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Truthear x Crinacle Zero:RED IEM Review

Rate this IEM:

  • 1. Poor (headless panther)

    Votes: 8 2.0%
  • 2. Not terrible (postman panther)

    Votes: 13 3.2%
  • 3. Fine (happy panther)

    Votes: 43 10.7%
  • 4. Great (golfing panther)

    Votes: 338 84.1%

  • Total voters
    402
Thanks to both of you.

I have learnt a little more about how to play with EQs then @phoenixdogfan. being a logaritmic scale, I wasn't sure with the Q adjustments it'd just work changing the sign!

@markanini, indeed this enhances the steps quiet a bit. Definitely going to use it.
 
Very late to the party with these, and wired IEMs in general... the last pair I had were some Shure SE215 about ten years ago, which I loved, but left on a plane and never got around to replacing!

These Reds are impressive I have to say. I find the impedance adapter gives me the low end that I'm looking for - which may be related to how they fit in my ears. They "stick out" a little - though it's not uncomfortable. I'm using the Foobar2000 iOS app to play FLACs from my file server - and this doesn't seem to have a parametric EQ. But a small "air" lift around 10k and above on the graphic EQ works nicely for me. I don't see the need to touch the upper mids particularly - which makes me think I probably wouldn't enjoy the blue version as much.

It's great that decent sounding stuff is so affordable now.
 
I'm a year late but never mind. I already owned the original Truthear Zero and finally got around to buying the Red version reviewed here. I've had them for a few days and have put a lot of hours on them. They are a little different to the original. There are two quite noticeable differences: the bass is presented differently. It is a little less powerful and at its lowest is a little less deep. The other obvious difference is that this new version is more sensitive and noticeably louder on low power devices such as a smartphone. I'm not sure I think one version is better than the other but if you mostly listen with a smartphone then the newer version makes more sense. At home, with a headphone amp, I think I prefer the original Truthear for its overall sound and because its lower sensitivity works better with proper amplification and allows more fine grained volume control.
 
the original Truthear for its overall sound and because its lower sensitivity
The other obvious difference is that this new version is more sensitive and noticeably louder
The "original" sensitivity is 74 and the Red is 66, (mv required for 94 dBSPL) so yes, the red is more sensitive than the blue, but, they both work fine with a Iphone or apple dongle, that is, if your are not already deaf or working on becoming deaf soon.
 
The "original" sensitivity is 74 and the Red is 66, (mv required for 94 dBSPL) so yes, the red is more sensitive than the blue, but, they both work fine with a Iphone or apple dongle, that is, if your are not already deaf or working on becoming deaf soon.
No need for snarky comments about deafness. A more sensitive IEM is better with less powerful portable devices but sometimes less satisfactory with headphone amplifiers and similar, that's all. And this may be a surprise but there is far more to portable and home audio than an iPhone and an Apple dongle.
 
No need for snarky comments about deafness.
Did not mean to be snarky, was not implying you were deaf, just mentioning that if someone is not careful, both IEM can easily cause damage even driven by a IPhone.
A more sensitive IEM is better with less powerful portable devices
Yes, agree, more sensitive is better, but in this case, they are both plenty sensitive to be played by a portable device and I would add, both can be enjoyed without EQ, making them both the perfect companion to portable device.
 
I found that the less sensitive version is not always adequately sensitive with older recordings. We have really got used to *very* loud production but millions of old albums, classical and jazz especially, were produced at quite low levels but with great dynamic range. At home this doesn't matter but on a smartphone it can. The same with portable DAB radio receivers. Smartphones tend to be volume limited, especially in the EU due to legislation designed to prevent hearing damage. Portable DAB receivers tend to be volume limited because they intrinsically have appalling battery life and limiting voltage is the easiest way for the manufacturers to try to disguise or manage this. Replay Gain in album mode can help but support for this is limited outside of rather niche apps.
 
