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Can you really hear the sound details over 20kHz?

sam

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#1
I have been listening to music really really long time and I think I can notice the difference between crappy mp3 and good lossless source. But I can never say that the ultrasonic frequencies affects my listening.
There's whole lot of expensive high tech stuff that can extend the frequencies past 20kHz, whether it's a speaker or a DAC/AMP. But personally, I don't think it will affect my listening and it would have less impact as I age more.

I'm not saying "because I can't hear it, it's useless" But I'm just wondering if there's anyone in need for frequencies over 20kHz.
I tested my hearing few month ago and I can't hear anything above 16kHz, so this sad truth tells me extremely high frequencies can't bother me at all.
 

Blumlein 88

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#2
Don't see anything to disagree with in your post.

Just for reference, there are something like 1.5 to 2 % of young adults that can perceive tones above 20 khz. The threshold is very high at more than 100 db and I think there isn't anyone who could do better than 23 khz. Considering how rarely any high levels occur near 20 khz with music it isn't much to worry about.
 

Wes

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#3
Your hearing test was almost surely sine waves in isolation.

The fly in the ointment is that music consists of complex waveforms. We don't know for sure if the first test always generalizes to music.

We do know that mp3 is fine for most people on most music, using whatever systems they used when doing the R&D on it.
 

sergeauckland

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#5
Try switch on-off test with 20kHz wave. You might hear/feel the "on" transient and then increased pressure in your ear. (I am 65 :D)
This may also be because the source of 20kHz, however low distortion, may also have an amount of low level broadband noise, and it's the noise that one senses.

S.
 

pma

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#7
This may also be because the source of 20kHz, however low distortion, may also have an amount of low level broadband noise, and it's the noise that one senses.

S.
Maybe yes, maybe no, maybe a speculation, as noise floor level remains measurably the same and electronics and speaker remains on all the time.
 

Matias

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#9

andreasmaaan

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#11
The fly in the ointment is that music consists of complex waveforms. We don't know for sure if the first test always generalizes to music
Do we have any evidence, or a suggested mechanism by which, it doesn't?
 

Beershaun

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#13
I am inferring that you are equating file sample rate with hearing frequency range. If thats the case, Sample rate is not related to hearing frequency range. It is the number of samples per second used to encode the analog music signal. Whether that signal is 20hz or 20khz. Please ignore if my assumption is incorrect.
 

Geert

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#14
From "Behavioral Hearing Thresholds Between 0.125 and 20 kHz Using Depth-Compensated Ear Simulator Calibration - Jungmee Lee, Ph.D., Sumitrajit Dhar, Ph.D., [...], and Jonathan Siegel, Ph.D. (2012)". (Other studies came to the same conclusion).
nihms445330f2 (1).jpg
The conclusion is that in practice we are deaf above 20kHz (an lower if you're a bit older). (Or you should amplify high frequencies until they smoke your tweeters).
 

solderdude

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#17
How hard can it be to filter a 24/96 or 24/192 recording to 20kHz and AB that against the original ?
Better make sure the transducer has no problems with >20kHz material.
 

muslhead

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#18
anyone know the world population distribution of being able to hear above 20kz?
I struggle with 12k and even at that level, there is nothing of interest or adds to music i listen to and from what i can tell i am missing very little in the context of content.
 
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