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Questions on cable lifter measuring

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Dec 1, 2018
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#1
While the essential role of cables in sound reproduction has been firmly stablished, I feel the functions of cable lifters are much less defined.

I would suggest there are four roles that cable lifters must perform. Defining these roles may help us in designing proper scientific testing strategies to assess cable lifter performance.

1) Isolation from the floor
2) Electromagnetic sink
3) Protection from vibrations
4) Prevention of rodent or insect damage

Did I miss something?

Secondly I think we must also establish if these parameters are of the same importance for powercords, speaker cables and interconnects. I would for instance suggest that rodent induced powercord interference might be a self limiting problem and thus of lesser importance.

I hope we can come to some type of evaluation strategy and convince Amir to perform measurements on selected lifters.
 

solderdude

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#5
1: The height of the cable must not be constant. It should sag a bit like power lines. When this doesn't happen all electrons pass through at the same speed. Electrons must make speed on the downwards slope of the cable and slow down when the cable goes upwards. Electrons that get caught on the bottom of the cable sag will be taken along by others.
When the cable is older or it sags too much you can get 'electron clogging' which will result in 'pinched' mids.

2: Don't route the cables through a sink... what were you sinking ?

3: Yes... the risers must be mounted on isolating feet. Both mechanical and electrical. We don't want the hot wire to contact ground so also electrical isolation is needed.

4: Not all insects... I like to attract mosquitos. This seems to work fine with ultrasonic sounds so you have to use non filtered NOS DACs that have ouzes of inaudible US signals in it. To trap them (will only happen near the riser) one must apply some sticky high-end lubricant. That same signal also seem to repel rodents (so advertisements tell me).
It seems to work... I have no rats but maybe because of the cats. Mice is another issue. Fortunately more and more of them are wireless but must be recharged now and then... damn mice !
 
OP
A
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Thread Starter #7
1: The height of the cable must not be constant. It should sag a bit like power lines. When this doesn't happen all electrons pass through at the same speed. Electrons must make speed on the downwards slope of the cable and slow down when the cable goes upwards. Electrons that get caught on the bottom of the cable sag will be taken along by others.
When the cable is older or it sags too much you can get 'electron clogging' which will result in 'pinched' mids.

2: Don't route the cables through a sink... what were you sinking ?

3: Yes... the risers must be mounted on isolating feet. Both mechanical and electrical. We don't want the hot wire to contact ground so also electrical isolation is needed.

4: Not all insects... I like to attract mosquitos. This seems to work fine with ultrasonic sounds so you have to use non filtered NOS DACs that have ouzes of inaudible US signals in it. To trap them (will only happen near the riser) one must apply some sticky high-end lubricant. That same signal also seem to repel rodents (so advertisements tell me).
It seems to work... I have no rats but maybe because of the cats. Mice is another issue. Fortunately more and more of them are wireless but must be recharged now and then... damn mice !
What is the optimal sag though? Or should we attach the cables to the ceiling for the most sag?

I actually forgot to mention amphibians. This morning I had to remove a toad from our living room. True story. It was on its way to my speakers. Since they are very conductive animals I shudder to think what it could have done to the soundstage.
 

pozz

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#8
Is April Fool's Day a United States thing, or do other countries have that tradition as well?
Most European countries, I'd guess. In Russia it's big:
1617287547034.png

It says (in rhymes): "Remember! On the first of April, (I) believe no one."

Bonus is if you know what the red circle traffic sign means.
 

Loathecliff

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#10
We worked on this issue many years ago.
Cables should be on an even descent from amp to speakers to help the signal flow effortlessly.
This caused immense problems when using a derived rear channel interface a la Hafler.
The ideal place for the rear speakers was far from ideal for the cables.
Add to this the conflict between the flow and the vital third order low pass filters & you can see the issues we faced.
Self levitating cables are the only solution, but we never could get them to do this with a variable rate to suit the required ascent/descent.
 

Maki

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#12
I'd recommend listening on the second floor. This further decouples your cables from ground infetterance. Ideally you would listen at high altitudes, that prevents the bits from getting lost in denser air.
 

TheBatsEar

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#13

Alexanderc

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#14
My new cable design uses an Archimedes screw to push the current through the wire to the speaker (don't ask how this works--it's proprietary). A small motor is attached to each cable to power the screw. This, of course, must use only the cleanest, most filtered power so you must also purchase my specially designed Archimedes power conditioner into which you plug the cables (to power the motor, we are not responsible for any damage to your equipment)--none of these wimpy battery powered cables! Cables cost $4,500 per meter, plus $10,000 for a pair of power conditioners (only sold in pairs). Shipping is extra and calculated at purchase since each meter of cable weighs 25 lbs. and the power conditioners are made of cast iron (for a solid, weighty sound!).
 

ta240

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#15
4) Prevention of rodent or insect damage
At least protection from rodents and insects that aren't able to climb things.....

Cables are so 2020. If you aren't using quantum entangled particles to connect your components you are really missing out.

 

Blumlein 88

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#20
I think for rodent protection you need to install Faraday cages around the cables.
 
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