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what are your industrial design favorites?

Sal1950

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As far as I know: available only through: Smokey Mountain Harley Davidson.
They're custom builds. The ones in the photos are combinations of older and newer Sportster parts.
Pretty cool stuff for the dirt.
Back at our dealership we built a Sportster ice racer along similar crazy thoughts.
Not competitive in anything, a real handful to ride, but it sure drew a lot of attention. LOL
 

Doodski

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As far as I know: available only through: Smokey Mountain Harley Davidson.
Check out their Scrambler ride video (Produced by Hot Bikes).
I found this video. A couple of riders in that video are very fast for a Harley weight ride.
Also found this one with a header that makes some pretty nice noise. A harsh wipe out in this one too.
This one has some nice enduro style riding on big Harleys.
50 Years of Wins | Harley-Davidson 750, flat track racing. I consider flat track racing to be one heck'uva scary ride and takes guts and skill.
 

Sal1950

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50 Years of Wins | Harley-Davidson 750, flat track racing. I consider flat track racing to be one heck'uva scary ride and takes guts and skill.
100 mph, in the dirt, with no brakes allowed. o_O
 

Doodski

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100 mph, in the dirt, with no brakes allowed. o_O
I tried it on a 2 stroke dirt bike on a old racing flat track at about 50-65 mph and it was one heck'uva ride. There where many rocks on the track because it had not been maintained for decades but I gave it a go anyway. I have a lot of respect for flat track racers.
 

EJ3

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They're custom builds. The ones in the photos are combinations of older and newer Sportster parts.
Pretty cool stuff for the dirt.
Back at our dealership we built a Sportster ice racer along similar crazy thoughts.
Not competitive in anything, a real handful to ride, but it sure drew a lot of attention. LOL
You are correct, Sal1950.
But, back in the day, you could order stuff from the car dealership that would come with you new car & you could have them put it on or you could put it on. That is about the same way this works. You can order your Scrambler from them, specked as you want it, or you can get the parts through them & do it yourself. Naturally, you can find your own sources for the parts you want, also.
But that particular Harley Davidson dealer caters to the Scrambler style of Harley Davidson's and has a higher percentage of people that are actually out, using the parts & other gear.
A testing system of sort of what is good, great & not so much. Based on their experience with that particular style (& the hard use that it goes through), I think that dealing with them is the way to go, should I actually pull the trigger on that style of bike (which, at some point in the future, is likely for me to do).
But right now I am renovating a house so that my wife & I have a place to live. Prior to getting married, having a house to live in wasn't such a priority (actually not a priority at all). A garage with a toilet & water hose was fine. Hot water was a +.
In regards to custom built Harley's, I have rarely met a Harley that wasn't custom in some way, shape or form.
 

IPunchCholla

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I've had a pure class A amp before rated to max 75w@8R with linear output to 2 ohms and it was hot but I live in a cool place most days of the year and it just adds to the heat already being used in the household. But this is like you say a monster amp and may be like just like a resistive heating element in use.
It’s been 100/38 here the last couple of weeks. I had a 8 watt class A on for an hour biasing it at ten at night. It noticeably warmed the room.
 

Doodski

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It’s been 100/38 here the last couple of weeks. I had a 8 watt class A on for an hour biasing it at ten at night. It noticeably warmed the room.
Wowzer. That kind of temperature where I live would set records. We have not seen over ~23C so far this year and at night it goes down to ~11-12C. I like it this way. Not into roasting myself under the sun...lol :D
 

EJ3

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They're custom builds. The ones in the photos are combinations of older and newer Sportster parts.
Pretty cool stuff for the dirt.
Back at our dealership we built a Sportster ice racer along similar crazy thoughts.
Not competitive in anything, a real handful to ride, but it sure drew a lot of attention. LOL
This is among the best, if not the best dual purpose Harley Davidson builds I've seen:
 

Sal1950

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This is among the best, if not the best dual purpose Harley Davidson builds I've seen:
They're not terribly different from the Sportsters Evil Knievel used to build for jumping.
He'd have been thrilled to have that amount of suspension travel. :)
 

fløyen

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What also doesn't appeal is the sharp edge on the web between the crank arm and the chainring spider, which is a stress riser that will eventually root a crack and start a fatigue failure process. That was a true design flaw in the Campy cranks. I have them on the bike I rode in college, but I don't put big miles on them and I keep an eye out for that spot.

