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What is your favorite house curve

legopart

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This one anywhere on the scale.
krispy, and life sound.
compare to it, flat headphones lifeless sounding
HD16.png
 
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KozmoNaut

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Since I use an AVR with standard Audyssey MultEQ, I can't edit the target curve directly. The standard reference curve Audyssey uses has a slight downward slope, as is pretty standard.

Running the calibration several times to test various subwoofer settings, my Monitor Audio Bronze 2s only require ± 1-2dB EQ in a few bands to match the curve.

Putting it to "flat" instead, the high end is boosted ~5dB, so I guess it's a relatively mild slope.

Works out pretty well for a living room. Main listening position sounds great, and the rest of the room has very even sound throughout.
 
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Ron Texas

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After trying several of these curves I can report with certainty is they sound very different. The Toole & Olive Curve has noticeably more bass (to me) than the B&K curve. Flat to 1,000 with 6 db down @ 20khz sounded way to forward in the midrange, to me. For your own listening the right curve is the one you like best. Speaker manufacturers have other things to worry about.
 

JoachimStrobel

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I've been using Dirac via a MiniDSP DDRC-22D for years. Here's my actual measurement followed by my preferred default curve correction:
... looks good. Did you measure and optimize left and right jointly or seperatly? My guess is jointly and I wonder if you would gain some harmonizing by doing it seperatly. I know that the general advice is, to do corrections jointly.
 
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Yes I did them jointly. I did try doing the channels separately some time back on the original Dirac version without noticing any difference but I haven't tried it on Dirac 2.0.
 

Dimifoot

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LRC.jpg

Surr.jpg


My bed 7 channels (can't measure Atmos), preferred-eq curve
 

Dimifoot

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And an averaged 3-seat (Front-back-center each seat) 9 positions LRC measurement (1/3 smoothing)
aver.jpg
 
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Do you know what your on-axis direct curve looks like after correction?
No I don't but it's something that would be interesting, I only have a 10-15 degree toe in on the LP measurements above. I might crank up REW when I get back from golf later today.
 

Thomas_A

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No I don't but it's something that would be interesting, I only have a 10-15 degree toe in on the LP measurements above. I might crank up REW when I get back from golf later today.
You can just measure at 1 meter and gate the response to below 5 ms to get an approximate direct curve > 1 kHz. I am asking due to the rather large dip 2-4 kHz in the room response - you may after correction get a peak around 2-4 kHz in the direct curve.
 
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You can just measure at 1 meter and gate the response to below 5 ms to get an approximate direct curve > 1 kHz. I am asking due to the rather large dip 2-4 kHz in the room response - you may after correction get a peak around 2-4 kHz in the direct curve.
You mean the notorious BBC dip......yep they are B&W speakers :facepalm:
 

Thomas_A

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You mean the notorious BBC dip......yep they are B&W speakers :facepalm:
Ok, understood. Dips in this region may be had for different reasons. BBC had their model for compensation for large hall diffuse sounds. I also have a slight dip but for other reasons, the comb filtering effect of stereo system errors.
 
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Ok, understood. Dips in this region may be had for different reasons. BBC had their model for compensation for large hall diffuse sounds. I also have a slight dip but for other reasons, the comb filtering effect of stereo system errors.
Yes now that I understand what you were looking at I can confirm that the dip is there whether the speakers are on axis or off, I think I might have seen maybe a 1dB difference with aggressive toe-in in the past. I've had the speakers for 6 or 7 years and I've come to dislike the dip, if it wasn't for the DRC I would have changed speakers by now.
 

Thomas_A

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Yes now that I understand what you were looking at I can confirm that the dip is there whether the speakers are on axis or off, I think I might have seen maybe a 1dB difference with aggressive toe-in in the past. I've had the speakers for 6 or 7 years and I've come to dislike the dip, if it wasn't for the DRC I would have changed speakers by now.
For unknown reasons quite many later models of the B/W speakers have odd fr response curves (not like the Matrix series 2 that were excellent etc). My question was not really response whether they were toed in or not, but rather what your on-axis response is when speakers are placed at your optimal position from the front wall, i.e. a using a gated measurement (excluding floor/roof/wall bounce). But perhaps that is what your mean, and not the "non-gated" whole-room measurement?
 

Juhazi

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For the last five years something like this (measured at and near spot, L/R speaker separately. 4-way active diy speakers with minidsp 4x10HD. More tilting of highs sounds dull to me. If I eq the bass hump, sound gets too thin!
ainogneo83 koti wavelet.jpg
ainogneo83 conf3 room spot vari 500ms 112.jpg
 

ernestcarl

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I've experimented some more with different curves in my MLP -- to me this preference does change slightly depending on the particular speaker, treble quality, bass extension and quality, xo points, and usual listening volume... For example with the KH120 I can have the treble on neutral (or even be boosted) and be fine, but the LSR305, shelving of the treble is an absolute must. This is the latest "curve(s)" that I am liking for both music and movies nearfield over the desk:

1574203824523.jpeg


Currently, at my higher crossover point config setting of 120Hz, I changed my (base) Reference Volume to 100%. Meaning, the loudness DSP comes into effect automatically when volume is set lower than 100%. Originally, when I had my xo at 80Hz, I preferred to have this around 70%.

My normal listening volume is still at 70% or ~74dB (see cursor at the red line).

Right now, I am listening to Muse's "Hysteria" on Spotify at full volume -> routed to JRiver's WDM driver and playing at 15% volume. At this very low listening volume, the music still sounds extremely balanced from bass to treble. :D

I can still hear music at 10% volume, too, but it's so low that you can't really appreciate it even with the aid of DSP. If you want to tone down the effects of the loudness DSP, just lower your Reference Volume to maybe 70% or 60% etc. -- or even turn it off with a click of a button. I have not explored other software e.g. Foobar2000, but they may have a dynamic loudness DSP (plugin?) too...
 

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