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Buchardt Anniversary 10 Measurements and Review

Theriverlethe

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What obsession? The Apple Homepod is the only small speaker I can think of trying to fare without a sub. I don't know if the Buchardt is small anyway at 16 liters external.
Have you never heard of anyone having restrictions in space or aesthetics, or just preferring minimalism?
The Apple HomePod is pretty impressive for what it is. I couldn’t find a niche for it except as an alarm clock.

By “small” I meant bookshelves as opposed to towers. I’m sorry but minimalism simply doesn’t work for sub-bass dispersion unless you have a very small room or a single near field listening position.
 
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I really don’t understand the obsession with low frequency extension in small speakers. I’m a big fan of two-ways with multiple subwoofers, but the two-ways need to be built for dynamic headroom, not unused low end.
It's the major limiting factor for output. These Purifi woofers are especially good at low distortion and bass extension.

Also it's seriously trivial to put in a crossover to roll off the bass. It's current tuning is fine and is not something that can't be easily worked around if the low end extension design is a problem.
 

Theriverlethe

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It's the major limiting factor for output. These Purifi woofers are especially good at low distortion and bass extension.

Also it's seriously trivial to put in a crossover to roll off the bass. It's current tuning is fine and is not something that can't be easily worked around if the low end extension design is a problem.
They’re exceptional but still 6.5” woofers. Good luck getting reference level at 30 to 40Hz.
 
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They’re exceptional but still 6.5” woofers. Good luck getting reference level at 30 to 40Hz.
Of course not. How about a much more common scenario?

Exactly how many bookshelf speakers do you see that don't suffer massively in harmonic distortion in multitone as it plays below 200hz, or even 100hz? It's not many. So the better we can play with low distortion down to a crossover of between 60 and 80 hz, I consider that a big win for a bookshelf.

I say 60 because even at 80 hz crossovers I often hear male vocals coming from the subwoofer, particularly if the crossover slope is shallow. 60hz has an advantage. Half the time I don't see bookshelf speaker is getting below 100 hertz without ramping up distortion rapidly. It's not a trivial problem.

Then there's a use case. It's not like bookshelves are meant to be put in a giant room or a floor stander would be the better option. So going for extension in a bookshelf makes sense especially if the volume isn't going to be " referce level " . A competent bookshelf similar to this would be good for that middle ground where the room is just a little small to have speaker as furniture but a little too big than say a medium sized office.

So yes shooting for low end reproduction in a bookshelf speaker is a great thing to do. Tuning it as they have plays to its strengths. It's trivial to cross over that speaker via a receiver or something else if it's that much of a problem.
 

jaakkopetteri

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I’m sorry but minimalism simply doesn’t work for sub-bass dispersion unless you have a very small room or a single near field listening position.
I don't really see your point. Those two options are already a huge market, mostly left untouched
They’re exceptional but still 6.5” woofers. Good luck getting reference level at 30 to 40Hz.
Not nearly everyone needs reference level output
 

Theriverlethe

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Of course not. How about a much more common scenario?

Exactly how many bookshelf speakers do you see that don't suffer massively in harmonic distortion in multitone as it plays below 200hz, or even 100hz? It's not many. So the better we can play with low distortion down to a crossover of between 60 and 80 hz, I consider that a big win for a bookshelf.

I say 60 because even at 80 hz crossovers I often hear male vocals coming from the subwoofer, particularly if the crossover slope is shallow. 60hz has an advantage. Half the time I don't see bookshelf speaker is getting below 100 hertz without ramping up distortion rapidly. It's not a trivial problem.

Then there's a use case. It's not like bookshelves are meant to be put in a giant room or a floor stander would be the better option. So going for extension in a bookshelf makes sense especially if the volume isn't going to be " referce level " . A competent bookshelf similar to this would be good for that middle ground where the room is just a little small to have speaker as furniture but a little too big than say a medium sized office.

So yes shooting for low end reproduction in a bookshelf speaker is a great thing to do. Tuning it as they have plays to its strengths. It's trivial to cross over that speaker via a receiver or something else if it's that much of a problem.
If you hear male vocals coming from a subwoofer at 80Hz, it's likely a poor subwoofer integration. We're talking about 14' wavelengths. I suppose the subwoofer could have an in-room resonance somewhere north of 120Hz if the crossover slope is too shallow and the resonance hasn't been cut with EQ or acoustic treatment. What does the in-room response look like? I have a cheap soundbar/woofer unit in a bedroom that's likely crossed over above 150Hz and I can't localize male voices from the tiny "subwoofer" at all.
 

Theriverlethe

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I don't really see your point. Those two options are already a huge market, mostly left untouched

Not nearly everyone needs reference level output
That’s a fair point about the untouched market segment. I personally wouldn’t spend over $4,000 without the expectation of reference level capability in a ~12x20 room. It looks like the original review neglected to mention tunable low-frequency slopes, so maybe it is capable in this regard.
 
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If you hear male vocals coming from a subwoofer at 80Hz, it's likely a poor subwoofer integration. We're talking about 14' wavelengths. I suppose the subwoofer could have an in-room resonance somewhere north of 120Hz if the crossover slope is too shallow and the resonance hasn't been cut with EQ or acoustic treatment. What does the in-room response look like? I have a cheap soundbar/woofer unit in a bedroom that's likely crossed over above 150Hz and I can't localize male voices from the tiny "subwoofer" at all.

Maybe. But also maybe not. If the slope is 2nd order, at 80hz, the output is only down 5db at 100hz and 10db at 160hz on a Bessel. So, the slope for sure is the culprit. I think Denon uses a 2nd order slop on it's receivers, so that's easily it. Moved to 60hz, we're 8db down at 100hz and 15db at 160hz. That's enough to make the sub less noticeable with male vocals in my room.

Also, sometimes, the slope matters with phase matching / integration to the mains. Sometimes a steeper slope helps, sometimes, for coverage, less so. So it just depends.
 

Theriverlethe

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I
Maybe. But also maybe not. If the slope is 2nd order, at 80hz, the output is only down 5db at 100hz and 10db at 160hz on a Bessel. So, the slope for sure is the culprit. I think Denon uses a 2nd order slop on it's receivers, so that's easily it. Moved to 60hz, we're 8db down at 100hz and 15db at 160hz. That's enough to make the sub less noticeable with male vocals in my room.

Also, sometimes, the slope matters with phase matching / integration to the mains. Sometimes a steeper slope helps, sometimes, for coverage, less so. So it just depends.
If it works, it works. I’d question whether Denon’s implementation counts as intrinsically broken. I’ve taken to just turning up the delays until I get a smooth integration because YPAO invariably screws it up.
 
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GPx86

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I've been wanting to try some powered speakers for surround channels on my Monoprice HTP-1. These seem like a really great option. There is a scenario where I might use these in a home office for 2 channel sometime in the future, so I am trying to extract value with that proposition as well. Is there any reason why it would not be a good idea to run a cable straight off my pre-pro and have these work surround channel duty?
 
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