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Finally decided to do something about my room

Joined
May 15, 2019
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#1
Hi all,

As usual, I did this project ass-backwards, as I didn't have the means to do any measurements before starting. But, I had a few days off work and I wanted to use it building DIY room treatments-- just some basics to tighten up the bass and catch the reflections bouncing of a window behind my listening spot on the sofa.

On the rear wall I covered the window with a large panel of 4-inch Rockwool 60, and two smaller 2-inch Rockwool 60 panels on either side. A Carver Audio banner serves as the fabric cover on the window panel. On the front wall, I added floor-to-ceiling corner traps with 6-inch Rockwool 60. One of the corner traps had to wrap around a bar shelf but I made it work. I also made a movable pedestal panel with 2-inch Rockwool 60.

I didn't do a lot of research before starting this project, so anticipate some change may be needed. I can already hear some improvements but I will wait until I have it dialed in to post my impressions. Hopefully, within the next couple of weeks, I will get REW connected, learn how to use it, and finally get my system dialed in.



wall frames.jpeg
frame shop.jpeg
sofa 2.jpeg
trap frame.jpeg
right trap .jpeg
left trap .jpeg
 

andreasmaaan

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#2
The panels look very nice, good work.

If you mount the 2” panels with an air gap between them and the wall, their effectiveness at lower frequencies will improve significantly. All else equal, a 2” panel with a 2” air gap will work nearly as effectively as a 4” panel.

You also might consider not placing panels at the first side wall reflection points. Your panel speakers will already have quite narrow lateral lateral dispersion and, in any case, lateral reflections are often preferable in terms of creating a sense of spaciousness.

How far is your sofa from the back wall? Bringing it a little further into the room mightn’t be a bad idea.

Finally, it’s hard to judge the angles in the pics, but is each of the thicker rear absorbers oriented symmetrically with respect to each speaker? Not sure if this can be improved / is already the case, but lateral symmetry is definitely something to aim for.

Sorry if I’m covering topics you’re already familiar with btw. Just my 2c :)

Andreas
 
Joined
May 15, 2019
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#3
The panels look very nice, good work.

If you mount the 2” panels with an air gap between them and the wall, their effectiveness at lower frequencies will improve significantly. All else equal, a 2” panel with a 2” air gap will work nearly as effectively as a 4” panel.

You also might consider not placing panels at the first side wall reflection points. Your panel speakers will already have quite narrow lateral lateral dispersion and, in any case, lateral reflections are often preferable in terms of creating a sense of spaciousness.

How far is your sofa from the back wall? Bringing it a little further into the room mightn’t be a bad idea.

Finally, it’s hard to judge the angles in the pics, but is each of the thicker rear absorbers oriented symmetrically with respect to each speaker? Not sure if this can be improved / is already the case, but lateral symmetry is definitely something to aim for.

Sorry if I’m covering topics you’re already familiar with btw. Just my 2c :)

Andreas
Thanks for your reply. I'm already regretting not making the panel frames deeper to create an air gap behind the Rockwool-- I may end up remaking them deeper. Moving the sofa a bit farther from the back wall is do-able.

The orientations of the main speakers relative to the corner traps are not as symmetrical as I would like but moving them creates other problems (blocking the the door of the laundry room being one).

My homebuilt ESL speakers are flat panels but they aren't anywhere near as directional as appearances suggest-- because they use special multi-segmented, phased-array stators that electrically curve their projected wave front (see my website for details: http://jazzman-esl-page.blogspot.com).

Yes; this is a learning process for me so, thanks again for your input!
 
Joined
Feb 16, 2019
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#5
Is that Paneling in the background,wasn't that popular in the 70's,oh i have fond memories.
 
Joined
May 15, 2019
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#6
Is that Paneling in the background,wasn't that popular in the 70's,oh i have fond memories.
Yes. When I bought the house, the living room had this horrible dark wood wall paneling, which made it so dark you couldn't see anything. Rather than ripping it out and putting up drywall, I just painted over it with corn-silk-yellow flat latex and it looks a whole lot better. My next project is to replace that awful carpet.
 

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