Hz Gain 3.57 dB Q 2.09
Filter 4: ON PK Fc 548 Hz Gain -2.25 dB Q 1.17
Filter 5: ON PK Fc 671 Hz Gain 2.77 dB Q 4.08
Filter 6: ON PK Fc 900 Hz Gain -1 dB Q 5.5
Filter 7: ON PK Fc 1122 Hz Gain -2.51 dB Q 6
Filter 8: ON PK Fc 2985 Hz Gain 4.45 dB Q 3.37
Filter 9: ON PK Fc 5794 Hz Gain 1.69 dB Q 3.07
Filter 10: ON PK Fc 8336 Hz Gain -1.71 dB Q 1.17
Filter 11: ON PK Fc 13455 Hz Gain -2 dB Q 7.84
Filter 12: ON PK Fc 17737 Hz Gain -5.35 dB Q 6.84

I always use 0dB gain for the HPQ when I use one.
The HPQ type is High-Pass filter with arbitrary Q as opposed to Butterworth, Chebychev, Linkwitz–Riley etc.
Adding a gain there would result in a gain applied to the whole cascaded filter which is not necessary since I also compute the Preamp gain.

Have a look there for the definition of the biquads:
https://sourceforge.net/p/equalizerapo/wiki/Configuration reference/

Usually the two first filters are used to
- Shape the LF response (obviously) and maximize the output within the bandwidth of the speaker
- Remove the bump around 100Hz very often present
- Protect the speaker from over-execution below the tuning frequency (ported speakers)
 

jhaider

Major Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Jun 5, 2016
Messages
2,868
Likes
4,660
To that end, is there an AVR/AVP that will let you apply manual PEQ to a full surround set?

Monoprice HTP-1.

IMO the SEOS horn design really shines in the normalized polars. That's a huge credit to the DIY community's engineering chops. IMO the trick is to find a compression driver that's as smooth as possible to minimize the manipulations required. I don't suppose there's a 1" exit JBL ring radiator with Voishvillo's phase plug? Tymphany and SB Acoustics have gotten into the compression driver market. Maybe they have a more "hifi" sensibility of prioritizing smoother (never going to get smooth from a compression driver on a horn) response over performance venue filling SPL?
 

abdo123

Master Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Nov 15, 2020
Messages
7,444
Likes
7,954
Location
Brussels, Belgium
What are referring to?

Code:
DIYSG HTM-12v1 APO EQ LW-Score 96000Hz
May242021-122106

Preamp: -4.3 dB

Filter 1: ON HPQ Fc 67.5 Hz Gain 0 dB Q 1.15 -> type is HPQ not PK
Filter 2: ON PK Fc 115 Hz Gain -1.5 dB Q 0.66
Filter 3: ON PK Fc 157 Hz Gain 3.57 dB Q 2.09
Filter 4: ON PK Fc 548 Hz Gain -2.25 dB Q 1.17
Filter 5: ON PK Fc 671 Hz Gain 2.77 dB Q 4.08
Filter 6: ON PK Fc 900 Hz Gain -1 dB Q 5.5
Filter 7: ON PK Fc 1122 Hz Gain -2.51 dB Q 6
Filter 8: ON PK Fc 2985 Hz Gain 4.45 dB Q 3.37
Filter 9: ON PK Fc 5794 Hz Gain 1.69 dB Q 3.07
Filter 10: ON PK Fc 8336 Hz Gain -1.71 dB Q 1.17
Filter 11: ON PK Fc 13455 Hz Gain -2 dB Q 7.84
Filter 12: ON PK Fc 17737 Hz Gain -5.35 dB Q 6.84

I always use 0dB gain for the HPQ when I use one.
The HPQ type is High-Pass filter with arbitrary Q as opposed to Butterworth, Chebychev, Linkwitz–Riley etc.
Adding a gain there would result in a gain applied to the whole cascaded filter which is not necessary since I also compute the Preamp gain.

