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Response curves and why your doing it wrong.

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Shadrach

Shadrach

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Feb 24, 2019
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I'm the opposite. When I was younger I was really into bass, the more the better. These days I really appreciate a more analytical type sound. Which is kinda odd seeing how as I'm getting older I'm losing the higher frequencies. Which kind of reminds me of a thought I had a while back, like at what frequency does a loss beyond that really degrade the sound to the level of non enjoyment.
Unfortunately the analogy of a womens body shape and prefered sound curves seems to have gone down like a lead balloon. My bad.:D
Like many here in the later years of life, my hearing isn't what it used to be. Not only have I lost high frequency hearing, each ear has suffered in a non symetrical manner; too many hours spent testing avionic kit I would guess.
Most here on ASR could probably do with a hearing test; not just a frequency loss test but a proper audiogram test which I get for life thanks to my early years in the avionics industry. Perhaps we would get fewer posts reliant on subjective impressions if some knew just how bad their hearing is.
I started off attempting to equalize to the Harman preference curve. From headphones to speakers not once did I find any of the curve options pleasing and eventually I adjusted mostly below the transition frequency to my taste. All the equalizations I made that I liked were bass heavy.
 

Ze Frog

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Unfortunately the analogy of a womens body shape and prefered sound curves seems to have gone down like a lead balloon. My bad.:D
Like many here in the later years of life, my hearing isn't what it used to be. Not only have I lost high frequency hearing, each ear has suffered in a non symetrical manner; too many hours spent testing avionic kit I would guess.
Most here on ASR could probably do with a hearing test; not just a frequency loss test but a proper audiogram test which I get for life thanks to my early years in the avionics industry. Perhaps we would get fewer posts reliant on subjective impressions if some knew just how bad their hearing is.
I started off attempting to equalize to the Harman preference curve. From headphones to speakers not once did I find any of the curve options pleasing and eventually I adjusted mostly below the transition frequency to my taste. All the equalizations I made that I liked were bass heavy.
Yeah, there's definitely something in the hearing side that is often overlooked as you point out. I'm not sure of mine, haven't had a test since primary school days where they would play certain tones and see if you could hear them, and since just the relative same. A more complex test would surely be interesting.

People should definitely not be afraid to use EQ for sure though. I aim for flat, but that's largely because then if I want to EQ I will have a more defined way of knowing exactly what I'm changing and how much. I think a lot of people look at places like ASR and assume it's all about absolutely having a rigid flat line and don't dare alter it. For me the measurements and a flat starting point is more easy to EQ to where I want it, no massive dips to fill leading to voids in the sound.
 
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