Later designs that incorporate one of the spider arms into the crank and provide a nice radius on those edges are far stronger and more durable without any additional weight.

And the Campy-style headset bearings are, like all headset bearings that use balls, subject to fore-and-aft vibrations that pump out the lubricant and then dig holes in the races. Stronglight's Delta was the true solution--tapered roller bearings.

But there's just nothing that captures the lust factor of a high-end groupset from back when we were poor college students.

IMG_6643-dsqz.JPG


IMG_6653-dsqz.JPG


Rick "Campy NR side-pull brakes are the most beautiful ever" Denney
Here's my college bike. Cougar frame from Terry Dolan, the famous Liverpool plumber and groupset bought bit by bit as a student, put together by Dauphine Sport on Boxhill. I ride a more modern Raleigh or Reid machine these days, shimano-equipped with carbon seat stays and forks. It rides pretty much the same when your my age. The roads in NZ are perhaps quieter in the countryside, but I still have the odd close call.
 

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Count Arthur

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Here's my college bike. Cougar frame from Terry Dolan, the famous Liverpool plumber and groupset bought bit by bit as a student, put together by Dauphine Sport on Boxhill. I ride a more modern Raleigh or Reid machine these days, shimano-equipped with carbon seat stays and forks. It rides pretty much the same when your my age. The roads in NZ are perhaps quieter in the countryside, but I still have the odd close call.
Very nice.

It's nice to see that steel frames have made a bit of a come back in recent years and there are lots of modern options available, but they are nearly all tig welded. What you don't see so much of is the classic lugged construction of the older frames.

Some of them were quite fancy. :)

1655457956336.png


And much as I like the look of the classic 80s groupsets, the modern stuff is better, it's so much quicker and easier to set up and maintain, and works really well. I have a Shimano 105 2x11 speed, disc groupset on one of my bikes, and the shifting and braking performance is in a different league to the old un-indexed downtube shifters, and sidepull brakes.
 

EJ3

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They're not terribly different from the Sportsters Evil Knievel used to build for jumping.
He'd have been thrilled to have that amount of suspension travel. :)
Yes, he would have.
From the Smithsonian:
Knievel rode this motorcycle during some of his most spectacular jumps. By carefully coordinating his angle, thrust, and speed, which reached 90 to 100 miles per hour at takeoff, he remained in the air for as far as 165 feet. He chose (and customized) this motorcycle, a 1972 Harley-Davidson XR-750, because it was a light, dependable racing machine. Made of steel, aluminum, and fiberglass, it weighs approximately 300 pounds.
deliveryService
 

Sokel

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5014_bayercello.jpg



Not exactly favorite but interesting...

cello 2.0.PNG
 

EJ3

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They're not terribly different from the Sportsters Evil Knievel used to build for jumping.
He'd have been thrilled to have that amount of suspension travel. :)
Carducci Dual Sport (SC3 Gera Baja, a variation of the Ghost Town Bike [SC3 Adventure] being produced now through
© 2022 Carducci Dual Sport LLC):
 

RayDunzl

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Well, other similar events might have a little more backyard "industrial design" examples...

wiseco+hillclimb.jpg



But this video is particularly entertaining, nonetheless


" As usual, officially no one made it to the top of the hill but we saw a Suzuki rider managed to pass the finish line with his front wheel."


