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Dynaudio Emit M10 Review (bookshelf speaker)

dfuller

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Indeed, and they moved that xover point pretty darned high in the latest offerings.

I had the Emit 10s, and they definitely shoot for that "presence" and "air".

That said, talk to me about those Footprints! I've been considering the 02's for some time now, and was hoping they'd get measured here and unseat my 8030's.
I mean, they go low and get loud as nuts and sound good doing so. Quite wide and even dispersion.
 

mjvbl

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There's really no such thing as a first order electrical crossover; in theory a single cap or coil will give you a first order electrical crossover, but the variable impedance of the drivers in question will not result in a first order acoustic response. Outside of esoteric trash you're not going to see that approach.

If you want a first order acoustic response, which is a pretty outdated idea frankly, you actually need very special drivers and a fairly complex crossover, since you need to shape the response over many octaves instead of like one and a half. Dynaudio makes very damped woofers and robust tweeters, which helps a lot, but you sacrifice a few things.

Applying a 1st order electrical filter to a driver can give you all sorts of various acoustic roll-offs. There is no reason to expect a 2nd order roll. With excellent design and drivers often a 1st order will give acoustic rolls of 2nd and 3rth order (even 4th). You can also get no roll off at all in case of a hypothetical driver with a severe break-up & or severe rising response.

My best guess would have been that Dynaudio makes their drivers for their "1st order crossover topology" (their words) so that they have very gentle roll-offs beyond the target XO frequency so that after adding a cap / coil the final result is 2nd order acoustic.

Step response would show that. But right, from what I recall seeing about their Heritage Special (again "1st order crossover topology") for the step response there I think that actually looked like a step response that would be produced by a 4th order crossover. (Which I think is a good thing.)

By eyeballing the bump in the DI for this model, it's like 2kHz wide, don't know if that could provide some clues about steepness of the XO slopes.

In their LYD models they use pretty high crossover points, e.g. 5.2kHz in the LYD5 according to the specs, and it appears to be around 4kHz in the review here and the bump in the DI is narrower.
 
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akarma

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No sense to talk about electrical order. Acoustic order is more informative
 
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Glasvegas

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After all these technical discussions, I’m still trying to understand why Amir found these speakers bright, yet everyone on this thread who has owned or listened to them has the opposite opinion.

Is it simply a case of different ears?
 
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Steve Dallas

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After all these technical discussions, I’m still trying to understand why Amir found these speakers bright, yet everyone on this thread who has owned or listened to them has the opposite opinion.

Is it simply a case of different ears?

Different ways of describing what we hear, which is why subjective opinions are nearly always questionable.

1. They sound like there was is broad hole in mids
2. They have exaggerated upper bass and treble

1 and 2 can mean the same thing. I would have written 1, but Amir chose to write something like 2.

Both of us can be correct in the subjective realm.
 

Glasvegas

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Different ways of describing what we hear, which is why subjective opinions are nearly always questionable.

1. They sound like there was is broad hole in mids
2. They have exaggerated upper bass and treble

1 and 2 can mean the same thing. I would have written 1, but Amir chose to write something like 2.

Both of us can be correct in the subjective realm.

I think he used that phrase to describe the measurements. In his subjective listening tests he just said they were bright. Maybe he was expecting them to sound bright based on the measurements.
 

Steve Dallas

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I think he used that phrase to describe the measurements. In his subjective listening tests he just said they were bright. Maybe he was expecting them to sound bright based on the measurements.

I will not presume to speak for Amir, but if you read enough of his subjective comments, you learn he values deep bass, even frequency response, and wide, even directivity. Being that the Emits have limited low bass extension and recessed mids, his brightness comment makes perfect sense in context.
 
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amirm

amirm

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After all these technical discussions, I’m still trying to understand why Amir found these speakers bright, yet everyone on this thread who has owned or listened to them has the opposite opinion.

Is it simply a case of different ears?
While I usually try to defend my subjective testing :), this is not one of those occasions. I tried to note that in the review that I was stomped by my subjective testing of this speaker when it didn't respond to equalization the way I expected. I remember as I was messing with the EQ that there were a bunch of other bookshelf speakers at lower cost that were easy to EQ and produced excellent sound and gave up at that point.

So please don't put too much emphasis on my subjective results in this review.
 

testp

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yeah, i like dynaudio and those tweeters and with low distort, but what is wrong with some tweeter protection..? i can't tell how many times i've seen mine looking like sandwich after kids visiting, i guess they have their own opinion how soft-'bowl'-dome tweeters should look, how knows.. maybe they sound even better then.
 

RobS

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Dynaudio has always struck me as an engineering brand that unnecessarily ties one hand behind itself (eg. the slavish obsession with first-order slopes

Their new TOTL Confidence models are 2nd/3rd order and Evokes are 2nd order. So they ain't so dogmatic anymore, but I think there are good reasons why 1st order is preferable to all other crossover topologies.
 

ace_xp2

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...I know that Audioholics measured the Denon AVR crossover to be 12dB/oct on the speakers and 20dB/oct on the sub:
image

Just read the article, even they think it's odd that it's 20/12 and not 24/12. Also, as they mentioned this seemingly odd crossover (24/12) is the thx spec holdover, which was built when active crossovers were seemingly quite expensive. The intent was that you'd use sealed speakers whose boxes were built such that they'd have a 12db rolloff @80hz on the low end. Thus you'd get 24/24 and nice summation.

It's funny that this is still around, given the number of people adding all variety of speakers in a haphazard fashion (ported?80/100/120hz rolloff? oh well, send it!) and that offering options in crossovers is afaik not a serious added expense now.
 

Glasvegas

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yeah, i like dynaudio and those tweeters and with low distort, but what is wrong with some tweeter protection..? i can't tell how many times i've seen mine looking like sandwich after kids visiting, i guess they have their own opinion how soft-'bowl'-dome tweeters should look, how knows.. maybe they sound even better then.

Just think of it as a form of EQ. Did it affect the brightness?
 

celroid

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I wonder if there's any noticeable difference with their brothers the Emit M20s. I considered buying them in the past, but after the reviews of amir got the DBR-62. Hope I chose well.
 

Steve Dallas

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I wonder if there's any noticeable difference with their brothers the Emit M20s. I considered buying them in the past, but after the reviews of amir got the DBR-62. Hope I chose well.

The larger ones are most likely very similar. Expect deeper bass extension / amplitude and increased directivity errors thanks to the larger woofer.

I don't have Emit data, but I do have Excite data (not level matched):

Dynaudio X14 vs X18 Stereo MMM.png
 
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SMc

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I wonder if there's any noticeable difference with their brothers the Emit M20s. I considered buying them in the past, but after the reviews of amir got the DBR-62. Hope I chose well.
I chose the DM 2/7 over the M10 equivalent DM 2/6. Yes, noticeably different!

I’m sure your ELACs are fine.
 

Xyrium

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I wonder if there's any noticeable difference with their brothers the Emit M20s. I considered buying them in the past, but after the reviews of amir got the DBR-62. Hope I chose well.
They're tough to beat in that price range, enjoy!
 
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