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Genelec GLM Review (Room EQ & Setup)

Tangband

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I have been using room correction for nearly 20 years, and back then there was only TACT and DEQX. The DEQX has been my weapon of choice (and has served me well)--I favor the philosophy of first EQ'ing the driver response at 1 meter with phase correction, and then and only then judiciously applying room EQ. Anyhow I have been looking for something newer, and between REW, Audiolense, Acourate, MiniDSP using Dirac, etc. it would be a great gift to have a shoot out of sorts. From Mitch's comments, I gather that as much as I like the Acourate approach, the sheer tedium is a huge turnoff. Nor am I inclined to buy a product where the forum is the owners manual.

Wouldn't be lovely to have an $1800. killer unit that could accommodate say a stereo 3 way active speaker with crossovers, a lot of built in automation, have a near SOTA DAC and both balanced, unbalanced, and digital outs all with 24/192 capability? Along of course with all out assault for audio only with whatever latency is required filter bank that is switchable to a more humble video choice filter set that keeps it synced. While we are at it offer modules/licenses for all the room EQ standards such as Dirac.
Measuring about 1 m from the loudspeaker ( only one at a time ) correcting individual drivers with eq is the correct way to do it - agree.

Theres a lot of confusion here, people trying to correct things from the listening place at 500 Hz or even higher in frequency using two loudspeakers at the same time which is a sure way to get worse sound .
Adysseus and such is not the way to get good sound .

I think DEQX is still the highend choice in active dsp loudspeakers with built in digital crossover . But ofcourse one also has to have a good measurement microphone and measure the right things to get good sound.

In the Genelec SAM cases , digital crossover and individual corrections of drivers is already done in the loudspeaker .

GLM is for the room , and correcting fundamental room resonances ( not reflections ) lower than 80 Hz is always beneficial.
 
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hege

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Yes, but one can start small. API for just volume control would not be rocket science nor introduce major risks to the software.

There are two completely different scenarios:

- Offer some network API to a running GLM software (easy, but requires GLM always running)
- Offer low-level USB API to the GLM box (so you can plug it into a linux box and do something without official GLM software)

The latter would be much more difficult to provide specifications and support for. It's not a case of "just providing volume control", as it requires understanding the whole protocol anyway.

First solution could be practical, if they provided Linux version of GLM. And even better, a pure command line version.
 

blamphos

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The situation might change in the future due Genelec has been penetrating to the home market segment quite heavily over last years. I'm very confident that they have addressed this demand, but maybe they have not publish any API yet simply because if there is not enough bandwidth in customer support to help all home automation builders.
 

blamphos

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Thomas Lund

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Yes, the masterplan resides in GLM so large systems can be controlled with simple commands.
 

pozz

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If using subwoofers from a third party company, does GLM have options for HPFs per speaker?
 

Trell

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If using subwoofers from a third party company, does GLM have options for HPFs per speaker?

I tried to enable HPF on one pair of 8330A but was unable to do that from the GLM 4 software. The SAM monitors supports it, though, so perhaps Genelec could add that feature.

The slope of the HPF is pretty steep at 48 dB/octave.
 

Tonygeno

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Has anyone run the new GLM 4.1 and compared it to 4.0? What are the benefits, if any? The one negative (for me) of GLM is that you need to connect all the speakers up via Ethernet, which is time consuming, particularly compared to Dirac.
 

Trell

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Has anyone run the new GLM 4.1 and compared it to 4.0? What are the benefits, if any? The one negative (for me) of GLM is that you need to connect all the speakers up via Ethernet, which is time consuming, particularly compared to Dirac.

You can have filters with a positive gain and a low shelf with a positive gain. For the Ones there are other features added as well.

There are firmware updates required for the monitors/subwoofers as well as the GLM Kit.

You’ll have to read the release notes for 4.1 and 4.1.1 for more information.
 

QueueCumber

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You can have filters with a positive gain and a low shelf with a positive gain. For the Ones there are other features added as well.

There are firmware updates required for the monitors/subwoofers as well as the GLM Kit.

You’ll have to read the release notes for 4.1 and 4.1.1 for more information.
Totally new to Genelec and GLM. I'm trying to set up a pair of 8341s and Genelec sub. I have the ethernet cables all connected and I set up a group and did the initial EQs.

Is there something else that has to be hooked up to get audio playback from Windows 10 to run through the 8341s? I'm looking to use the setup to listen to PC audio (iTunes, games, etc, on PC).

Thanks!
 

stevenswall

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Totally new to Genelec and GLM. I'm trying to set up a pair of 8341s and Genelec sub. I have the ethernet cables all connected and I set up a group and did the initial EQs.

