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SINAD vs. Price Correlation

cistercian

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#3
Interesting. As a Crown 1002 and 2502 owner I approve this thread. No complaints on the 2502...
except for the fact that my speakers use only speakon connectors. Decent cables are required for 400+
watt peaks. 12 Gauge seems enough.
 

valerianf

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#7
Well you have a PS Audio Stellar M700 Power Amplifier at less than 3000$ the pair (stereo) that has a SINAID of 82.8 dB.
The NAD C268 power amplifier at less than $1000 (stereo) has a SINAID of 84. dB.

Sorry but there is no correlation between SINAID and selling price.
SINAID depend how much money the manufacturer spend on R&D and if sound quality is a target.
If the manufacturer prefer to spend more on the front stickers (under license) or prefer to make more margin then SINAID oriented R&D if forgotten.

There are many very high end audio products with very poor results in the measurements.
Remember B&O hifi equipment, I read this week that they are bankrupted.
Their price position was very high in the end of the XX century with very poor real life measurements.
All the R&D money was spend on industrial product design followed by more money spent in luxurious advertising.

ASR tests are very useful as they provides real measurements without any advertising/marketing/brand name involvement.
 

JIW

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#9
Assuming the r2 is the R squared from an OLS regression, for a linear model, the coefficient of correlation between price and SINAD is calculated from the slope by multiplying by the standard deviation of the SINAD and dividing by standard deviation of price. The R2 measures how much variation is explained by the model price = a*SINAD + b.

If you want to determine how much more one should expect to need to pay to gain 1 dB of SINAD, you can just read of the slope. If instead you want to determine how much greater SINAD one can expect for a price increase of one, price and SINAD should change places in the model (the slope then being the reciprocal of the other arrangement).
 

watchnerd

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#17
I would add SINAD alone is not the best metric. Power output is relevant...so much so I don't care so much about my 2502 poor
SINAD at low level because it is a powerful amp and dollars/watt ratio is excellent.
SINAD is also a pretty bad metric of value once you get past the audibility threshold.

You're paying extra for betterness you can't hear.
 

cistercian

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#20
SINAD is also a pretty bad metric of value once you get past the audibility threshold.

You're paying extra for betterness you can't hear.
I can't hear the deficiencies in the 2502 at low level when it should be most apparent. It certainly is a non issue
at higher power where SINAD rises to 100db+ which is excellent in my book. Considering the speakers I use it
would be silly for me to be concerned anyway. I am actually surprised at how nice it sounds at low level though.
I consider it a bonus. I just wanted high SPL and decent fidelity to reproduce the live show sound.

I am glad it turned out to be more versatile. I doubt a serious audiophile would approve but fortunately I did not
build it for them. I laugh merrily as I crank it up to gonzo SPL!

Caveat. My hearing redline is 14.4kc. 15kc is as silent as the tomb to me. YMMV.
 
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