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Buckeye NC252MP Stereo Amplifier Review

Rate this amplifier:

  • 1. Poor (headless panther)

    Votes: 11 3.7%
  • 2. Not terrible (postman panther)

    Votes: 22 7.5%
  • 3. Fine (happy panther)

    Votes: 174 59.0%
  • 4. Great (golfing panther)

    Votes: 88 29.8%

  • Total voters
    295

mskis

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Wanted to add my subjective thoughts to this. I am the very happy new owner of this amp. Real world performance is excellent. It drives my Kef R7 to extraordinarily loud levels with no audible distortion. Buckeye also offers features (auto sense!) that other companies costing quite a bit more fail to include. Id highly recommend based on my short trial period!
 

AudioKC

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Wanted to add my subjective thoughts to this. I am the very happy new owner of this amp. Real world performance is excellent. It drives my Kef R7 to extraordinarily loud levels with no audible distortion. Buckeye also offers features (auto sense!) that other companies costing quite a bit more fail to include. Id highly recommend based on my short trial period!

Great!

I'm driving a KEF R11 from it (Dirac Live Bass Control, with active crossover). Love it, can go up to 95-100db at my listening position!

I got the version with a trigger (no auto sensing) but Topping DM-7 has a trigger line and it works perfectly well.
 

formdissolve

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I live in a small space and can't play loud, so I'd probably max out around 25-30 watts, with usual listening around 10-15. If I'm reading this chart correctly, I'd be around peak distortion in the 15kHz and above range while at about 30 watts?

1715107406173.png
 

David_M

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Not really, but there is hardly any music information at 15 KHz or above. A typical spectrum for a high-resolution recording displays a declining slope from the midrange on up. By 15KHz, the levels are -60dB or lower (referenced to the midrange), so the power of the 15KHz harmonic is 30W / 1,000,000 = 30 uW or lower! Now, that is almost humanly impossible to hear, let alone 10-15uW when listening at 10 - 15W levels. Now, that 10uW - 30uW signal has distortion peaks -70dB lower, making that spec ridiculous to even concerned about.
 

formdissolve

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Not really, but there is hardly any music information at 15 KHz or above. A typical spectrum for a high-resolution recording displays a declining slope from the midrange on up. By 15KHz, the levels are -60dB or lower (referenced to the midrange), so the power of the 15KHz harmonic is 30W / 1,000,000 = 30 uW or lower! Now, that is almost humanly impossible to hear, let alone 10-15uW when listening at 10 - 15W levels. Now, that 10uW - 30uW signal has distortion peaks -70dB lower, making that spec ridiculous to even concerned about.
Thanks for the explanation! I can barely hear above 17kHz anyways, but wanted to make sure I wasn't hearing distortion in the upper midrange either. That said, I'm sure my speakers have higher distortion than anything this amp has anyways.
 

peng

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Thanks for the explanation! I can barely hear above 17kHz anyways, but wanted to make sure I wasn't hearing distortion in the upper midrange either. That said, I'm sure my speakers have higher distortion than anything this amp has anyways.
You are super safe. To hear the harmonics distortions of 15 kHz, you have to be able to hear 30 kHz. That's for harmonic distortions, the lowest one is the 2nd harmonics, hence 30 kHz.
 

Sokel

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Not really, but there is hardly any music information at 15 KHz or above. A typical spectrum for a high-resolution recording displays a declining slope from the midrange on up. By 15KHz, the levels are -60dB or lower (referenced to the midrange),
More like -30db (or less,depending the song,format and music genre ),but yes,still a lot lower (but not as vast as -60db compared to mid,that's silence) :

Chart 352.8kHz, 256k fft, In L  Out L+R.png

(that's hi-res I had in hand from another thread just before)
 

AudioKC

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I live in a small space and can't play loud, so I'd probably max out around 25-30 watts, with usual listening around 10-15. If I'm reading this chart correctly, I'd be around peak distortion in the 15kHz and above range while at about 30 watts?

View attachment 368266

Check the multitone at 5 watts, it’s below audible range of distortion. This THD graph above takes into account high frequency distortion that you are not going to hear (see at the top graph, 45khz bandwidth).
In other words it’s not what you will hear.
 

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David_M

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More like -30db (or less,depending the song,format and music genre ),but yes,still a lot lower (but not as vast as -60db compared to mid,that's silence) :

View attachment 368277

(that's hi-res I had in hand from another thread just before)
That's true for a hi-rez recording with gentle sloping filters as you've shown, but at 44.1kHZ CD sampling rates, the filters are much steeper/aggressive, causing a much steeper drop from mid-reference of 50 to 60dB to meet the requirements of the 44.1k sampling filter (-96dB from reference at 22.01kHz).
 

Sokel

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That's true for a hi-rez recording with gentle sloping filters as you've shown, but at 44.1kHZ CD sampling rates, the filters are much steeper/aggressive, causing a much steeper drop from mid-reference of 50 to 60dB to meet the requirements of the 44.1k sampling filter (-96dB from reference at 22.01kHz).
Agreed in general.
But there are strange stuff around (16/44.1Khz) :

Chart 44.1kHz, 256k fft, In L  Out L+R.png

(Pan Sonic -Connections and there's more like it in that strange album)

Is considered a torture test,try them sensibly!
 

antcollinet

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That's true for a hi-rez recording with gentle sloping filters as you've shown, but at 44.1kHZ CD sampling rates, the filters are much steeper/aggressive, causing a much steeper drop from mid-reference of 50 to 60dB to meet the requirements of the 44.1k sampling filter (-96dB from reference at 22.01kHz).
That doesn't seem to match what we see with typical default filter characteristis in DACs measured here. EG, this one from the most recent DAC review. Essentially zero attenuation up to 20Khz (Unless I am misunderstanding what you are saying)

Topping D50 III Balanced Stereo DAC PEQ Frequency Response Measurements.png
 

Sokel

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That doesn't seem to match what we see with typical default filter characteristis in DACs measured here. EG, this one from the most recent DAC review. Essentially zero attenuation up to 20Khz (Unless I am misunderstanding what you are saying)

View attachment 368338
I think he's talking about the music spectrum,not the DACs.
 

antcollinet

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I think he's talking about the music spectrum,not the DACs.
But was talking about aggressive filters at 16/44.1 - I am obviously (still) failing to understand. Or was he talking about ADC filters?

In which case are studios filtering significantly below 20KHz?

*Confused*
 

Sokel

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Not really, but there is hardly any music information at 15 KHz or above. A typical spectrum for a high-resolution recording displays a declining slope from the midrange on up. By 15KHz, the levels are -60dB or lower (referenced to the midrange), so the power of the 15KHz harmonic is 30W / 1,000,000 = 30 uW or lower! Now, that is almost humanly impossible to hear, let alone 10-15uW when listening at 10 - 15W levels. Now, that 10uW - 30uW signal has distortion peaks -70dB lower, making that spec ridiculous to even concerned about.
But was talking about aggressive filters at 16/44.1 - I am obviously (still) failing to understand. Or was he talking about ADC filters?

In which case are studios filtering significantly below 20KHz?

*Confused*
This is the point I replied and I guessed it was about recordings.
So...

Edit:Yep,you're right about the point that the DAC will also filter,missed that.Nope.
 
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