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JBL SRX835P Reviewed (Powered Monitor)

Helicopter

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Man, those are unusually designed speakers. When did they come out? Trying to guess as to whether they benefitted from Harman research or not (that collaboration started with JBL M2).

Edit: was looking at a different speaker.

If someone helps offset the cost, I can look at buying one to test.
I can't find release date, but there are posts about them on AVSforum from 2010, so before that... I suppose itnis better to test stuff that is new to market.

Looking forward to the Eon revire, and I enjoyed the story about your wife 'noticing' this speaker from inside the house. :)
 

Francis Vaughan

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I’m ready to get abuse for this, but these ‘pro’ speakers really aren’t that pro. They are more the crap mobile DJ’s use,
If the DJ is getting paid these are “pro” by definition.
The idea that pro means high quality is just marketing. Pro means it is used to make a living with. As opposed to amateur. Pro gear is designed to a price that is appropriate for use. A gigging DJ needs a given capability and realistic price point. A true pro piece of gear gives that to him. If the gear is too expensive it isn’t pro. If it’s price is so high that a professional can’t make a living with it, by definition it isn’t professional gear.
If a different professional requires a different specification of gear, and has the money flows to justify that gear, there is another happy professional product.
If I owned a major sound company doing gigs for major stadium sized shows, I would have a very different set of requirements. If I had a recording studio different again. I am going to be carefully choosing gear that meets my needs and falls with my ability to make a living after I pay for my gear. It is all pro gear.
 

sarumbear

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I’m ready to get abuse for this, but these ‘pro’ speakers really aren’t that pro. They are more the crap mobile DJ’s use, or used for cheap ‘speaker on sticks’ gigs when sound quality really doesn’t matter. Even JBL Vertec wasn’t know for its sound quality, people accepted it on riders, sure, but it was very few peoples first choice on the true pro side. A12 / A8 is a far different (better beast).
Not abuse (never abuse!) but maybe an English refresher :)

The dictionary says professional is someone who is engaged in a specified activity as one's main paid occupation rather than as a pastime. Your "crap mobile DJ" can well be a professional DJ. JBL have designed those speakers for PA/DJ work as they use the industry standard pole mount. In other words they are professional speakers to be used by a professional, not listened at a lab but at a large space, mounted on a pole, above head level. Funny enough when @amirm replicated that space and started playing music at the levels intended he had created a club and very much enjoyed the sound quality. As a pretend DJ he even made his wife dance.

In short, the lab testing was not reflecting the real life for that speaker, then why should it? As a near field testing system, NFS is not suitable for large field sound analysis. @amirm says he tests pro gear because ASR community is interested in their use at home. It is his site, his decision. Though, I wish he wouldn't spend his efforts on them. His words sums up the dilemma of testing big pro speakers.

Measurements show a clearly imperfect speaker here.

You have not lived until you experience a speaker with such high dynamics.

The meaning of the word professional had been bastardised by the marketing people and totally misused within the Hi-Fi community. Professional doesn't mean better. In fact it shouldn't mean better. There is no quality definition in the word other than reliable and long lasting. A professional who is earning money using a professional device searches for a device that offers him the best value for money (as cheap as possible) while offering sufficient quality of work (it allows my customers satisfied). Sufficient is the opposite of state of the art that we strive on ASR. It is the total opposite of what @amirm's measurement exist.

That is why I cannot understand why professional equipment are involved in testing and discussions that much. Obviously there are some exceptions, there are always cross-over devices, but still...
 
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levimax

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Sufficient is the opposite of state of the art that we strive on ASR. It is the total opposite of what @amirm's measurement exist.

That is why I cannot understand why professional equipment are involved in testing and discussions that much. Obviously there are some exceptions, there are always cross-over devices, but still...

Part of the value ASR offers is helping everyone learn and have perspective what is really important in sound reproduction as well as what is SOTA engineering. I think knowing what is "sufficient" is actually the most valuable thing you can learn. A good example is I needed an ADC and I had never considered "pro" models but after looking at ASR test results I realized that a "pro" ADC, while not SOTA, was certainly sufficient to digitize my TT output so I saved a lot of money at got something that works perfectly for my needs.

While using "PA" speakers in a home environment is not without potential pitfalls I think it is an interesting thing to look into especially with EQ that is now much more assessable to the home user. A good question is "what are sufficient SPL levels for a home system".... I think many home systems have "insufficient" peak SPL capability. Music dynamics are fun to listen to and adding 25 dB of peak SPL capability in most cases is more important than adding 25 dB of SINAD but it is VERY hard and expensive to do so.... PA speakers may offer a solution to some if they have the information to tame them which is what Amir is providing.
 

More Dynamics Please

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Interesting that in that review, the measurements are pretty close to this JBL:

View attachment 144221

Same boosted bass up to midrange and chewed up treble. Maybe they all know something? That bass is lost in open space so they try to goose it up?

