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Hypex UcD180HG HxR amplifier module analysis and review

opel

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I hope you have the basic understanding of electronic circuits. With output LC filter (2nd order LPF) tuned at about 50kHz/-3dB it is physically impossible to get flat FR up to 20kHz without having unstable response and low stability margin. You would need to go to much higher switching frequency and this would bring new issues. And this topology keeps FR invariant of load, so getting 20kHz flat means underdamped filter and wild overshoots in step response. Take or leave, I ask for professional discussion.
Take it easy. I understand what you are writing

Thanks for the explanation
Some claim that you get better sound by removing the input capacitor. what is your opinion here?
I know that everything you have in the series of signal does something with the sound in one way or another

If you are interested then I have compare Naim NAP 250 clone (ljm) with hypex usd180st. hypex is much better in higher bright frequencies, frequencies where naim struggles a lot.

NAIM NAP250 amp.

(2 x 4 ohm 50hz)
Volt. 22.6V
Amp. 5.66A
= 129.916w
 
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EJ3

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A correction. NAD 2200 Power output: 100 watts per channel into 8Ω (stereo), 400 watts into 8Ω (mono)
You almost NEVER get double watts in 4 ohms.
As per Amirm's measurements:

NAD 2200 Vintage Amplifier Review

index.php




Wow, we have one kilowatt of power coming out of this amp in short duration!
Lab Input Measurements
I was surprised that the frequency response was not flat but was relieved to see later in the thread that this is due to insertion of low and high pass filters. So here is the frequency response with Lab input that doesn't have such a filter:

index.php




Response now (in green) as it should be, ruler flat to below 10 Hz, and well extending past the 40 kHz limit of this measurement.
Zoomed:

index.php




And signal to noise ratio:


index.php




Conclusions
Nice to see innovation like this from equipment that is over 30 years old! Shame on manufacturers that produce amplifiers for much less power, more distortion and higher prices these days. No, you don't get a fancy case here and sheet metal is strictly budget category. But you are not going to sit on the amp. The guts are where it matters and NAD 2200 delivers.
 

opel

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As per Amirm's measurements:

NAD 2200 Vintage Amplifier Review

index.php




Wow, we have one kilowatt of power coming out of this amp in short duration!
Lab Input Measurements
I was surprised that the frequency response was not flat but was relieved to see later in the thread that this is due to insertion of low and high pass filters. So here is the frequency response with Lab input that doesn't have such a filter:

index.php




Response now (in green) as it should be, ruler flat to below 10 Hz, and well extending past the 40 kHz limit of this measurement.
Zoomed:

index.php




And signal to noise ratio:


index.php




Conclusions
Nice to see innovation like this from equipment that is over 30 years old! Shame on manufacturers that produce amplifiers for much less power, more distortion and higher prices these days. No, you don't get a fancy case here and sheet metal is strictly budget category. But you are not going to sit on the amp. The guts are where it matters and NAD 2200 delivers.
NAD 2200 is a good amplifier. It's RMS. watts which is correct. I measure with ocilocope all the way to signal clips and then I turn down a little so it no longer clips.

max. does not counts! It is watts you can run all the time (rms) and not max
 

EJ3

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OK. I'll play your game:
It is power measurements where the magic of this amplifier comes to life so let's look at that with 4 ohm load first:

index.php




We can see a kink in distortion when we hit 200 watts as the unit sails past that to produce whopping 337 watts per channel, both driven!
 

EJ3

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NAD 2200 is a good amplifier. It's RMS. watts which is correct. I measure with ocilocope all the way to signal clips and then I turn down a little so it no longer clips.

max. does not counts! It is watts you can run all the time (rms) and not max
and here is a video of an un-refurbished NAD 2200 loaded onto a SMD AMPLIFIER DYNO AD-1 (particularly look at the page of certified results at 10:22 of the video for 8 Ohms, 4 Ohms, 4 Ohm bridged mono & the 4 Ohm bridged mono burst test resulting in 1799 watts):
 

TimW

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This thread inspired me to buy a couple UcD180HG HxR modules for my desk setup subwoofers. Right now I have them powered from by a 500VA 24V transformer, which should yield 34V unloaded. They sound great and haven't shut down or seemingly run out of steam at high (nearfield) volumes. Is there any way to calculate or estimate the maximum output power from these modules at this lower supply voltage?
 

restorer-john

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He is trying to say the 2200 cannot deliver its dynamic power output continuously. Fair enough. After 500mS or so, the high voltage rails collapse and they are switched out. It is designed that way.

The 2200 can deliver around 140-150 watts continuous per channel into 8R and a little over 200 watts continuous into 4R per channel. It is a champion in the dynamic stakes due to the +/-95V rails and commutating design.
 
OP
pma

pma

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This thread inspired me to buy a couple UcD180HG HxR modules for my desk setup subwoofers. Right now I have them powered from by a 500VA 24V transformer, which should yield 34V unloaded. They sound great and haven't shut down or seemingly run out of steam at high (nearfield) volumes. Is there any way to calculate or estimate the maximum output power from these modules at this lower supply voltage?

Glad to hear it works well for you. Yes there is a simple way to predict output power depending on power supply voltage, quite reliably. You need to know PSU DC voltage when it is loaded (red trace, +Vs = 39V). Then the peak amplifier output voltage would be about 3V below the PSU DC output. Here it is about Vp = 36V. RMS output is Vrms = Vp/1.414. Power is Vrms^2/Rload. However, as always, you need to do your homework yourself ;).
This estimation is valid for SE output amplifier with dual (+Vs/-Vs) power supply. It cannot be used for BTL configuration.


100VA_supply.png
 

EJ3

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Glad to hear it works well for you. Yes there is a simple way to predict output power depending on power supply voltage, quite reliably. You need to know PSU DC voltage when it is loaded (red trace, +Vs = 39V). Then the peak amplifier output voltage would be about 3V below the PSU DC output. Here it is about Vp = 36V. RMS output is Vrms = Vp/1.414. Power is Vrms^2/Rload. However, as always, you need to do your homework yourself ;).
This estimation is valid for SE output amplifier with dual (+Vs/-Vs) power supply. It cannot be used for BTL configuration.


View attachment 176359
Thank you, I was wondering the same thing.
 
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