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ZeroSurge 2R15W Surge Protector Review

Rate this surge protector:

  • 1. Poor (headless panther)

    Votes: 49 37.4%
  • 2. Not terrible (postman panther)

    Votes: 33 25.2%
  • 3. Fine (happy panther)

    Votes: 29 22.1%
  • 4. Great (golfing panther)

    Votes: 20 15.3%

  • Total voters
    131
A light is better than nothing, but there are models designed to stop passing power when they wear out:

https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/reviews/best-surge-protector/

Contrary to some advice earlier in this thread, they recommend replacing MOV based surge protectors every 2-5 years:
Really depends on the number of over-voltage events it encounters. 2-5 years seems overly aggressive to me for a typical installation with a quality modern strip. I do agree that an auto-shutoff strip is better, especially where the strip is tucked out of view.
 
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Sacrificial (or semi-sacrificial) surge protection is a simple fuse :) They come in many designs, but they are functionally simple devices.

Fuses are overcurrent protection devices and do absolutely nothing for overvoltage conditions.

I feel like this has been discussed in many threads. A fuse is to prevent stuff from catching fire if there's a fault downstream of the fuse that results in high current draw. It has nothing to do with faults upstream of the fuse.
 
This reminds me of my primary rationale for going this route: my house has some old wiring which lacks equipment ground. GFCI breakers help with electrocution safety, but MOV based surge suppression needs a ground wire to shunt surge current to. The series protection doesn’t require a ground. Expensive for a surge protector is still cheaper than rewiring.
Not that I'm any kind of expert but as long as it's a good one then at least it likely isn't doing any harm and potentially cleaning high frequency off the lines which can't be terrible. This paper seems like an intersting primer: https://download.schneider-electric...series-v-parallel.pdf&p_Doc_Ref=SPD-WP-SVPSPD
 
I honestly miss the listening test section. Good power filter and power cables completely change the whole aspects of sound.
 
I honestly miss the listening test section. Good power filter and power cables completely change the whole aspects of sound.
Ha, I know you say in jest, just like your username is apt for that one!
 
Few buy these boxes for that. Instead, the main application I constantly hear is applying them when there is no sign of audible noise.

The best weapon against ground loops is a balanced interconnects.
I'm as stupid as any tube enhanced audio nerd there is and I have no desire to buy this device to improve my audio equipment.
 
In those 45 years, what word or words have you been using for circuits whos job it is to remove unwanted artifacts and improve signal purity? Filter seems like the perfect word, especially if everyone knows exactly what is meant when it is being used this way.... ie in this case, removing unwanted surges from utility power.
Peak clipper, limiter, surge protector. If I see a block diagram and it says "filter", it is a frequency discrimination circuit. I realize layman toss around these words promiscuously, mainly because of creative marketers I suspect. But we're on ASR.
 
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Peak clipper, limiter, surge protector. If I see a block diagram and it says "filter", it is a frequency discrimination circuit. I realize layman toss around these words promiscuously, mainly because of creative marketers I suspect. But we're on ASR.
I would also like to add 'surge suppressor'
 
Does anyone have some rough numbers for the BOM for the EMI/RFI filtering components they add to surge protectors? I've long suspected that the AC filtering aspect is mostly to have a marketing bullet point. If the material cost is very low, I can see the incentive to include it.
It's not necessarily cheap if it's meant for effective filtering to a low frequency at high through currents. To give you an idea, I pay maybe $25 for a small industrial EMI/RFI filter assembly from say, Corcom. So the parts must be a few bucks. That would be good for maybe 5A. They get a lot more expensive from there.

Do audiophiles need them? Usually not. Maybe if you live near an industrial facility that chops a hash on the line.
 
I have a guy, actually. Does great work, and we enjoy each other's company. Better yet, I know I can let him in the house when I'm gone and nothing will disappear lol.
I had a guy, for many years then he got a real job...
 
