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Can anyone explain the vinyl renaissance?

Mikig

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I can see what you mean there, and why the look of a real book would be strange and have some demerit points relative to what you’ve gotten used to.

For me, images on digital screens, have a sort of unsubstantial ephemeral quality.

It’s a sort of (but not exactly) the medium is the message thing for me. Digital images come to me in a medium that I associate with quick gratification, where the amount of information and pictures seems unlimited, and in which I bounce around, taking in titbits of images and information in a sort of restless fashion. And I find it just influences my experience of whatever is presented to me on that platform - on computer screens of one sort of another.


That even happens with images I really love. My friend is a painter, incredibly talented at capturing the nuances of delicate light. I can view his paintings on his website on my computer screen (which is a nice large 5K computer screen), but it’s nothing like being in the gallery and observing the paintings in person. I’m much more absorbed and take more time drinking in the nuances in that condition than I am when it’s just another one of countless possible images on my computer screen.

Likewise, I have a large book of drawings and sketches by the film animator Ray Harryhausen. I can see some of those images online, But it’s just not the same as the tangibility of holding a reproduction of the art in my hands, and being able to examine it.

A lot of this, of course, comes down to one’s relationship to digital life and screens. Some people, certainly more young people, seem pretty comfortable with staring at the screens much of the time. Where are some of us find it salubrious to take breaks from screens and interact with the tangible world.

Too each his/her own of course.
it's OT, but I share a concern of mine: I realize more and more that what I read from a screen or see on a screen, I tend to forget more easily. I don't know why but when I read on a tablet, computer, phone I have a lower capacity to memorize.
 

Jaxjax

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WTF is a kindle..? :cool:
I still read books & even magazines. I do however read more online. I'm 50/50 digital-vinyl & tell the wife to never ever get rid of our cd collection & vinyl for sure not..If for any reason of when SHTF I can go full on prepper mode & do it while listening to some good music..
 

Count Arthur

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WTF is a kindle..? :cool:
I still read books & even magazines. I do however read more online. I'm 50/50 digital-vinyl & tell the wife to never ever get rid of our cd collection & vinyl for sure not..If for any reason of when SHTF I can go full on prepper mode & do it while listening to some good music..
 

mhardy6647

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And what lame, self-deceiving hipster excuse are you going to give for actually owning and enjoying books when the anti-analogue book forces come to re-educate you?
I've read Fahrenheit 451 -- unfortunately. ;)

It's a great book, and I like Truffaut's (1966) movie version.
The "big screen television" still gives me pause.
5zYqucF-3hMXUY6CR-y8GBRUzBNmg5GuCuO2XqhZrZY.jpg


Little did they know -- or did they?
:eek:


EDIT:

Fahrenheit 451...
Kindle...


_3504309.jpg


Oh.
My.
G*d.

;)
 

pderousse

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it's OT, but I share a concern of mine: I realize more and more that what I read from a screen or see on a screen, I tend to forget more easily. I don't know why but when I read on a tablet, computer, phone I have a lower capacity to memorize.
Me too and I see it in my students. Take a look at Miriam Wolf, Proust and the Squid - a fun book. It is an adequately studied phenomenon. Her research leads to the conclusion that as a species we evolved from storing memories on physical media. Seeing them reminds us of their content, which impresses on the memory; but, she also argues that our eyes and brain do different things with screens than they do with paper.
 

Axo1989

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Miriam Wolf can explain the paper renaissance: Readers retain and process at a deeper level print that appears on paper over print on screens. The results of many exhaustive studies can be found in Proust and the Squid and Reader come Home, whicih appear in codex form. Those conclusions are analogous to what vinyl lovers are saying.
it's OT, but I share a concern of mine: I realize more and more that what I read from a screen or see on a screen, I tend to forget more easily. I don't know why but when I read on a tablet, computer, phone I have a lower capacity to memorize.
Me too and I see it in my students. Take a look at Miriam Wolf, Proust and the Squid - a fun book. It is an adequately studied phenomenon. Her research leads to the conclusion that as a species we evolved from storing memories on physical media. Seeing them reminds us of their content, which impresses on the memory; but, she also argues that our eyes and brain do different things with screens than they do with paper.

Maryanne Wolf? Looks interesting. Squid was written in 2008 so almost exactly pre-dates the iPhone.

While I like to see things to remember them rather than just hear them, some of that is about being able to locate and review, and for me that's hopeless with physical media and less hopeless with electronic. It wouldn't surprise me either if people's brains respond to their formative and learning experiences: growing up with paper vs screens and so on. In any case the arguments and data presented at that time would need an update. Maybe Reader being 10 years later does that?

Anyway as I mentioned I barely read hard copy, but have an apparently good memory for things seen and read, so all is not lost.
 

Galliardist

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Me too and I see it in my students. Take a look at Miriam Wolf, Proust and the Squid - a fun book. It is an adequately studied phenomenon. Her research leads to the conclusion that as a species we evolved from storing memories on physical media. Seeing them reminds us of their content, which impresses on the memory; but, she also argues that our eyes and brain do different things with screens than they do with paper.
Interesting, but how true? Most people would only have had physical media for more than pictures of things for a few hundred years. Society can evolve in one sense of the word over that time, but humans? Most human learning over millennia will have been either through demonstration, or oral/maybe by gesture.
 

pderousse

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Interesting, but how true? Most people would only have had physical media for more than pictures of things for a few hundred years. Society can evolve in one sense of the word over that time, but humans? Most human learning over millennia will have been either through demonstration, or oral/maybe by gesture.
Sorry, I can’t brook all of these premises (pictograms date to at least c. 2800 BC, tokens a few centuries earlier, cave prints c. 30k BC, cutting-tool funerary epitaphs, etc. to at least 100k BC) or be the spokesperson for an entire field of linguistics (AXO), let alone a scholarly witness of reading neuroscience at the moment when developed countries started to turn from the codex, c. 2008. One either reads a book, or does not read a book. Have we drifted from the analogy?