I'd expect most live performance speakers to perform similarly as they are all designed for similar purpose. A key question for home audio use is what could be accomplished with EQ? Finding those with minimal self-noise would likely be a priority for home audio use and in that area QSC seems to generally score better than JBL and other brands.

For the type of speaker being considered here I think using the industry standard term of live performance speaker is more descriptive since the general term PA speaker is associated with public address systems optimized more for speech than music. Live performance speakers are primarily used by musicians and also DJs.
 

tomtoo

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Pro or not, who cares?
There is just one question, does the device fits my needs?
 

quantum_wave

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It's really great to be seeing some measurements of pro gear, even more so after reading Amir's listening test here. Like mentioned in the thread, seeing some of the QSC speakers measured would be nice - seems like the dj community has really coalesced around QSC gear.

Another PA speaker that would be really interesting to measure is RCF's new ART 9 series which (marketing wise) promises better sound with modern things like waveguides and DSP.

https://audioxpress.com/news/rcf-ce...-active-speaker-series-with-new-art-9-designs
 

beagleman

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Yeah so, I'm not sure why I would need to hear it to know there are aspects that don't sound good. Unless of course you presume things like resonances, mid-range anemia, and tweeter performance being a bit meh - can qualify as something that most would summarize as "good things".

I'm not particularly fond of a company like JBL somewhat shooting in the dark and putting out something they assume would simply suffice. And as I said before, ESPECIALLY not for a price like that.

Also as I said, I'm not concerned with it's "intended use". Unless it's a use-case that doesn't involve ears, or a use-case that isn't some weapon. All speakers should sound good regardless of price. As price climbs (whether I've ever listened to it or not) I'd expect it to sound good (which is what I originally said).


But "Intended use" dictates what a speaker is used for. These are sound reinforcement or P.A, speakers, and have much different criteria than a small monitor designed for a bed room or desk or small living room Hi Fi sound.

Sound reinforcement speakers are simply not comparable to small Hi Fi speakers or home speakers in general.

It is not that they can NOT sound good, but simply the ways of getting narrow dispersion, and high output and ability to handle very high power and project sound out over a sizeable area, require drivers that are not equal to low output home speakers.
 

AlexanderM

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But "Intended use" dictates what a speaker is used for. These are sound reinforcement or P.A, speakers, and have much different criteria than a small monitor designed for a bed room or desk or small living room Hi Fi sound.

Sound reinforcement speakers are simply not comparable to small Hi Fi speakers or home speakers in general.

It is not that they can NOT sound good, but simply the ways of getting narrow dispersion, and high output and ability to handle very high power and project sound out over a sizeable area, require drivers that are not equal to low output home speakers.
JBL has similar speakers designated for cinema. I am wondering if they would be any better for Hi Fi applications, I have no idea. I think of the PA speaker as public address, not Hi Fi, would cinema be any different? You'll find some here, along with the beam arrays.

https://jblpro.com/en/product_families/immersive-rooms
 

More Dynamics Please

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Many modern homes are being constructed with open plans and vaulted ceilings. Smaller live performance speakers are designed to work in smaller venues more comparable to larger home environments.
 

drplinker

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It's really great to be seeing some measurements of pro gear, even more so after reading Amir's listening test here. Like mentioned in the thread, seeing some of the QSC speakers measured would be nice - seems like the dj community has really coalesced around QSC gear.

Another PA speaker that would be really interesting to measure is RCF's new ART 9 series which (marketing wise) promises better sound with modern things like waveguides and DSP.

https://audioxpress.com/news/rcf-ce...-active-speaker-series-with-new-art-9-designs

I remember comparing JBL SRX835P to QSC KW153 before choosing on JBL. Both sounded very very close during my Guitar Center testing (subjective listening). I don't remember what exact parameters that biased my choice (IIRC its network + DSP capabilities). On pro/dj forums, people are equally split b/n these, plenty of subjective comments, however no measurements! QSC fanboys say JBL = Junk But Loud

BTW, regarding weight of SRX835P (or QSC KW253) 85lbs - is it too much? Most of the hi-fi floor standing speakers are over 100lbs.
 
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sarumbear

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I needed an ADC and I had never considered "pro" models but after looking at ASR test results I realized that a "pro" ADC, while not SOTA, was certainly sufficient to digitize my TT output so I saved a lot of money at got something that works perfectly for my needs.
May I ask for the make & model of the ADC and the date you made that decision?
 

sarumbear

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Focusrite Scarlett 2i2
That is a prosumer device. It is aimed for all sectors of music reproduction and musicians. You find them at high street music shops including Apple Stores.

