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Industry Insiders And Their Nonsense

rdenney

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(Haven't made it past the first page yet.)

It's people who live in small spaces who are killing hi-fi? Hm. My first "good" stereo was a Technics belt-drive turntable (100% manual), a Kenwood integrated amplifier with about 40 watts of output into 8 ohms, and a pair of Advent loudspeakers. I'm sure I'm not alone in starting out that way. The target for that system was to be reasonably linear--that is--signal going in looks the same coming out except bigger.

I didn't buy that system to impress my friends in the college dorm, obviously. I listened to prog rock and classical music: certainly not the preferred musical flavors in Walton Hall at Texas A&M University in 1977. But good sound is good sound, and by the standards of the day that system represented about the highest bang for the buck one could hope for. I had a "godfather" (really a friend of my grandmother) who wrote hi-fi articles for the Houston Chronicle for a time, and he pronounced my choices sound without regard for its modest price--it was about performance, not status. In those days, the objective was good sound, even if not turned up particularly loud (though it was certainly louder than 75 dBA on the peaks!).

I note that even headphone listeners can want and appreciate a good sound, and even headphone listeners can create these highly snobbish and elistist cliques where actual performance is derided in favor of brand value and display of wealth and sound that can only be described using florid adjectives. It's not about small scales or the lack of specialized listening rooms. It's about snobbish elitism invalidating those who are unable or unwilling to spend lavishly in order to get sound that isn't good, but that has the right accent. That is what will kill hi-fi.

Rick "sees it in other luxury product areas, too" Denney
 

egellings

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That is true with every young generation. We had "walkman" and then "discman" when I was younger. Now it's cellphones and i-phones and earbuds. But we also had a ritual at home. On Saturday nights the family would gather in the living room, dad would play some LP from his collection and we would just sit around and talk while listening to music. That made me appreciate good sound reproduction, something that has stayed with me all my life to this day.
I (76years old now) was never exposed to music at all as a child by my foster parents; they simply did not care about music at all. There was not even a table radio in the flat. They did watch TV, and that was it. None of the shows were musical in nature. I was placed in a different foster home, and that's when I first heard music. So here I am, an audio crazie with mostly home-brewed equipment.
 

gsp1971

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I note Rick Denney's comment but I also have to add the following: I don't think that the younger generation's lack of interest in hi-fi has to do with either
(a) lack of space (as Rick Denney said you can get good sounding hi-fi in a dorm room. you can also get a decent sounding desktop system next to your PC), or
(b) lack of money (most of these youngsters have expensive phones anyway)

I think it has to do with other things, namely:
(a) noone has taught them or showed them what a great experience it is to listen to a well-recorded album on a good system,
(b) their phone is their most valuable asset, they use it for everything, calls, SMS, viber, internet, news, music streaming, etc., and
(c) a general change in society, examples;
  • people in the sports business complain that there is a decline in youngsters' interest in sports compared to past decades (I know this is a true fact in European Football [soccer] and Formula One racing);
  • once in a while, I play American pool in my neighborhood club. I have been going there for 30 years, so I know the owners. They complain that young people are not interested in pool these days, like the previous generation was.
  • my son plays football at the local academy. he enjoys it. yet whenever there is a good game on TV and I ask him to join me in watching it, he gets bored within 15 minutes, especially if no goal is scored early in the game.
long story short, youngsters these days are not interested in sports, or pool, or hi-fi, or cars, or books, or politics, or anything that the previous generation was interested in. What do they really care about? Expensive phones, online gaming, and social media. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc. A parallel reality, where they make 'friends' and feel they belong.

I enjoy pouring myself a drink, sitting on my sofa and just relax listening to jazz. To a youngster, this is boring. It is too 'slow'.

They are used to a 'faster' pace through social media and online gaming.

Society has changed. It is the sign of the times.
 
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gsp1971

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I (76years old now) was never exposed to music at all as a child by my foster parents; they simply did not care about music at all. There was not even a table radio in the flat. They did watch TV, and that was it. None of the shows were musical in nature. I was placed in a different foster home, and that's when I first heard music. So here I am, an audio crazie with mostly home-brewed equipment.
Noted. But you must have gotten your stimulus from somewhere.
 

computer-audiophile

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I enjoy pouring myself a drink, sitting on my sofa and just relax listening to jazz. To a youngster, this is boring. It is too 'slow'.

They are used to a 'faster' pace through social media and online gaming.

Society has changed. It is the sign of the times.
I'd say that's a good observation.
 

egellings

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Noted. But you must have gotten your stimulus from somewhere.
I did. The second foster home did it for the music. As for the equipment enjoyment, I was always innately fascinated by electronic stuff. No one I knew had any dealings with things electronic. I think what kicked that off was the ol' floor-standing radio, a Philco model with a pull-out tray that had a turntable mounted on it. I'd peer in the back of it and wonder how those glowing bulbs and that round thing near the bottom could sound like someone was in there.
 