Have a look there for the definition of the biquads:
https://sourceforge.net/p/equalizerapo/wiki/Configuration reference/

Usually the two first filters are used to
- Shape the LF response (obviously) and maximize the output within the bandwidth of the speaker
- Remove the bump around 100Hz very often present
- Protect the speaker from over-execution below the tuning frequency (ported speakers)

Aah sorry i just noticed it’s a highpass filter :facepalm: my bad.
 

beaRA

Active Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2021
Messages
223
Likes
315
Monoprice HTP-1.

IMO the SEOS horn design really shines in the normalized polars. That's a huge credit to the DIY community's engineering chops. IMO the trick is to find a compression driver that's as smooth as possible to minimize the manipulations required. I don't suppose there's a 1" exit JBL ring radiator with Voishvillo's phase plug? Tymphany and SB Acoustics have gotten into the compression driver market. Maybe they have a more "hifi" sensibility of prioritizing smoother (never going to get smooth from a compression driver on a horn) response over performance venue filling SPL?
Thanks, that would do it. Not sure about the value proposition of a $4000 processor and a compete set of separate amps to enable anechoic correction of a $300 speaker. I guess you could go Denon X3700H and use all the pre-outs to a miniDSP 10x10 HD for about half the price.
 

changer

Addicted to Fun and Learning
Joined
Dec 4, 2020
Messages
559
Likes
602
Monoprice HTP-1.

IMO the SEOS horn design really shines in the normalized polars. That's a huge credit to the DIY community's engineering chops. IMO the trick is to find a compression driver that's as smooth as possible to minimize the manipulations required. I don't suppose there's a 1" exit JBL ring radiator with Voishvillo's phase plug? Tymphany and SB Acoustics have gotten into the compression driver market. Maybe they have a more "hifi" sensibility of prioritizing smoother (never going to get smooth from a compression driver on a horn) response over performance venue filling SPL?

Ring radiator compression drivers are not necessarily superior to a traditional dome shaped diaphragm. They feature less surface area and have problems with distortion at their lower bandwidth limit, have lower mass and lesser low end extension. What Erin's test (thank you!) showed most prominently is that a large 2-way needs a sophisticated correction network. The equalization showed what can be achieved. The large SEOS-15 waveguide is a competent design that can be corrected in many ways because pattern and directiviy seem to be stable and correlated both on- and off-axis, albeit a bit large. A more expansive passive network or an active version help more than spending money on a boutique compression driver.
 

Ericglo

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2020
Messages
452
Likes
323
Monoprice HTP-1.

IMO the SEOS horn design really shines in the normalized polars. That's a huge credit to the DIY community's engineering chops. IMO the trick is to find a compression driver that's as smooth as possible to minimize the manipulations required. I don't suppose there's a 1" exit JBL ring radiator with Voishvillo's phase plug? Tymphany and SB Acoustics have gotten into the compression driver market. Maybe they have a more "hifi" sensibility of prioritizing smoother (never going to get smooth from a compression driver on a horn) response over performance venue filling SPL?

https://www.madisoundspeakerstore.c...audience-bianco-44cd-pk-compression-driver-1/

This SB looks like it might work.
 

hex168

Senior Member
Joined
May 29, 2020
Messages
399
Likes
341
Thanks, that would do it. Not sure about the value proposition of a $4000 processor and a compete set of separate amps to enable anechoic correction of a $300 speaker. I guess you could go Denon X3700H and use all the pre-outs to a miniDSP 10x10 HD for about half the price.
Wouldn't any Denon with Audyssey XT32 do this with the app? No miniDSP or separate amps needed?
 

beaRA

Active Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2021
Messages
223
Likes
315
Wouldn't any Denon with Audyssey XT32 do this with the app? No miniDSP or separate amps needed?
Does the MultEQ Editor app give you access to Manual PEQ? Without that, you can't do a correction based on these anechoic results.
 
Top Bottom