They specifically split their pro devices to a different brand/company called Focusrite Pro in order to clarify their intended user base.
 

richard12511

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Not abuse (never abuse!) but maybe an English refresher :)

The dictionary says professional is someone who is engaged in a specified activity as one's main paid occupation rather than as a pastime. Your "crap mobile DJ" can well be a professional DJ. JBL have designed those speakers for PA/DJ work as they use the industry standard pole mount. In other words they are professional speakers to be used by a professional, not listened at a lab but at a large space, mounted on a pole, above head level. Funny enough when @amirm replicated that space and started playing music at the levels intended he had created a club and very much enjoyed the sound quality. As a pretend DJ he even made his wife dance.

In short, the lab testing was not reflecting the real life for that speaker, then why should it? As a near field testing system, NFS is not suitable for large field sound analysis. @amirm says he tests pro gear because ASR community is interested in their use at home. It is his site, his decision. Though, I wish he wouldn't spend his efforts on them. His words sums up the dilemma of testing big pro speakers.





The meaning of the word professional had been bastardised by the marketing people and totally misused within the Hi-Fi community. Professional doesn't mean better. In fact it shouldn't mean better. There is no quality definition in the word other than reliable and long lasting. A professional who is earning money using a professional device searches for a device that offers him the best value for money (as cheap as possible) while offering sufficient quality of work (it allows my customers satisfied). Sufficient is the opposite of state of the art that we strive on ASR. It is the total opposite of what @amirm's measurement exist.

That is why I cannot understand why professional equipment are involved in testing and discussions that much. Obviously there are some exceptions, there are always cross-over devices, but still...

Agree with everything here except the last two sentences :D.
 

quantum_wave

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Much of this talk about pro-gear seems to assume that pro people don't care about sounds quality and that isn't necessarily the case at all. Many professional DJs deeply care about sound quality. QSC sells well with DJs because its generally considered to "sound better" of the gear that meets their pro needs. Of course, they don't yet have measurements to know if that's really the case or just the result of marketing bias.
 

jones

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First of all: Thanks to @amirm for testing such systems.
I would LOVE more such measurements.

In Pro-Audio dispersion is arguably even more important than at home due to listeners being spread all over the place.
Many manufacturers advertise with precise dispersion but many speakers sadly don't shine here.

Against some other posters here I think PA speakers should totally be flat with good dispersion.
I do a lot of sound reinforcement and with often limited time for setup you just want a neutral speaker.
You then can quickly compensate for the usecase or the enviroment, but only if the speaker isn't up for some funny business.
Air attenuation is normally a non issue with such small systems. Listeners are typically close to the Speaker (<20m or even <10m at the farest point of interrest).

I am a little bit disappointed of this speaker.
Many flaws here are designed by choice.
They even used FIR filters, wich would make it more than easy to correct the frequency response.

Some other things may not be the speakers fault.
The chewed up response of the tweeter may very well be (in part) caused by the grill. Of course the large compression driver also does it's part.
I am currently designing simmilar speakers and while I am not finished, I still quickly compared the response with and without grill some time ago.
I use a custom made hex-grill very similar to the one JBL uses.
Here is how that looks. Without smoothing it is even worse. Please note that this is indoor and heavily gated.

mit_ohne Gitter.png


You can even see the reflection in the impuls response (green with, yellow without grill). I am not shure about this, but I use FIR-filters for flat phase response, which might make this more visible than usual. The JBL speaker also has linearised phase. Maybe this shows in your measurements too @amirm :)
impuls_gitter.png


I also have problems with abnormal bass response due to the large enclosure.
It takes some real effort to to something here and I am still not there by far.
This is also visible in other large speakers measured here. For example the large JBL Monitor with the 12" woofer I think.

For reference, this is the speaker measured. Just imagine a grill similar to the JBL :)
20210509_175834_HDR (2).jpg

Lastly:
In short, the lab testing was not reflecting the real life for that speaker, then why should it? As a near field testing system, NFS is not suitable for large field sound analysis. @amirm says he tests pro gear because ASR community is interested in their use at home. It is his site, his decision. Though, I wish he wouldn't spend his efforts on them. His words sums up the dilemma of testing big pro speakers.
Please don't say that. Read up on how the NFS actually works.
The NFS is more than suitable, as it generates real far field responses, wich are otherwise really hard to obtain for large speakers.
On the Klippel website you can even see Photos of the NFS with some D&B V Linearray cabinets on it, wich should have an immensly complex soundfield :)

While I am interrested in PA speakers for PA use, there are reasons to look at them from a Hifi standpoint.
There is a lot to learn und I would (and probably will :)) totally listen with my big speakers at home if I had the space.

Edit: One question that is bugging me: Why is this thing so damn large?
As a designer I would not want that much space for a modern 15" even if I had no restrictions there.
Even 15" PA Subs are often smaller, including my own designes.
Bass extension is quit good for a fullrange PA speaker, but 40Hz are totally possible with a smaller footprint while still getting enough output.
 
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