Can we can get to 347 ?
 

Axo1989

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Sorry, I can’t brook all of these premises (pictograms date to at least c. 2800 BC, tokens a few centuries earlier, cave prints c. 30k BC, cutting-tool funerary epitaphs, etc. to at least 100k BC) or be the spokesperson for an entire field of linguistics (AXO), let alone a scholarly witness of reading neuroscience at the moment when developed countries started to turn from the codex, c. 2008. One either reads a book, or does not read a book. Have we drifted from the analogy?

Since the codex format replaced the scroll, and is in turn replaced by the scrolling screen, we are enjoying a kind of methodological palindrome.

But if you are going to throw a book at a thread, then circumscribe further discussion of your ideas/conclusions drawn from it or with anyone responding to same, that's not much better than a post-and-run.
 
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Axo1989

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I've read Fahrenheit 451 -- unfortunately. ;)

It's a great book, and I like Truffaut's (1966) movie version.
The "big screen television" still gives me pause.
5zYqucF-3hMXUY6CR-y8GBRUzBNmg5GuCuO2XqhZrZY.jpg


Little did they know -- or did they?

Can't believe I haven't watched that yet. You've definitely kindled my desire to do so ...
 

DanielT

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The vintage "warm" sound that many people think you get from vinly, plus from vintage stuff in general has branched out:

 

mhardy6647

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Can't believe I haven't watched that yet. You've definitely kindled my desire to do so ...
Well played, sir. Well played. :)

I haven't seen it for a long time myself. I remember it as a very good movie; very atmospheric.
I got the urge to see it again myself when I went looking for stills from the movie.

The vintage "warm" sound that many people think you get from vinly, plus from vintage stuff in general has branched out:


Dude.
Head bump algorithms*.
The mind boggles.
1708685618882.gif

Studer Studer A80 Mk II 2-inch 24-track (!) frequency response at 15 ips and 30 ips.
Source: https://www.endino.com/graphs/

:cool:

________________
* That's the problem with the modern world. I thought this would be a joke of sorts.

giphy (5).gif


 
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Newman

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Can't believe I haven't watched that yet. You've definitely kindled my desire to do so ...
Excellent double-punnery, both with and without the capital ‘k’.
 

Galliardist

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Sorry, I can’t brook all of these premises (pictograms date to at least c. 2800 BC, tokens a few centuries earlier, cave prints c. 30k BC, cutting-tool funerary epitaphs, etc. to at least 100k BC) or be the spokesperson for an entire field of linguistics (AXO), let alone a scholarly witness of reading neuroscience at the moment when developed countries started to turn from the codex, c. 2008. One either reads a book, or does not read a book. Have we drifted from the analogy?

Can we can get to 347 ?
And what percentage of the world’s populatio could read, write, have access to media to the learn practical activities, over the timescal required to “evolve”? It’s just not the case. Only a privileged or selected member minority had access to such things, and they had to be invented and developed first.

For society yes, they are important and they were more prevalent in urban society and later democratised to a greater or lesser extent.

As for analogies, where we often learn most is in how they break, or so I find.
 

pderousse

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And what percentage of the world’s populatio could read, write, have access to media to the learn practical activities, over the timescal required to “evolve”? It’s just not the case. Only a privileged or selected member minority had access to such things, and they had to be invented and developed first.

For society yes, they are important and they were more prevalent in urban society and later democratised to a greater or lesser extent.

As for analogies, where we often learn most is in how they break, or so I find.
Well, that’s all in part what I was saying. But misunderstanding is also how analogies break. No, matter, a book either sounds interesting and one reads it, or one does not. I can’t force anyone to read. Nor will I explain another’s work. Cheers!
 

pderousse

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Since the codex format replaced the scroll, and is in turn replaced by the scrolling screen, we are enjoying a kind of methodological palindrome.

But if you are going to throw a book at a thread, then circumscribe further discussion of your ideas/conclusions drawn from it or with anyone responding to same, that's not much better than a post-and-run.
Not quite a palindrome: the UI turned only 90 degrees. Regardless, my idea was just to reassure when I replied to Mikig who stated they were "concerned" and "I tend to forget more easily" when reading a screen. The book reference was meant to reassure that it is a pretty well studied phenomenon. So part of the analogy is physical text : deeper comprehension :: vinyl : ? Whether others wish to explore that and complete the anology to something about vinyl, I do not know, but I do find it interesting that in both cases we are talking about a media recension. I'm here for you if you really want to talk books, etc. elsewhere, but I'm sensitive to diverting from the OP, so no not a post and run.
 

IPunchCholla

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And what percentage of the world’s populatio could read, write, have access to media to the learn practical activities, over the timescal required to “evolve”? It’s just not the case. Only a privileged or selected member minority had access to such things, and they had to be invented and developed first.

For society yes, they are important and they were more prevalent in urban society and later democratised to a greater or lesser extent.

As for analogies, where we often learn most is in how they break, or so I find.
Genetic mutations, when highly beneficial, can spread through populations very fast. I believe there is current research showing that lactose tolerance spread within just a few generations in European populations prehistorically, allowing for major cultural shifts.
 

Newman

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That would only happen if almost everyone who couldn’t read or write starved to death. It’s easy to see how that could happen in European winters with lactose intolerance. Special case not general case.
 
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