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ZeroSurge 2R15W Surge Protector Review

Rate this surge protector:

  • 1. Poor (headless panther)

    Votes: 49 37.4%
  • 2. Not terrible (postman panther)

    Votes: 33 25.2%
  • 3. Fine (happy panther)

    Votes: 29 22.1%
  • 4. Great (golfing panther)

    Votes: 20 15.3%

  • Total voters
    131
Nothing surprising here. I have used these devices (also similar to Brickwall) and never have I seen any assertion that it will improve 'quality'. That is not its purpose. It is a surge suppressor and it works great. I have never had a surge hurt equipment protected by these while I have other electronics in the same house damaged from the surge that did not have these. I have 1 that is 15+ years old and still works great which makes its yearly cost low. They are not a one time use.
I think some of the confusion comes from the Zero Surge ad copy:

Non-sacrificial filter technology repeatedly suppresses worst case surges and removes EMI/RFI noise disturbances from the power line without wear or degradation to the components

From here: https://zerosurge-com.3dcartstores.com/2R15W_p_12.html
 
Neil Muncy (RIP) on:

The Benefits Of Series Mode Surge Suppression

I don't believe that EMI/RFI filtering is directly part of series mode surge suppression.
 
I think some of the confusion comes from the Zero Surge ad copy:

Non-sacrificial filter technology repeatedly suppresses worst case surges and removes EMI/RFI noise disturbances from the power line without wear or degradation to the components

From here: https://zerosurge-com.3dcartstores.com/2R15W_p_12.html
Thanks for pointing that out. My reading of Amir's test was he was taking the raw power out of the rack. While not pristine, there were no 'disturbances' in this signal, just the typical, all day long, noise. These surge suppressors are not cleaners. I think Amir would need to inject a large high frequency noise component (disturbance) to test the Zero Surge suppression capabilities. Amir uses the word filter but I may not use that word as I read the ad copy is suppressing a surge (disturbance), even in the EMI or RFI range. I consider filtering or power cleaners to be different than dealing with disturbances. I do agree that he term conditioner in the ad copy is not the best word, but I interpreted that word based on what follows. I think Amir's graphs do show some reduction in the high frequency range - perhaps this noise could couple into and interfere with operation of routers, modems, and the like - not sure.
 
Thanks for pointing that out. My reading of Amir's test was he was taking the raw power out of the rack. While not pristine, there were no 'disturbances' in this signal, just the typical, all day long, noise. These surge suppressors are not cleaners. I think Amir would need to inject a large high frequency noise component (disturbance) to test the Zero Surge suppression capabilities. Amir uses the word filter but I may not use that word as I read the ad copy is suppressing a surge (disturbance), even in the EMI or RFI range. I consider filtering or power cleaners to be different than dealing with disturbances. I do agree that he term conditioner in the ad copy is not the best word, but I interpreted that word based on what follows. I think Amir's graphs do show some reduction in the high frequency range - perhaps this noise could couple into and interfere with operation of routers, modems, and the like - not sure.
It's open to interpretation just what they were trying to say. In any event, it doesn't do much, if any filtering, in the sense an EMI/RFI engineer would recognize.
 
Just an FYI as I haven't read the whole thread. The original owner and patent holder, Rudy, told me back in '96 or so that almost all surge-based disruptions to devices in the home are not protected from whole house surge protection because the majority of damage is caused by other devices in the home. We spoke at great length, and he made his bucks consulting to utility companies. not selling his surge protectors. I own many of their devices and the oldest one is from '97 or so, still kicking. They even asked me to send it in so they could test it after 10 years (all on their dime) -- checked out fine. Give Zero Surge's Donna a call (pretty sure she's been the longest term employee and has pretty good tech chops).
 
I think whole house protection is a good idea.But take a look at their comparison of whole house MOVs vs Zero Surge. Is whole house MOV good enough? Maybe, but we get a lot of surges where I live, so I am also using the zero surge on my expensive equipment.
I don't want to divert this discussion too far, but your mention of whole-house surge protection intrigues me. There are some situations where a surge unit (Zero Surge or otherwise) would not work so well, such as protecting an espresso machine on a kitchen counter where water splash is likely. Espresso machines can cost $thousands, so protection is much desired. Seems like a whole-house solution at the junction box may be the answer? Maybe. Don't know for sure. Anyone with knowledge about this option able to opine/recommend? I like the premise of a mode filter option compared to the metal oxide varistor (MOV) form of surge protection, so if only MOV is available as a whole-house solution that would be less than ideal.
 
Seems like a whole-house solution at the junction box may be the answer? Maybe. Don't know for sure. Anyone with knowledge about this option able to opine/recommend?
Surge protection works best at the entrance to the home due to very low impedance of the ground there. This means surges are shunted better than doing the same thing across many feet inside your home. You can get the power company to put one in side the meter. Ours cost about $350. Or you can get an electrician to put one next to your breaker panel. This will naturally cost more.
 
