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Any good active speakers that play LOUD?

Nice 15" woofer and mid too... nice...
Wow,I just saw the price there...
14.000 in US each,18500 a pair in UK!
 
The M2 suggestion is a good one, but the speakers require noisy fan cooled amps or heroic measures. They are also fairly large.

My HT will easily do what you want with your added subs. Meyer Sound Ultra-X20 are quite compact and in a residential setting have unlimited output capability.
Use of a fanless BSS processor such as BSS-160 or other model that has the M2 tunings and your own amps is pretty straight forward. Or if in a multi channel setting, a JBL SDP-75 or Storm ISP MK1/2/3 Processor would also do the trick.
 
They're passive. :)
No, they require dsp with a outboard amp.
They're just not built in..

The M2 suggestion is a good one, but the speakers require noisy fan cooled amps or heroic measures. They are also fairly large.
Only with the Crown amps. They also offer a step up to a Synthesis Mark Levinson amp system that I don't believe are fan'd?
There's a ton of info out there on how to DIY EQ them with whatever you choose.
Large is good. :p
 
Hopefully I don't get roasted for this one...

I currently have a pair of Klipsch Forte III's that have served well for my purposes. After some comments to a post I made recently, I'm considering upgrading them, specifically with active speakers - if I can find a pair that fit my needs. I have fairly particular listening habits that occasionally involve very high output levels (please see below).** My first pair of speakers were LS50's (rated at 106 dB). They sounded incredible (much better than the Fortes), but they were categorically not loud enough (I fed them 300W from a Peachtree Nova and blew out both drivers - it was a learning experience). I like the idea of the new LS60 wireless, but with a rating of 111 dB I don't know if that will be enough of an improvement. Are there other actives I should consider?

FWIW, I will be adding two Rythmik F12's soon, and high pass the mains.

Backup question: if there aren't actives that fit the bill, what passives might be a good choice? I'm tempted to splurge on a pair of used Reference 5's (non-Meta; 116 dB I think) which would hopefully be the last speaker upgrade I make for a long time. Obviously, I would be absolutely certain to not make the same mistake I did with the LS50's.

**So as not to be mistaken for a college kid throwing parties, I should elaborate... I generally lie on the floor or couch, eyes closed, with the music loud enough to nearly block all other sensory perception. It's a stimming thing and it helps me stay grounded and present. SQ is important, and minimizing distortion is critical as it's a distraction that takes me out of the moment. I don't know what the dB actually are when I listen, but 'EDM concert level' sounds about right (it usually ramps up over the session, and I'm guessing it peaks a little over 100 dB? I really don't know). Most would probably consider the volume either uncomfortable or simply obnoxious. I limit sessions to 20-30 minutes for a couple of obvious reasons.

Idk. Maybe this is a situation where horn-loaded Klipsch speakers are the best choice.
Will 130dB enough to make you deaf?

 
" I don't know what the dB actually are when I listen, but 'EDM concert level' sounds about right (it usually ramps up over the session, and I'm guessing it peaks a little over 100 dB? I really don't know). Most would probably consider the volume either uncomfortable or simply obnoxious. I limit sessions to 20-30 minutes for a couple of obvious reasons."
I am afraid that the title of the next posting may be "What is the most comfortable hearing aid"
 
Probably need a sub or two to take the burden of the LF for high SPL, thus reducing the risk of breaking woofers or hitting limiters too hard. Unless you do have the luxury of affording and situating full sized studio main monitors, of course.
 
They also make active/powered PA speakers.

Today at our company Christmas party I think the DJ was using these. He also had a subwoofer, I'd guess it was 18-inches. The sound quality seemed OK but we were in a warehouse with terrible acoustics. The sub seemed a little loud at times. The main speakers weren't turned-up super-loud (not dance-club volume) but they were loud enough that it was sometimes difficult to converse across the table (at least where I was sitting). I assume they go a lot louder... We weren't dancing, just eating & talking.

I don't know what the dB actually are when I listen,
It might be useful to get an SPL meter. You can get one for under $100 USD. But that can be tricky too because you are normally measuring the A-weighted short-term average. That's great for knowing the loudness but your speakers and amplifiers have to handle the peaks and that depends on the dynamics of the music.

Maybe this is a situation where horn-loaded Klipsch speakers are the best choice.
Horns ARE typically efficient (louder with less power) and in general PA speakers are also efficient (and frequently have horns). But every speaker is a compromise so you are probably sacrificing something... PA and "pro" subwoofers usually sacrifice deep bass. They are usually tuned to go-down to about 40Hz, which is low enough for the lowest note on a standard bass guitar and low enough for bass you can feel in your body.
 
117db continuous/1 meter.
No joke.
Yeah, the 150s get bullshit terrifying levels of loud without complaint. It's impressive.
 