Winter Sports version:

 
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rdenney

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Here's my college bike. Cougar frame from Terry Dolan, the famous Liverpool plumber and groupset bought bit by bit as a student, put together by Dauphine Sport on Boxhill. I ride a more modern Raleigh or Reid machine these days, shimano-equipped with carbon seat stays and forks. It rides pretty much the same when your my age. The roads in NZ are perhaps quieter in the countryside, but I still have the odd close call.
Those hubs look like Campy Gran Sport high-flange hubs. The frame is classic British Simplified with what look like Prugnat SL lugs, while the one shown by Count Arthur has the classic British Baroque Nervex lugs. Mine is more like yours--simplified to the point of being minimalist by 70's standards, but still elegant and beautiful. I particularly like the way Bill attached the seat stays to the ears on the seatpost clamp:

IMG_6649-dsqz.JPG


Rick "rides on dedicated paths and back roads these days" Denney
 

Sal1950

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Yes, he would have.
From the Smithsonian:
Knievel rode this motorcycle during some of his most spectacular jumps. By carefully coordinating his angle, thrust, and speed, which reached 90 to 100 miles per hour at takeoff, he remained in the air for as far as 165 feet. He chose (and customized) this motorcycle, a 1972 Harley-Davidson XR-750, because it was a light, dependable racing machine. Made of steel, aluminum, and fiberglass, it weighs approximately 300 pounds.
deliveryService
My 1977 H-D XLCR with my 2 nephews Kyle and Ryan.
I used to take them one at a time and sit them on the tank in front of me and we would ride everywhere.
They probably had over 1,000 miles each on them before they 10 yo.
They're now mid 30s and of course ride H-D, it's in their blood. ;)
Kyle-Ryan-XLCR.jpg
 

fløyen

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Those hubs look like Campy Gran Sport high-flange hubs. The frame is classic British Simplified with what look like Prugnat SL lugs, while the one shown by Count Arthur has the classic British Baroque Nervex lugs. Mine is more like yours--simplified to the point of being minimalist by 70's standards, but still elegant and beautiful. I particularly like the way Bill attached the seat stays to the ears on the seatpost clamp:

IMG_6649-dsqz.JPG


Rick "rides on dedicated paths and back roads these days" Denney
In the picture there's a mix of nuovo record large flange (with newer MA2 rim) on the back and classic record hub GP4 rim on the front. I was in England for just a few days and dug the machine out of the attic. When a friend came over to go for a ride I discovered the rear wheel didn't have any glue on the tub, so went for safety first. This rear wheel had been built 25+years ago, including tyre, but this was its first ride. Even my mate was astonished. The bottom bracket on this bike was very narrow and quite flexible compared with modern machines. I come from the Lake District, but even there a 42x19 bottom gear was considered adequate. I think it was a 21 tooth "granny gear" on this wheel. I've heard them called hero gears by youngsters, but that's, of course, what everyone rode back then.
 

Doodski

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My 1977 H-D XLCR with my 2 nephews Kyle and Ryan.
I used to take them one at a time and sit them on the tank in front of me and we would ride everywhere.
They probably had over 1,000 miles each on them before they 10 yo.
They're now mid 30s and of course ride H-D, it's in their blood. ;)
View attachment 213399
Nice pic and those exhaust pipes look like they have been pretty hot. :D
 

EJ3

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My 1977 H-D XLCR with my 2 nephews Kyle and Ryan.
I used to take them one at a time and sit them on the tank in front of me and we would ride everywhere.
They probably had over 1,000 miles each on them before they 10 yo.
They're now mid 30s and of course ride H-D, it's in their blood. ;)
View attachment 213399
I like the X style exhaust crossover. In theory it adds torque while not hurting horsepower. That has also been my experience with X-Pipe exhaust crossover's on everything with even amounts of cylinder banks 2 cyl. to V-8's (haven't played with V10's & more, so don't know). This type of crossover also changes the engine tone (personally, I like the sound).
 
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