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Buckeye Amps: New US based Hypex multichannel amplifier builder, line-up announcement!

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Buckeye Amps

Buckeye Amps

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Thread Starter #401
Now you tell me.... ;)
I apologize. I literally did not have this idea on a back burner of any sort. I was in the designer software the other day looking at the cost of switching from aluminum to Cold Rolled Steel for my cases (in order to bolster the support/rigidity of the top panel since I can't make it thicker) and found myself playing with their Rack Mount case design file. And after seeing the work it took for you to adapt my case (which is robust and looks good to me for being put into a rack), I figured I'd ballpark a case if I did an order of 10 at a time and it was only $100 more. Once I add the cutouts to the file it might go up another $20 or so.
 

thegeton

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Does anybody know the length of the Ghent Audio NC502MP case with an XLR cable plugged into the back? I'm trying to fit an amp on a shelf that is 14.25 inches deep with a glass front. Deciding between the Ghent option and the 12x12 Buckeye option.
I just measured mine and got ~16 inches from the front edge of the front plate to the rear of the largest bend in the balanced cables exiting the XLR connectors. You may get something different if you're using larger diameter cables as the bend radius typically increases with an increase in cable diameter.
 
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I just measured mine and got ~16 inches from the front edge of the front plate to the rear of the largest bend in the balanced cables exiting the XLR connectors. You may get something different if you're using larger diameter cables as the bend radius typically increases with an increase in cable diameter.
Hmm ok. That's just a touch too long for my cabinet (just less than 15 inches from rear wall to glass door). Looks like I'll probably be going with the NC252MP in a Ghent case once I get around to buying a new amp. Thanks for your help!
 

thegeton

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What is your process for burning in electronics? Does it change depending on type of device?
Yes, it definitely depends on the type of electronics in question. This whole process would be done in a more methodical and precision measured fashion if it were performed in a real-world design or manufacturing environment.

I’ll use my new Buckeye amp as an example. Note: I'm not running a formal burn in process, but I like to do mine in a few basic steps:

(1) Visual inspection and acclimation – make sure everything looks as it should as you allow the temperature of the DUT to come up to room temp. In my garage that’s about 65 F.
(2) Power up with no load and observe for a short period of time.
(3) Power down, connect an expendable source and load. Double check that everything is connected per the UG (if available). Double check that the source input signal is set to zero or minimal.
(4) Power up and observe for a short period of time.
(5) Slowly raise the source signal level until you get a meaningful response from the load and hold there. Without a meter or test equipment to determine the actual signal level, you have to use your best judgement. I try not to piss off my wife and neighbors. Periodically check the case temp (use your hand if you don’t have a non-contact thermometer) and relative output from the load.
(6) Hold that signal level for 8-12 hrs. If after that time you have no concerns, you’re probably good to go.

Hope that helps!
 
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I apologize. I literally did not have this idea on a back burner of any sort. I was in the designer software the other day looking at the cost of switching from aluminum to Cold Rolled Steel for my cases (in order to bolster the support/rigidity of the top panel since I can't make it thicker) and found myself playing with their Rack Mount case design file. And after seeing the work it took for you to adapt my case (which is robust and looks good to me for being put into a rack), I figured I'd ballpark a case if I did an order of 10 at a time and it was only $100 more. Once I add the cutouts to the file it might go up another $20 or so.
For those following along to the rack mount discussion, the ~$100 extra for the heavier gauge steel in the case with the ears, screws, and such is worth it. What I did is going to work just fine, but the effort to get there for most won't be worth saving the $100.

BTW, my rack is a communications equipment rack. It's a bit different than the normal AV 19" rack. The widest a piece of equipment can be and still fit between my rack rails is 17.5". Just be sure you check your dimensions before ordering...
 
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Buckeye Amps

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Thread Starter #406
The Rack Mount case I would be using is advertised as a true 19" fit, meaning 19" front panel for screwing into the rails and a smaller body (inside dimensions are 16.5", so I believe the overall outside dimensions are right around 17.5" wide....will confirm when finalized)
 
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Buckeye Amps

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Thread Starter #407
I have also decided to revamp my standard case offerings, mainly by shrinking the three sizes down, especially the 2 channel case I carry. I will also be switching from aluminum to steel to add a little more rigidity (at the cost of being heavier).

The question: for the smallest case, is it generally preferred to have a skinny case that is deep or a fat case that isn't as deep?
 

Matias

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The question: for the smallest case, is it generally preferred to have a skinny case that is deep or a fat case that isn't as deep?
Skinny deep, the width of typical DACs, about 23 cm / 9 inches.
 
