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Meyer Sound Amie Monitor Review

Rate this speaker:

  • 1. Poor (headless panther)

    Votes: 8 2.9%
  • 2. Not terrible (postman panther)

    Votes: 37 13.6%
  • 3. Fine (happy panther)

    Votes: 165 60.7%
  • 4. Great (golfing panther)

    Votes: 62 22.8%

  • Total voters
    272

amirm

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This is a review, listening test and detailed measurements of the Meyer Sound Amie Studio (active) monitor speaker. It is on kind loan from a member and costs US $4,080 each (sold in pairs?).
Meyer Sound Amie Studio Active Monitor Speaker Review.jpg

The deep, horn like waveguide sets the speaker apart from its competitors. The large throat of the port and larger than normal enclosure (relative to its woofer) imparts similar feeling. Speaker is not that heavy despite having a large heatsink on the back:
Meyer Sound Amie Studio Active Monitor Speaker back panel Review.jpg

As you see, or rather don't, there is only a balanced input and speakon type connector for power. There are no controls for gain, bass, treble, etc. I am fine and actually happy with the latter two but did wish to have a gain setting. Driving the speaker at 0 dbu on the first test, I nearly jumped out of my chair in how loud the speaker played!

Speaker is designed and built in Berkeley California. In other words, some of the highest labor costs possible.

Speaker was measured using Klippel Near-field Scanner. I could not find anything in the manual regarding acoustic reference so went for the tweeter. Measurement temperature was 67 degrees F.

Meyer Sound Amie Speaker Measurement
As usual, we start with our suite of anechoic frequency response measurements:
Meyer Sound Amie Studio Active Monitor Speaker frequency response anechoic measurement.png

At macro level, response is flat and extends quite deep (F10 of 43 Hz). Focusing in, there are a lot of minor disturbances which we will diagnose shortly. The other big thing that stands out is the sudden drop in high frequency response as soon as the tweeter takes over around 1100 Hz. Company documentation states this is intention as to avoid console bounce and such.

Near-field response quickly shows that the front port is letting loose resonances that mix with on-axis response:
Meyer Sound Amie Studio Active Monitor near-field Speaker frequency response anechoic measurem...png


The woofer also has a couple of bumps but it has very controlled behavior above its pass band with resonances at very low levels.

The narrow tweeter response naturally impacts our early window reflections (assuming far field listening):
Meyer Sound Amie Studio Active Monitor Speaker frequency response anechoic early window measur...png


We see that all responses other than on-axis (represented as "Front Wall") are attenuated which is what they aimed. Once blended with on-axis response, the step is not as pronounced but is still there:
Meyer Sound Amie Studio Active Monitor Speaker frequency response predicted in-room measurement.png


Again, this is for far field listening. Impact for near/mid-field listening would be less.

We already know the story on directivity but let's dig into directly:
Meyer Sound Amie Studio Active Monitor Speaker horizontal beamwidth measurement.png

Meyer Sound Amie Studio Active Monitor Speaker horizontal directivity measurement.png


Vertical directivity is specially tight:
Meyer Sound Amie Studio Active Monitor Speaker vertical directivity measurement.png


Distortion is impressively low for such a small speaker:
Meyer Sound Amie Studio Active Monitor Speaker relative THD Distortion measurement.png


Meyer Sound Amie Studio Active Monitor Speaker THD Distortion measurement.png


While I didn't capture it, even at 103 dBSPL, the sweep sounded very clean with no sign of strain or distortion.

EDIT: I ran step sweeps from 96 dBSPL to 101 dB to see how far it can go:

Meyer Sound Amie Studio Active Monitor Speaker  Power Limiting measurement.png

As I have indicated, speaker starts to limit bass response around 97 dBSPL at 1 meter. What is strange is that it limits a specific frequency range. Response below 100 Hz is fine as is 500 Hz.

Waterfall graph is ruthless in the way it shows the port/woofer resonances:
Meyer Sound Amie Studio Active Monitor Speaker csd waterfall measurement.png


Step function shows some kind of optimization in timing of the woofer and tweeter:
Meyer Sound Amie Studio Active Monitor Speaker step response measurement.png


Meyer Sound Amie Listening Tests
Up to this point my impression was that "this is a good speaker but not great." That changed in an instant when I started to listen to it. That impressive and clean bass with practically unlimited dynamic response (in near-field listening) plastered a big smile on my face that remains up to this point! Sitting on axis, tonality is excellent as helped with bass response. Track after track not only sounded right, it also sounded beautiful.

On tracks with deep sub-bass, speaker simply didn't play that region making me thing there is a high-pass filter in there. This was the only miss.

Really, the sound was as perfect as I would wish it.

Note however that this is all with direct, on-axis response. Move to the left or right a few inches and highs drop right off. This also means that there are no spatial effects. With my eyes closed, the sound would come very focused form the speaker itself. Of course this is in mono. In stereo you would get a center image but I expect overall effect to be a smaller, more focused soundstage.

EDIT: I listened for noise. There is hiss from tweeter but it is somewhat "warm" in flavor and dies out at about 1 foot.

Conclusions
Active monitors have such a great advantage over passive speakers in the way they can be so optimized. Alas, many short change you when it comes to power, dynamics or deep bass. This is especially true in smaller monitors. I can fix frequency response errors in EQ but can't do anything about lack of power or too much distortion. It is clear that Meyer Sound put dynamics and clean power front and center. It gives up a small amount of precision but gives you all you want in dynamics which fits my priorities just fine. That said, I wish they would do a revision and put the port in the back.

I am going to put the Meyer Sound Amie monitor on my recommended list. It will be a model I will remember together with a small handful of other top performing studio monitors.