Rtings made a video review:
I've started to look at IEMs because my M&D MW08s are starting to fail. Or rather the bluetooth loses connection as I'm out walking down the street. So rather than spend
$$$ on a bluetooth IEM that will only last a couple of years... I'm thinking of going old school. Also I tend to prefer the foam tips over silicon. Have to say these seem to be a good choice along w the Apple USB dongle. I'm considering the RED or the DITA Audio Project M or the Moon Drop Dusk.

Obviously a big price jump between the Red and the other two.
 
I'm considering the RED or the DITA Audio Project M or the Moon Drop Dusk.

Obviously a big price jump between the Red and the other two.
Also a big jump in refinement from the Dita to the other two.

The treble response on the Dita is a disaster:
graph (5)~2.png
 
Hmmm.
It seemed to get good reviews... such a bump seems to be intentional?
It may well be intentional, or just incompetence.

What matters is that this kind of response is definitely not accurate, by any decently objective measure.

It's an extreme treble boost, baked into the earphone.

Edit:
Here's the response on the new B&K5128, compared to a well tuned set:
graph (48).png
Link: https://crinacle.com/graphs/iems/gr...USK_DSP_Default_S1&bass=8&tilt=-0.8&tool=4620

Bass and midrange look nice, but that treble response is seriously chewed up with a particularly nasty peak at 12kHz
 
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That treble looks funny. Anyway Red and Dusk are both good allrounders. Some IEMs are excell at something specific and do worse with other things. Litte point in getting an IEM like that unless you want up make it into a hobby of collecting IEMs and convene with other nerds about it. Bottom line either either Red or Dusk will be good choices that cover a lot of ground.
 
It may well be intentional, or just incompetence.

What matters is that this kind of response is definitely not accurate, by any decently objective measure.

It's an extreme treble boost, baked into the earphone.

Edit:
Here's the response on the new B&K5128, compared to a well tuned set:
View attachment 376067
Link: https://crinacle.com/graphs/iems/gr...USK_DSP_Default_S1&bass=8&tilt=-0.8&tool=4620

Bass and midrange look nice, but that treble response is seriously chewed up with a particularly nasty peak at 12kHz
OK,

So I'm new to wired IEMs.

I think the issue is that you're going by the Harma curve as the target that all IEMs should have.
And that's ok... I think the Reds supposedly do a good job of that and for the price, a really great value.

@markanini ,
I suspect I will end up with a couple of IEMs...
Not so much to talk w other 'nerds' about it. ( I can already do that w work stuff ;-) )
But more that I'm the type to buy and keep, which is why I spend more time researching my purchases.

My max price point is $400.00 which opens the door to a lot of options. (Too many)
Just need foam tips.
 
OK,

So I'm new to wired IEMs.

I think the issue is that you're going by the Harma curve as the target that all IEMs should have.
And that's ok... I think the Reds supposedly do a good job of that and for the price, a really great value.

@markanini ,
I suspect I will end up with a couple of IEMs...
Not so much to talk w other 'nerds' about it. ( I can already do that w work stuff ;-) )
But more that I'm the type to buy and keep, which is why I spend more time researching my purchases.

My max price point is $400.00 which opens the door to a lot of options. (Too many)
Just need foam tips.
Nothing wrong with trying a few IEMs to get a feel for what you like. Harman or not IEMs that are popular tend to follow a similar curve. At the same focusing on tiny deviations on a graph is less useful than some people think. If you want to some more IEMs suggestions I hear good things about Aful Performer 5 and especially Truthear Hexa has unmatched staying power. Foam tips can be brought from any of the Chinese Hifi retailers like Shenzenaudio, Linsoul and Hifigo, or find their listnings on Amazon.
 
I think the issue is that you're going by the Harma curve as the target that all IEMs should have.
But I'm not.

I don't particularly like Harman IE, and have not shown it in any graph.

Peaky and uneven treble is bad, no matter the target response. It's the opposite of high-fidelity (signal in=signal out).

That's what I'm criticizing. Not the lack of target adherence.
 
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I have been listening to both the Blue and Red editions for the past six months. My preference is Blue for Classical and Red for everything else.
 
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