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Thread Starter #410
I want to try to get down to a somewhat Ghent sized case for single 252/502 (dual purpose). Then a medium case for dual 252/502 (so maybe 14" wide). Then a large case to still do the triple 502s and triple/quad 252s...I want to try to get the largest case down to 17.5" max external width.

Nothing else about the case will change (same cutouts, exhaust slats). Only other change I am looking at is switching to steel with same powder coat finish. Will add about twice the empty case weight as the aluminum ones now but would help alleviate any type of sag on the top panel.

The change to the new cases wouldn't happen til current stock is used up. So probably not til April at the earliest.

I expect to announce the rack mount within the next week.
 
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Thread Starter #413
As of right now, average time of completion is 4wks within order placement. The Ghent case orders are completed upon arrival (as they only take me an hour max to put together). 2 Channel orders (using my cases) I can usually squeeze in to my schedule within 2wks (again, quick assembly).

I do try to leave a leeway slot open each week to accommodate those buyers who absolutely cannot wait (or would otherwise buy from another company to get it quicker).
 

walt99

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Good old needle nose pliers
I love the business model, a small operation can control quality better than many 'manufacturers', (I do plan on ordering a 4 or 6 chan. amp as soon as funds become available).

If I may make a suggestion, if you plan on making a real business out of this, all connector suppliers have recommended tools for crimping which can be found in their catalogs/spec sheets. These tools will create a superior connection as compared to using needle nose pliers and also make the job easier. If you plan on making this more than a hobby it might be worth the investment.

I run an aircraft avionics shop and have a ton of specialized tools specific to crimping, using the proper tool not only makes the job easier but will create a superior connection (reliability is king in my business).

(PS: I actually prefer a soldered connection for audio/low level signals so maybe that's an option but more time consuming)
 
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Buckeye Amps

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Thread Starter #417
I love the business model, a small operation can control quality better than many 'manufacturers', (I do plan on ordering a 4 or 6 chan. amp as soon as funds become available).

If I may make a suggestion, if you plan on making a real business out of this, all connector suppliers have recommended tools for crimping which can be found in their catalogs/spec sheets. These tools will create a superior connection as compared to using needle nose pliers and also make the job easier. If you plan on making this more than a hobby it might be worth the investment.

I run an aircraft avionics shop and have a ton of specialized tools specific to crimping, using the proper tool not only makes the job easier but will create a superior connection (reliability is king in my business).

(PS: I actually prefer a soldered connection for audio/low level signals so maybe that's an option but more time consuming)
I agree on using the proper crimp tool. I should have been a little more specific in my reply (don't want to scare off interested customers who think I'm cutting corners).

For the JST crimp connectors (so the speaker and power connectors on the board) I do use the JST crimp tool.

For all the quick connectors/butt connectors/etc I also properly crimp those with tools.

The only ones I use needle nose pliers on are the J4 and J6 connectors (the rectangular ones I thought the OP meant). This is because I have yet to find an official crimp tool since I got these connectors from Ghent directly in bulk. I am working on getting my own supplier for these and will see if they have a specific crimp tool.
However I will say I am still able to crimp them securely enough that I need to use pliers to pull the wire out with force.
 

Rottmannash

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Like others have stated, I LOVE how you're doing this-a great service to those who can't/won't build an amp of this quality and not charging a fortune for it. If you had been offering Purifi modules I'd have bought from you in a nanosecond, or perhaps even a picosecond.
This may be the only form of capitalism that makes me feel good. Congratulations on doing something worthwhile and enjoying it in the process-not a common thing in today's world.
 
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I need a 5 channel amp and understand you only produce even numbers of multi channel amps. Can you address the pros/cons of connecting 5 channels of input to a 6 channel model? I'd also like to know the input sensitivity of your amps. I'd be using a Denon AVR with highest SINAD at 1.1 volts output/clips at 1.5volts output and am trying to make an informed decision about which Hypex module I should use to power my 4 ohm speakers. Thankyou.
 
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Buckeye Amps

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Thread Starter #420
I need a 5 channel amp and understand you only produce even numbers of multi channel amps. Can you address the pros/cons of connecting 5 channels of input to a 6 channel model? I'd also like to know the input sensitivity of your amps. I'd be using a Denon AVR with highest SINAD at 1.1 volts output/clips at 1.5volts output and am trying to make an informed decision about which Hypex module I should use to power my 4 ohm speakers. Thankyou.
From what I know, there really is no negative to using one channel of a two channel module. Audibly I can tell you there is no negative effect (I run my LCR on two NC502 modules, so the center is using one channel of the available two).

The 502's have an input sensitivity of 2.35v and the 252's 1.66v

The 252's will give you 250w @ 4ohms....for most setups/usage this is more power than anyone would need, especially if your speakers have good sensitivity.
 
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