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JBL SRX835P Reviewed (Powered Monitor)

sarumbear

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So dynamic capability has been identified as important but is missing from the current test regime. Extra work and possibly software/hardware but could something like: https://m-noise.org/ be added to the test suite?
This is a great idea. I hope @amirm agrees.
 

drplinker

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So dynamic capability has been identified as important but is missing from the current test regime. Extra work and possibly software/hardware but could something like: https://m-noise.org/ be added to the test suite?
Yes, would be nice include this test in measurement regime.

After quick glance if I got it right, M-noise replicates tonality of music and appears to measure mainly HF capabilities - how much and how well it handles output power surge and recovery.

I may be wrong, but my understanding of speaker's dynamic capability is how well it can reproduce an quieter instrument (example) played at the same time as another loud instrument. Or say someone whispering while loud drums are playing. And without increasing the output to high enough level, the whisper would cannot be heard. And @amirm is pointing out in listening test of this speaker is that increasing volume on smaller speakers to high enough level to hear such whispering will introduce distortion in drums, however this speaker can deliver both whispering and drums without adding distortion.

If my understanding is right, then it unclear how m-noise is measuring dynamic capability. Are there better tests?
 

jones

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It just struck me that we are dealing with aktive speakers.
Maybe there are different firmware versions at play?

For example, DBtechnologies recently has redone the tuning of the whole Vio Series.

I can't find any changelogs for JBL firmware.
Maybe sombody knows something here?
 

bobster

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seeing some of the QSC speakers measured would be nice - seems like the dj community has really coalesced around QSC gear.

Not just DJs. Keyboardists use them too - I'm one of them, with a pair of K10 (original version). A colleague who plays keys with a major touring rock act was (and maybe still is) and endorser of the K-series.

I'd be curious to see how they measure.
 

kyle_neuron

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Yes, would be nice include this test in measurement regime.

After quick glance if I got it right, M-noise replicates tonality of music and appears to measure mainly HF capabilities - how much and how well it handles output power surge and recovery.

I may be wrong, but my understanding of speaker's dynamic capability is how well it can reproduce an quieter instrument (example) played at the same time as another loud instrument. Or say someone whispering while loud drums are playing. And without increasing the output to high enough level, the whisper would cannot be heard. And @amirm is pointing out in listening test of this speaker is that increasing volume on smaller speakers to high enough level to hear such whispering will introduce distortion in drums, however this speaker can deliver both whispering and drums without adding distortion.

If my understanding is right, then it unclear how m-noise is measuring dynamic capability. Are there better tests?

M-Noise is a pink noise test signal with >16 dB crest factor in the high frequency area, which more closely represents a broad sample of music that was analysed as part of the process.

By using their suggested testing method, you find the peak output SPL where the speaker becomes noticeably non-linear. That's a useful metric because it gives you the maximum level you're likely to want to listen to the thing.

Comparing this against a typical listening level or stated 2.83 V sensitivity metric gives your dynamic range value.

There's work being done to make this an AES standard, so it clearly has some benefit. In my experience the results of the test can be very telling, but you do need a true 96 KHz capable audio interface and mic that doesn't distort early (ruling out the typical cheaper MEMS mics) to conduct the test properly for many pro audio speakers. I've measured >137 dB linear peak SPL on some of the boxes we use, for example.
 

Kouioui

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This thread has been great reading for understanding why dynamics play such an important role in a speaker. I recently performed with a 4pc band at an upscale 70th birthday party at an opulent home, trying to recreate live those hits from the decade through a SRX series setup that included the reviewed unit with subs. Our stage was next to an outdoor pool, so I was able to listen to them without a room piling on its issues.

My impression was fairly positive at making the pre-show 70s music sound as though a real band was performing. I clearly don't have the same engineering and design chops as those posting here, but this 65 year old had a great time listening to these JBLs in a real world situation.

More audiophiles should consider pro portable live sound gear at whatever price they could afford in a home speaker, if there are no objections to the aesthetics of them in a home. For instance, I use both JBL LSR305/310S nearfields and a full JBL IRX portable PA rig in my project studio. For the $1500 I spent for the complete IRX 2.2 system (with poles), I doubt the usual speakers sold for home use at the same price could make people want to DANCE as a speaker system with adequate dynamics can.

PEQ @ 83dB makes the LSR/IRX measurement graphs come quite close after being calibrated with a UMIK-1, REW, and APOeq. My clients would rather hear their final mix on the IRXs 99% of the time, as most of them have hearing loss from the constant exposure to elevated volumes. There's something to be said for trying to reproduce what a live band would sound like in a private residence.
 

kyle_neuron

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For anyone who would be happy with a powered, plastic PA speaker in their house but was a little disappointed with the results from this JBL, may I suggest having a look at the new RCF ART 945?

Here's some independent data from the Production Partner magazine in Germany. Forgive the tiny screenshots, I only get the digital edition due to needing to translate most of it. My high school German is very, very rusty :)

Most of the magazine’s data is measured by a very skilled engineer, Anselm Goertz, using a robot arm for 360-degree balloon generation in a hemi-anechoic chamber.
 

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tktran303

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Apart from the top octave that RCF speaker would EQ very well.

For professional musicians (that is; those whose job relies on the sweat and tears of live performance) who know- whatever venue one is performing in, is a constant variable in live audio; so processing is needed; even for the perfectly neutral speaker…

But it is a narrow dispersion speaker and looks awfully utilitarian in a typical living room. Nice outdoor speaker for your weekend parties…
 
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kyle_neuron

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But it is a narrow dispersion speaker and looks awfully utilitarian in a typical living room. Nice outdoor speaker for your weekend parties…
I don’t class a nominal dispersion of 80-90 degrees from 500 Hz up as narrow, myself? The orange to yellow transition is the -6 dB division on those isobar plots.
 

More Dynamics Please

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It's really great to be seeing some measurements of pro gear, even more so after reading Amir's listening test here. Like mentioned in the thread, seeing some of the QSC speakers measured would be nice - seems like the dj community has really coalesced around QSC gear.

Another PA speaker that would be really interesting to measure is RCF's new ART 9 series which (marketing wise) promises better sound with modern things like waveguides and DSP.

https://audioxpress.com/news/rcf-ce...-active-speaker-series-with-new-art-9-designs

RCF's new ART 9 series does sound interesting. Haven't seen any measurements yet but did find a German review that's reasonably positive:

 
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