I've used Brickwall products for years and at my old apartment, it stopped electrical noise I was getting in my home theater setup. It was easy to do A/B testing to confirm at the time. Hardly an exhaustive investigation on my part but had no reason to go further since problem resolved. I like the form factor, I like the series protection, I like the heavy duty outlets that grip tightly and I like knowing I'm not relying on a piece of sacrificial metal to protect thousands of dollars worth of electronics. To each his own. FWIW, Brickwall does provide specs on their filters but as you can see, it's weighted on high frequency bands...and my cat never thanked me:

EMI/RFI Filter Response(bi-directional, wave tracking): With 50 ohm Rg load: 3db at 5kHz; 26dB at 100kHz; 38dB at 300kHz.
 
Taking the high road. I am not offended that everyone else is offended. If anyone takes offense to that then I may be offended. My cat may get offended well before I do, he is a sensitive type. If his bowl is empty he is greatly offended. I think I have said all I can say about that.
 
I've been designing filters for 45 years. They do not "filter" surges. You can misuse words as you like, ala Humpty Dumpty.
I read their copy, I don't see them saying my bootlegs will be so alive I'll be able to smell Jerry's toe jam, just general descriptions that seem to apply to their products generally, but I have no idea what language is used in your industry.

Humpty Dumpty had a language problem?
 
I'm not an expert in the field, but I'd think if you are going to spend this kind of money for surge protection, a whole house solution may be a better investment.
Exactly. Install a surge protector at the breaker box or main panel to protect the entire house and be done with it. They will provide better protection from minor and major spikes/surges. You can for redundancy sake add inexpensive surge protectors on crucial equipment if you care to.
 
Most cheaper whole home units are parallel devices (i.e. MOVs). They will also need to be monitored and replaced.
 
Peak clipper, limiter, surge protector. If I see a block diagram and it says "filter", it is a frequency discrimination circuit. I realize layman toss around these words promiscuously, mainly because of creative marketers I suspect. But we're on ASR.
Ruputable companies such as Schneider electric seem to distinguish their series SPD's from parallel SPD's based on the frequency content in the disturbances they they are intended to address. For example this bit of marketting from one of their so called white papers "Benefits of series-connected devices include mitigation of potentially damaging high-frequency noise, a tighter clamping voltage, and performance that is independent of installation practices.". ( I linked this paper several posts back). They go on to compare with parallel devices which are intended for lower frequency high energy surges. Maybe it is not just the laymen using the terminology. Since I'm not an expert, I can only imagine that the spectral content of a bolt of lightning consists mostly higher frequency energy, well above line frequency, and therefore a low pass filter of some topology would make a great tool for the job of snubbing the lightning induced surges for example. Since I cannot find any circuit diagrams of series SPD's I have no idea what is really contained within one. I was kind of hoping you'd have a bit more of a technical response than another appeal to your great authority.
 
Ruputable companies such as Schneider electric seem to distinguish their series SPD's from parallel SPD's based on the frequency content in the disturbances they they are intended to address. For example this bit of marketting from one of their so called white papers "Benefits of series-connected devices include mitigation of potentially damaging high-frequency noise, a tighter clamping voltage, and performance that is independent of installation practices.". ( I linked this paper several posts back). They go on to compare with parallel devices which are intended for lower frequency high energy surges. Maybe it is not just the laymen using the terminology. Since I'm not an expert, I can only imagine that the spectral content of a bolt of lightning consists mostly higher frequency energy, well above line frequency, and therefore a low pass filter of some topology would make a great tool for the job of snubbing the lightning induced surges for example. Since I cannot find any circuit diagrams of series SPD's I have no idea what is really contained within one. I was kind of hoping you'd have a bit more of a technical response than another appeal to your great authority.
Yes, when you design a surge suppressor the frequency content is a concern. Designs often have resistance and inductance to help limit the current pulses. They will filter, in addition to their main duty. But the point of the circuit is to limit voltage, not discriminate a particular frequency.
 
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