Meyer Sound Amie plus Sub

The seem to be in your budget.
Meyer Sound is somewhat known for sound quality and high SPL. I personally like them.
 
PA active speakers + HT subs can be extremely loud, for example:


FEATURES​

  • Up to 135 dB Sound Pressure Level
  • 2100W Class-D Bi-Amplification
  • 45-20000 Hz linear frequency response
  • 4" Titanium/Neodymium Compression Driver
  • 15" Neodymium Woofer
  • FiRPHASE zero degrees phase technology
  • Bass Motion Control woofer excursion management
 
" I don't know what the dB actually are when I listen, but 'EDM concert level' sounds about right (it usually ramps up over the session, and I'm guessing it peaks a little over 100 dB? I really don't know). Most would probably consider the volume either uncomfortable or simply obnoxious. I limit sessions to 20-30 minutes for a couple of obvious reasons."
I am afraid that the title of the next posting may be "What is the most comfortable hearing aid"
The risk of hearing loss is a function of exposure over time. OSHA recommend limiting exposure at 100 dBA to 120 minutes, and that time is halved for every 5 dBA increase. Nonetheless, as another suggested, investing in a sound meter isn't a bad idea.
 
Hopefully I don't get roasted for this one...

I currently have a pair of Klipsch Forte III's that have served well for my purposes. After some comments to a post I made recently, I'm considering upgrading them, specifically with active speakers - if I can find a pair that fit my needs. I have fairly particular listening habits that occasionally involve very high output levels (please see below).** My first pair of speakers were LS50's (rated at 106 dB). They sounded incredible (much better than the Fortes), but they were categorically not loud enough (I fed them 300W from a Peachtree Nova and blew out both drivers - it was a learning experience). I like the idea of the new LS60 wireless, but with a rating of 111 dB I don't know if that will be enough of an improvement. Are there other actives I should consider?

FWIW, I will be adding two Rythmik F12's soon, and high pass the mains.

Backup question: if there aren't actives that fit the bill, what passives might be a good choice? I'm tempted to splurge on a pair of used Reference 5's (non-Meta; 116 dB I think) which would hopefully be the last speaker upgrade I make for a long time. Obviously, I would be absolutely certain to not make the same mistake I did with the LS50's.

**So as not to be mistaken for a college kid throwing parties, I should elaborate... I generally lie on the floor or couch, eyes closed, with the music loud enough to nearly block all other sensory perception. It's a stimming thing and it helps me stay grounded and present. SQ is important, and minimizing distortion is critical as it's a distraction that takes me out of the moment. I don't know what the dB actually are when I listen, but 'EDM concert level' sounds about right (it usually ramps up over the session, and I'm guessing it peaks a little over 100 dB? I really don't know). Most would probably consider the volume either uncomfortable or simply obnoxious. I limit sessions to 20-30 minutes for a couple of obvious reasons.

Idk. Maybe this is a situation where horn-loaded Klipsch speakers are the best choice.
As you discovered, the LS50's can't handle even close to 106db output in the bass region and mind you that rating is for SPL levels at just 1meter.
I don't know how big your room is, mine would drop that SPL about 10-12db based off listening distance and then add a few DB back in for various amounts of room gain.

The woofer is small 5.25" with extra carved out for the tweeter waveguide and a very normal( in other words, limited Xmax).

The speaker was likely distorting to high h$ll before they blew so keep that in mind for various reasons.

I don't think the LS50 can play anything below 300hrz at 106 @12feet/3.7meters which is my set-up size. It might not handle anything at all except very brief peaks at that SPL/distance.

I bring this up as the speaker IS capable of much higher output when used in tandem with powered subwoofers and high pass filter on the LS50's to remove the bass. Basically the higher you cross them the more they can output.

A 55hrz crossover is the minimum for any sort of higher SPL but for very loud it is not enough. (even when using full range I have no idea how anyone at all uses these without such a high pass as they not capable of any bass levels below about 60hrz in decently sized room in the farfield, nothing -- it is really just distortion below 55-60hrz)

So anyway, if you crossed them 125-175hrz LR4, to dual subs you could have a very high SPL capable speaker. It will still not compete with pro gear or high SPL horn loaded designs but they can play very loudly(- essentially making a three way speaker. Even just Plop the LS50's down on the Subwoofers to look just like some 3way designs out there. )

This could be done with many 2 way speakers.
The main limitation typically is can the tweeter handle the power as some systems that are designed for less than high SPL use either a cheap tweeter or crossover point that is low for high SPL for said tweeter.

The difference with active speakers is that even when crossed/high passed the internal amps may just not have enough power. Some designs were never intended for high output at farfield distances.

You ought to be measuring your SPL levels. Since you did not hear the LS50 woofers giving out that might be a bad sign for your hearing. ( possibly there was little indication, but I would start checking your levels) Especially as low distortion design sgive much less indication of the actual SPL. Some sound so clean you don't realize the SPL until you try and talk and it is just mouths moving and noting else below the SPL of the audio.

