• WANTED: Happy members who like to discuss audio and other topics related to our interest. Desire to learn and share knowledge of science required as is 20 years of participation in forums (not all true). Come here to have fun, be ready to be teased and not take online life too seriously. We now measure and review equipment for free! Click here for details.

Osborn loudspeakers

Joined
Oct 6, 2020
Messages
28
Likes
20
#1

Beave

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2020
Messages
374
Likes
657
#2
Their website says they partially pre-break-in the crossover components for you. It's nice that they leave some of the joys of break-in to the customer.
 

dfuller

Addicted to Fun and Learning
Joined
Apr 26, 2020
Messages
970
Likes
1,162
#3
I see some oddities in that design. Lots of space between the tweeter and midrange... like way more than I'd want to see for something even approaching decent vertical dispersion.

Also...the lead lined cabinets? I just - why?
 

Blumlein 88

Major Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Feb 23, 2016
Messages
11,664
Likes
17,263
#4
I see some oddities in that design. Lots of space between the tweeter and midrange... like way more than I'd want to see for something even approaching decent vertical dispersion.

Also...the lead lined cabinets? I just - why?
Felt/lead lined. To dampen vibration of the cabinet is the why.
 

Beave

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2020
Messages
374
Likes
657
#5
Looks like a 7" mid, crossed to the tweeter at 3.5kHz, according to the specs of the Epitome towers.

Wouldn't that likely mean a significant directivity error at crossover? That's a large mid AND a high crossover point.
 

dfuller

Addicted to Fun and Learning
Joined
Apr 26, 2020
Messages
970
Likes
1,162
#7

Beave

Senior Member
Joined
May 10, 2020
Messages
374
Likes
657
#8
Are they using SEAS drivers?
The woofers look like Seas Excel paper cones with Nextel coating. The tweeters look like Seas Excel models.

But the midranges appear to be Scanspeak Illuminator woofers.
 

ctrl

Addicted to Fun and Learning
Joined
Jan 24, 2020
Messages
810
Likes
2,592
Location
.de, DE, DEU
#9
The drivers are, as has already been said, of very good quality.

The high frame around the drivers (for speaker coverage) will cause interference along with the tweeter.

The Scan Speak 180mm midrange driver shows only minor break up resonances, but they are present and show delayed decay, which could be a (minor) problem at a crossover frequency of 3.3/3.5kHz @12dB/Oct.

Due to the width of the loudspeaker cabinet, a slight widening of the radiation should show up between 1.5-2kHz - related to a flat on-axis frequency response. However (because of the rather wide cabinet), it should show an even, broad radiation (related to a -6dB limit) up to 2 kHz.

The directivity and sound power (and thus also PIR) could be very special, since the radiation of the 180mm midrange clearly beams at a frequency of 3.5kHz and the tweeter radiates very broadly at this frequency. The effect should be somewhat mitigated by the flat second-order filter - if the specification refer to the acoustic order of the filter and not the electrical.

This can sound quite pleasant, but you should make sure in any case in a listening session that you like this sound.


Why! Why! :facepalm:
Each crossover weighs about 5 kg. each and is hard wired with specially selected ultra wide bandwidth, high speed data transfer cable.
Source: Website
 

Frank Dernie

Major Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Mar 24, 2016
Messages
5,469
Likes
12,215
Location
Oxfordshire
#10
Also...the lead lined cabinets? I just - why?
A lead lining is one of the most effective ways of blocking sound transmission, so preventing it getting through the cabinet walls.
I did experiment with a wall treatment containing a lead sheet in my DIY cabinets about 45 years ago. The treatment had a damping layer, to damp the walls, then a lead layer to block transmission then an "absorbing" layer to reduce inner reflections. What they called "absorbing" was anti-reflection though it "absorbed" nowt.
Mass to block transmission has been a known, standard, taught in college technique for at least 50 years.
I was sure my speakers sounded better with it, of course :)
 

dfuller

Addicted to Fun and Learning
Joined
Apr 26, 2020
Messages
970
Likes
1,162
#12
A lead lining is one of the most effective ways of blocking sound transmission, so preventing it getting through the cabinet walls.
I did experiment with a wall treatment containing a lead sheet in my DIY cabinets about 45 years ago. The treatment had a damping layer, to damp the walls, then a lead layer to block transmission then an "absorbing" layer to reduce inner reflections. What they called "absorbing" was anti-reflection though it "absorbed" nowt.
Mass to block transmission has been a known, standard, taught in college technique for at least 50 years.
I was sure my speakers sounded better with it, of course :)
Okay, second time, I'm aware of that, but my point is that it's entirely unnecessary to go that extreme.
 

Frank Dernie

Major Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Mar 24, 2016
Messages
5,469
Likes
12,215
Location
Oxfordshire
#13
Okay, second time, I'm aware of that, but my point is that it's entirely unnecessary to go that extreme.
You may well be right but that doesn't stop those who believe these things are important making concrete, composite and other complex cabinets which probably cost a lot more than a lead lining.
There are loads of them.
 
Joined
May 13, 2021
Messages
71
Likes
96
#14
A lead lining is one of the most effective ways of blocking sound transmission, so preventing it getting through the cabinet walls.
I did experiment with a wall treatment containing a lead sheet in my DIY cabinets about 45 years ago. The treatment had a damping layer, to damp the walls, then a lead layer to block transmission then an "absorbing" layer to reduce inner reflections. What they called "absorbing" was anti-reflection though it "absorbed" nowt.
Mass to block transmission has been a known, standard, taught in college technique for at least 50 years.
I was sure my speakers sounded better with it, of course :)
Asbestos has some very nice properties, but there are some real down sides, like cancer. By now we now that lead is also very hazardous (long term leakage, improper disposal, etc) and I'm flabbergasted that anyone would use lead lining in a speaker today!
 

Blumlein 88

Major Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Feb 23, 2016
Messages
11,664
Likes
17,263
#15
Okay, second time, I'm aware of that, but my point is that it's entirely unnecessary to go that extreme.
I'm not so sure you are correct. One can evaluate a cabinet with and without the lining in testing. Whatever the influence of the cabinet vibration on sound, lead will reduce it. Is it a cost effective reasonable solution versus other approaches? I'm not in a position to say, but using such damping material isn't total audio woo like so many things.
 
Top Bottom