-----------
As always, questions, comments, recommendations, etc. are welcome.

Any donations are much appreciated using: https://www.audiosciencereview.com/forum/index.php?threads/how-to-support-audio-science-review.8150/
 

Attachments

  • Meyer Sound Amie Frequency Response.zip
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Theodore8

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What a find! Had never heard of this brand. Thank you @amirm
 

tmtomh

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Always great to see another nicely designed active monitor measured and reviewed - thanks @amirm , and thanks @GXAlan !

I don't want to contribute to the ASR-member habit of dinging equipment based on use-case instead of performance, so I took off no points in my evaluation for the very limited connectivity options and lack of DSP - although it does seem a waste not to have a digital input on an $8k/pair active monitor.

I voted Fine instead of Great, though, because of that super-narrow treble directivity, poor waterfall, and pretty extreme roll-off below 50Hz. I understand the bass roll-off and treble shelf are by design, but I don't think one has to have those drawbacks in order to get studio monitors with excellent near field response and imaging, certainly not at that price point.
 
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AnalogSteph

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Looks like a pretty good match with previous measurements:
 
OP
amirm

amirm

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Not competitive with the Genelec/Neumann level at all.
Keep in mind that this is a small and light speaker yet plays as if it is much larger.
 

nagster

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amirm, GXAlan
I am always grateful for your help.
I've always had a pretty good chance of liking the sound of meyer sounds. Even recently. I wanted to know the secret.
 

ROOSKIE

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Speaker is not that heavy despite having a large heatsink on the back:
You must be getting fit from all the class A lifting, or getting ripped at the gym.
Specs say 25lbs per speaker which is on the beefier side for a 6.5" based unit.

Cool speaker.
 

Sokel

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In room response of the speaker is my absolute favorite,that along with low distortion down low and enough power to deliver makes it a rare breed.
I'll eat my hat if someone has complained about fatigue (with the proper source).
Amir's listening impressions doubles for that,price is reasonable for what it offers,what else to ask for it's intended use?

Thanks Amir!
 

G|force

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Thank you Amir! There's something special about a california based audio company founded by hippies that have procured enough land to ensure a steady supply of consistent wood pulp to produce CONES
20201124_182320.jpeg
 
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bobster

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Founded by hippies, but they're a well-established name in pro audio - concert venues, touring acts, broadcast, recording and mastering engineers, etc. They've been at their Berkeley location a long time, since before real estate prices got quite so insane. I've heard their speakers at KPFA radio in Berkeley, Yoshi's jazz club (both as an audience member and on stage as a performer), and in the studio of a prominent local mastering engineer.

in a world where KH150s and 8341Bs exists, I don't see the reason of chosing this one over the competition.

I agree.
 

tmtomh

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In room response of the speaker is my absolute favorite,that along with low distortion down low and enough power to deliver makes it a rare breed.
I'll eat my hat if someone has complained about fatigue (with the proper source).
Amir's listening impressions doubles for that,price is reasonable for what it offers,what else to ask for it's intended use?

Thanks Amir!

I've never heard them and have no problem believing they sound excellent. And given that treble shelf, I can see that "fatiguing" is the last thing they'd be.
 

Rja4000

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Thanks
Very interesting!

my impression was that "this is a good speaker but not great." That changed in an instant when I started to listen to it. That impressive and clean bass with practically unlimited dynamic response
One could probably have deducted that from various measurements, especially distortion.

For me, and I'm sure for quite a few people, this capacity to play seemingly effortlessly at real life level is a key quality of a good loudspeaker (you have "loud" in the name to begin with, don't you ? And real instruments ARE loud.)

But appart from the distortion, which you don't systematically (never ?) publish above 96dB, what measurement could highlight and immediately prove the dynamic capability of a speaker ?
Just asking.
 
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Ilkless

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THD is below 1% down to 50hz at 86dB free field. That's insane for a 6.5" class active speaker.

KH150 hits 1% only at 40Hz at 86dB. Without having to deal with all the little jaggy resonances this Meyer has.

index.php


Plus, waveguide engineering has proceeded way past the 10kHz DI bump this has. Seems like these guys haven't gotten the memo and are coasting off blind worship of their cottage industry designs like ATC.
 

pierre

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Score is 5.1 and would be 7.3 with a perfect subwoofer (which is likely the case with the Amie sub).

The speaker is very well optimised and I would not use an EQ with it.

With eq, it looks better on the on-axis and listening window but I am not convince by the change in the PIR and you can see the negative effect in the histogram. I would need to listen to it to see if that makes a positive and audible difference.
With EQ, score would increase marginally up to 5.6 (resp. 7.8 with sub).

filters_eq.png


Code:
EQ for Meyer Sound Amie computed from ASR data
Preference Score 5.15 with EQ 5.61
Generated from http://github.com/pierreaubert/spinorama/generate_peqs.py v0.25
Dated: 2023-10-01-14:55:41

Preamp: -2.7 dB

Filter  1: ON PK Fc    58 Hz Gain -1.52 dB Q 2.99
Filter  2: ON PK Fc    95 Hz Gain +0.99 dB Q 1.87
Filter  3: ON PK Fc   260 Hz Gain +1.80 dB Q 2.99
Filter  4: ON PK Fc   560 Hz Gain +1.23 dB Q 2.98
Filter  5: ON PK Fc  1429 Hz Gain +1.20 dB Q 2.95
Filter  6: ON PK Fc  4051 Hz Gain +1.01 dB Q 2.94
Filter  7: ON PK Fc 10341 Hz Gain +2.65 dB Q 0.53
 
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