I don't want to divert this discussion too far, but your mention of whole-house surge protection intrigues me. There are some situations where a surge unit (Zero Surge or otherwise) would not work so well, such as protecting an espresso machine on a kitchen counter where water splash is likely. Espresso machines can cost $thousands, so protection is much desired. Seems like a whole-house solution at the junction box may be the answer? Maybe. Don't know for sure. Anyone with knowledge about this option able to opine/recommend? I like the premise of a mode filter option compared to the metal oxide varistor (MOV) form of surge protection, so if only MOV is available as a whole-house solution that would be less than ideal.
I had an electrician install an Intermatic Smart Guard IG2240-IMSK Whole Home Surge Protector when I bought my home:

https://a.co/d/g16MiXU

I liked that it had replaceable modules with indicator lights to let me know if protection is active and whether I need to replace a module or not.
 
I'm not sure how splashing water would cause a high voltage surge. But a GFCI receptacle or breaker would add to human safety.
I didn't get the impression water would create the surge, just that placement of a surge suppressor in a location likely to get water splash was not recommended. I contacted Zero Surge directly and they indicated that would not be appropriate.
 
Surge protection works best at the entrance to the home due to very low impedance of the ground there. This means surges are shunted better than doing the same thing across many feet inside your home. You can get the power company to put one in side the meter. Ours cost about $350. Or you can get an electrician to put one next to your breaker panel. This will naturally cost more.
That is a very interesting option, and frankly one which I had never heard of before. Will definitely follow up with the local power utility. Thank you for the info.
 
That is a very interesting option, and frankly one which I had never heard of before. Will definitely follow up with the local power utility. Thank you for the info.
Bummed. Local power utility doesn't offer the install-at-meter program. Amir is lucky to have it. Checked with Zero Surge and they don't make a whole-house product. Anyone know of a whole-house surge protection device that is not based on MOV? In communicating with Zero Surge they indicated whole-house MOV devices typically have a surge let-through of about 700V-900V. Yikes!
 
Bummed. Local power utility doesn't offer the install-at-meter program. Amir is lucky to have it. Checked with Zero Surge and they don't make a whole-house product. Anyone know of a whole-house surge protection device that is not based on MOV? In communicating with Zero Surge they indicated whole-house MOV devices typically have a surge let-through of about 700V-900V. Yikes!
That is why surge protection needs to be layered. Whole house followed by power strip and finally in the device itself (rare).
 
We couldn't get a whole house unit so we have two Zero Surge units with UPS's behind them for TV + stereo, and PC. We have several MOV units (with indicator light) for less important things. For the least important things we cross our fingers.
 
Alas it doesn't work that way.
A surge protector for 115V will fry it's MOVs on 230V AC. MOVs can only handle very short pulses not a constant trigger.
It needs to be tested with EFT and Surge tests. These use different polarity peaks between L, N and safety ground.
These pulses must be repetitive, short (there are norms for this for various types of equipment, industrial, home, railway, automotive etc) and of a minimum duration.
That requires specific (expensive) test gear.

These devices won't protect against near-by lightning strikes anyway.

Also there is common mode filtering which Amir does not test for.
Common mode noise is a bigger issue than differential mode (what Amir tests for).

These devices do work within the specified range. The MOVs inside can handle a bit more peak currents than the ones used in equipment itself (if it has some).

Would I buy one ? no.
When I want to protect for lightning strikes I would use serious protection where the cable enters the house.
When I have erratic mains with surges and brown/black outs, look for a different solution.
When I want to improve audio.... buy different speakers treat a room.
When I had 'audio gremlins' (ticks, noises, hum) I would try to find out what causes it and address it at the source or look for what is needed to get rid of the noises.
Read more carefully, ZeroSurge does not contain MOVs.
 
Using the unreliable power supplied by ConEdison, I have three ZeroSurge units. During the time I've had them, surges have taken out my big Furman PST strips, but the Zero Surge units and the equipment plugged into them continue to work.

Just an anecdote, I know...
Good to know, I have the same power provider and I am considering upgrading from Furman to ZeroSurge/SurgeX.
 
Bummed. Local power utility doesn't offer the install-at-meter program. Amir is lucky to have it. Checked with Zero Surge and they don't make a whole-house product. Anyone know of a whole-house surge protection device that is not based on MOV? In communicating with Zero Surge they indicated whole-house MOV devices typically have a surge let-through of about 700V-900V. Yikes!
Kellen, if I understood you correctly, SurgeX has what you need:

 
Thanks Reeval! The link your provided went to "whole room" protection. Should I be reading that as "whole house" as discussed above, or is that protection specific to a line?
My pleasure, I think one of the models (PF-420) has a total of 80 amps divided into four 20 amp circuits. I am not sure if this would qualify as a "Whole House", although it would for an apartment.
 
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