Is there something else that has to be hooked up to get audio playback from Windows 10 to run through the 8341s? I'm looking to use the setup to listen to PC audio (iTunes, games, etc, on PC).

Thanks!

You need to connect the speakers to your source with XLR. The GLM network doesn't do anything as far as taking audio over USB to the speakers. It's only for calibration and control.
 

Spocko

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You need to connect the speakers to your source with XLR. The GLM network doesn't do anything as far as taking audio over USB to the speakers. It's only for calibration and control.
Or digital output via AES/EBU (would require a PCI card) which is what I have from RME.
 

DigiPete

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Totally new to Genelec and GLM. I'm trying to set up a pair of 8341s and Genelec sub. I have the ethernet cables all connected and I set up a group and did the initial EQs.

Is there something else that has to be hooked up to get audio playback from Windows 10 to run through the 8341s? I'm looking to use the setup to listen to PC audio (iTunes, games, etc, on PC).

Thanks!

Consider getting something like a TOPPING D10S DAC with a S/PDIF out (approx 110 €/$)
The Genelecs will take S/PDIF on the EAS/EBU input with a converter cable.

Note the cable should be max 2m long.
If longer, just get a Neutrik NADIT BNC-M 75 Ohm BNC (unbalanced) input to 3-pin XLR (balanced) 110 Ohm converter (€45 or so).
AND get the right cables! - Ask if you need to.
RCA and XLR cables should be for data - not analogue.

This works like a charm on Genelecs, I can't say for other applications . . .
It creates a fully digital chain into the Genelecs (into sub's first for X-over, then on to the monitors).
And you'll have a fegging awesome system!
 
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Walter

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Consider getting something like a TOPPING D10S DAC with a S/PDIF out (approx 110 €/$)
The Genelecs will take S/PDIF on the EAS/EBU input with a converter cable.

Note the cable should be max 2m long.
If longer, just get a Neutrik NADIT BNC-M 75 Ohm BNC (unbalanced) input to 3-pin XLR (balanced) 110 Ohm converter (€45 or so).
AND get the right cables! - Ask if you need to.
RCA and XLR cables should be for data - not analogue.

This works like a charm on Genelecs, I can't say for other applications . . .
It creates a fully digital chain into the Genelecs (into sub's first for X-over, then on to the monitors).
And you'll have a fegging awesome system!
If @QueueCumber has a computer with an S/PDIF output, as is common on desktops, is there any reason a D10 would be needed? I can't think of one, but I have never used Genelecs.
 

Trell

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If @QueueCumber has a computer with an S/PDIF output, as is common on desktops, is there any reason a D10 would be needed? I can't think of one, but I have never used Genelecs.

Today I would think that TOSLINK is much more common than coax on desktop computers, and Genelec does not have TOSLINK input.

But if he has coax it could be worth a try.
 

Walter

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Today I would think that TOSLINK is much more common than coax on desktop computers, and Genelec does not have TOSLINK input.

But if he has coax it could be worth a try.
True, it is--and I didn't know what the input was, so good point. However, He could still use a converter like this one, that would be both cheaper and simpler. The great thing about digital in this case is that there is no risk of degraded sound from a cheap converter--it will either work, fail intermittently and be obvious, or not work at all. Of course, if he's using a laptop or an office-grade desktop, there will be no S/PDIF output to begin with.
 

DigiPete

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Genelecs will take S/PDIF in the form of XLR into the AES/EBU port, but easily solvable with a short (2m max) converter cable.
 

srrxr71

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I used this: https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/367655-REG/Canare_BCJXPTRB_BCJ_XP_TRB_75_Ohm_to.html

Plus a cable from blue jeans audio coax to bnc 75 ohm. Mogami gold to the sub and monitors.

Topping D10B just in case I want to use analog while playing DSD or higher than 24/192.

Blusound node to capture audio from HDMI sources. Outputs USB to the Topping D10B.

Cable matters USB RF remote USB switch to allow for USB from PC, MAC, Node and iPad/iPhone/android etc.

The Genelec wired volume knob.

This setup makes it very domestically friendly. Gives me all possible options for 2 channel.
 
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KaLam1ty

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Genelecs will take S/PDIF in the form of XLR into the AES/EBU port, but easily solvable with a short (2m max) converter cable.
Perhaps this is a dumb question, but if I'm going about this solution (no transformer and SPDIF into AES), would I only need to worry about the length of the first interconnect between the Source and 1st monitor? Or should I also be considering the entire length of the chain, from Source -> monitor 1 -> monitor 2?

I wasn't sure if the monitor's Thru-Digi Out meant there wasn't some kind of buffer (if such a thing is even needed?). Mainly asking since my new listening setup will be quite large and wide, with the monitors approx. 12ft apart and the first source connection approx. 3ft.
 
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