I have several speakers here(and have had others) that are 2-way monitors that can play louder with more ease than the LS50metas when high passed properly.
For high output levels, nearly all 5/5.25" woofers need to be crossed at 125 or higher and nearly any 6/6.5" at 90-120hrz.
You can get by with 90-100 for a 5" and 70-80hrz for a 6.5" if the high output levels are happening in a smaller sized room.(or even lower if the room is very small)

When crossed at 125hrz even the budget priced JBL 530 can easily out play the KEF at extreme volumes. Right now when I really want loud, I would set -up my JBL 4309's crossed at 90hrz LR4 to several subwoofers. They can handle extremely high SPL with no sign at all of any strain. These speakers also sound quite refined despite the published issues in the frequency response. There is zero chance I would chose the LS50meta's over them and I have both sets of speakers here.

Sticking with smaller than floor stander you could Try Tekton Impact Monitors.
Check out Arendal's 2 woofer monitors.
You could also try the JBL L100 which I am told can handle astonishing SPL levels and sound very good in the process.
I am told the JBL 4349 can play so loudly it is silly and yet for the genre (horn/waveguided loaded tanks) are superbly refined sounding, much more than the Klipsch set you have.

Active wise, I believe the JBL 708p is known for high out capability. I am sure the big Genelec's can do it as long as they are high passed at least out of the lowest bass. Just stick to systems known for high output levels in the farfield.

Anyway you are going to add subs but keep in mind that if you do cross any speakers in above about 100hrz that you need to set things up appropriately for that type of arrangement.
 
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The risk of hearing loss is a function of exposure over time. OSHA recommend limiting exposure at 100 dBA to 120 minutes, and that time is halved for every 5 dBA increase. Nonetheless, as another suggested, investing in a sound meter isn't a bad idea.
There is a nice thread on this here, but you should not take the OSHA recommendation as being adequate to protect your hearing - they were developed for an industrial setting and result in people with substantial hearing loss by the end of their career.

Please take a browse of that thread and give it some consider. You can do measurements from an iPhone conveniently.
 
Use of a fanless BSS processor such as BSS-160 or other model that has the M2 tunings and your own amps is pretty straight forward. Or if in a multi channel setting, a JBL SDP-75 or Storm ISP MK1/2/3 Processor would also do the trick.
Only with the Crown amps. They also offer a step up to a Synthesis Mark Levinson amp system that I don't believe are fan'd?
There's a ton of info out there on how to DIY EQ them with whatever you choose.
Not going with the Crown amps is more trouble, more costly, and what I meant by "heroic measures". Most of the BSS and Synthesis processors are also fan cooled with noisy fans. Member @pos has created profiles that can be used with third party DSPs which can be used, but again, all of these solutions complicate the setup.

While a pair of M2s will likely achieve what the OP has suggested he needs, I agree with all of the choices leaning towards pro-audio. Most consumer speakers will play loudly, but will have more dynamic compression, may be prone to failure, and will likely distort. The OP's older Klipsch speakers while designed for domestic use are more like pro speakers than they are like LS50s or even typical hi-fi speakers with a stack of 6" cones.
 
Hi

First question:
What is the budget?
I noticed the OP was thinking about the Kef LS60...
Few speakers in this price range ($8.000.oo/pair) are capable of clean low distortion, 100 dB+ output at 4 meters ..
...
Happy holidays
Peace
 
Hi

First question:
What is the budget?
I noticed the OP was thinking about the Kef LS60...
Few speakers in this price range ($8.000.oo/pair) are capable of clean low distortion, 100 dB+ output at 4 meters ..
...
Happy holidays
Peace
He will be using a high pass and subwoofers so actually there are a pretty good supply of speakers that can handle the situation.
 
Hi

the OP mentioned EDM Concert Level... I'd guess 110 dB at the listening postion? Full range ... That wouldn't be Genelec 8361 territory but 1238 or 1236. He would need speakers capable of 120 dB + at 1 meter.. That is not something one gets with simply crossing over to a pair of Rythmik Home subwoofers and calling it a day.
I would suggest and there, the budget is at least 5 times the Kef LS60...
  • JBL M2 with a pair of JBL SUB 18... put the Crown amplifers in a cabinet, in most cases the fan would not be running. When they would the general SPL would mask them.
  • Genelec 1238 or 1236A.. again, serious budget.

No! the Kii3 + BXT can't touch these. Nor would most any home or studio-centric speaker systems, The Rythmik subwoofers would not cut it either.. Think pair of JTR Captivator or Danley DTS-10 subwoofers . then you are talking that kind of language... for "EDM-converts levels".. and mains capable of keeping up with these subwoofers.. that wouldn't be the 8361 or similar...
my $0.02.

Happy holidays

Peace.
 
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