Sal1950

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long story short, youngsters these days are not interested in sports, or pool, or hi-fi, or cars, or books, or politics, or anything that the previous generation was interested in. What do they really care about? Expensive phones, online gaming, and social media. Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc. A parallel reality, where they make 'friends' and feel they belong.
Very true and not something I can relate to at all
It seems their whole world is about having their face buried in that damn phone. :facepalm:
All the while they're missing out on being connected & involved in the real world.
Its just nuts IMHO
 

computer-audiophile

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Very true and not something I can relate to at all
It seems their whole world is about having their face buried in that damn phone. :facepalm:
All the while they're missing out on being connected & involved in the real world.
Its just nuts IMHO
This time I'm right there with you Sal.

The phenomenon of today's youth being centered around smartphones began with the advent of personal computers and their screens. Initially, I found it fascinating. Little did I know that today, in every office, factory, studio, and household, people are fixated solely on screens. With smartphones, it has even evolved into gazing at tiny screens, acting as windows to an artificial world. I am grateful for having grown up differently and for not forgetting the myriad of activities and experiences beyond the confines of a screen.
 

AdrianusG

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In all my years of audiofoolery, slumming the hi-fi shows, wandering the audio salons, dealing with dealers, trading with traders, I've never encountered an enthused woman. At the stores I've seen guys walking in with their wives, who immediately proceed to stand in the background looking bored, as husbands abandon them for gear.

Waifu, whom I dearly love, would just as soon listen to whatever she is listening to on one of her multiple cell phones or tablets (she likes those, for some reason). But if I turn on one of our multi-thousand dollar hi-fi systems she nods indifferently, smiles at me because I am happy, and then retreats to some or another room of the house.

I have a female friend who is an accomplished classical pianist. She recently sent me a file (she called it a 'tape') of a Chopin piece. Nice performance, yet it sounded pretty bad sonically. Her perplexed reply? "It sounded great when I was playing it!"
"At the stores I've seen guys walking in with their wives, who immediately proceed to stand in the background looking bored, as husbands abandon them for gear."

Well this is basically the same as what "us Men" do when we walk (with our wives) into a clothes or Shoe shop ain't it?, i know I am.
 

anmpr1

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"At the stores I've seen guys walking in with their wives, who immediately proceed to stand in the background looking bored, as husbands abandon them for gear."

Well this is basically the same as what "us Men" do when we walk (with our wives) into a clothes or Shoe shop ain't it?, i know I am.

The best women's stores have a chair by the dressing room, where husbands can sit so they don't have to stand while they wait.
 

computer-audiophile

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The best women's stores have a chair by the dressing room, where husbands can sit so they don't have to stand while they wait.
I like to go shopping in chic boutiques with my wife and have already discovered one or two beautiful pieces for her that she had overlooked. Recently she has been ordering a lot online and sends almost everything back. A stupid development.
 

gsp1971

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This time I'm right there with you Sal.

The phenomenon of today's youth being centered around smartphones began with the advent of personal computers and their screens. Initially, I found it fascinating. Little did I know that today, in every office, factory, studio, and household, people are fixated solely on screens. With smartphones, it has even evolved into gazing at tiny screens, acting as windows to an artificial world. I am grateful for having grown up differently and for not forgetting the myriad of activities and experiences beyond the confines of a screen.
Very true.

That has even further consequences: the young colleagues (25-35) we have at work are not very social and have trouble dealing with certain situations when it comes to soft skills at the office. But I am not sure whether this applies to most young people in that age group, not sure I can generalize.

Having said that, I do use a PC at work. But I don't have a Facebook account, nor Twitter, nor Instagram. Generally I am not very interested in social media. And my smartphone is a fairly cheap Motorola, under $200. I would NEVER spend $1000 - $1200 on a phone, when for the same amount of money I can get the KEF LS50 Meta :)
 

egellings

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Very true.

That has even further consequences: the young colleagues (25-35) we have at work are not very social and have trouble dealing with certain situations when it comes to soft skills at the office. But I am not sure whether this applies to most young people in that age group, not sure I can generalize.

Having said that, I do use a PC at work. But I don't have a Facebook account, nor Twitter, nor Instagram. Generally I am not very interested in social media. And my smartphone is a fairly cheap Motorola, under $200. I would NEVER spend $1000 - $1200 on a phone, when for the same amount of money I can get the KEF LS50 Meta :)
Same for me. I have an inexpensive but reliable flip-phone with a little keypad on it, and it works just fine as a phone, where 'phone' implies sound, not video. Saved money is just that; saved for some future need or want.
 
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