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Dynaudio Core 47 vs HEDD Type 20 MK2

Berwhale

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Is this due to magnetic properties of the materials involved?

IIRC, the measured changes were attributed to mechincal changes in material used to suspend the diaphram.
 

peanuts

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iv had several dynaudio speakers and yes they do improve after maybe 20-30hrs (woofer spider). the notion is this needing to be only a few seconds or similar is hillarious. you dont have a clue what you are talking about, sorry.
 

Berwhale

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Another couple of questions to ask yourself about 'burn-in' are:

1. If mechnical/electrical/magnetic changes in the drivers affect the sound quality, why do these changes always make the sound better and not worse?

2. If significant mechnical/electrical/magnetic changes are occuring in the drivers, what stops these processes from continuing after the 'burn-in' has occured?
 

Berwhale

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iv had several dynaudio speakers and yes they do improve after maybe 20-30hrs (woofer spider). the notion is this needing to be only a few seconds or similar is hillarious. you dont have a clue what you are talking about, sorry.

You have measurements and evidence to back up those statements? Please enlighten me.

If it only takes 20-30 hours to burn the speakers in, why don't Dynaudio do this for you in the factory?
 
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Scholl

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Another couple of questions to ask yourself about 'burn-in' are:

1. If mechnical/electrical/magnetic changes in the drivers affect the sound quality, why do these changes always make the sound better and not worse?

While I don't discard possible slight mechanical break-in over time, in my opinion it is mostly because our brain is progressively getting used to the sound of the new speakers and forgetting the old ones. This is also true for listening environment (room) change. The brain adapts to the new sound and consider it as the norm. The new sound becomes "better" to us over time, even though it does not necessarily change.

That kind of psychoacoustic phenomenon is something about which recording engineers are really cautious (I am one). When working sessions are too long and the ears are getting tired, we start making weird or bad choices. The brain adapts to more and more extreme sounds. And when we listen back a day later with fresh, more objective ears, we wonder what we were even thinking.
 

xaviescacs

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1. If mechnical/electrical/magnetic changes in the drivers affect the sound quality, why do these changes always make the sound better and not worse?

2. If significant mechnical/electrical/magnetic changes are occuring in the drivers, what stops these processes from continuing after the 'burn-in' has occured?

That kind of psychoacoustic phenomenon is something about which recording engineers are really cautious (I am one). When working sessions are too long and the ears are getting tired, we start making weird or bad choices. The brain adapts to more and more extreme sounds. And when we listen back a day later with fresh, more objective ears, we wonder what we were even thinking.

All this makes a lot of sense, I'm not a materials engineer so a will refrain from trying to guess why this could happen. The question here is that the manufacturer states some quite precise instructions that in my opinion are worth investigating, because they are elevating such a myth into an indication in a professional speaker manual. If amir can't find anything, it would be quite hard to believe (the absence of any effect can't be proved) that this effect exists and I, personally, would be quite disappointed with the manufacturer.
 

Koeitje

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Is this due to magnetic properties of the materials involved?

No, its purely mechanical. Everything moves and that has a tiny tiny tiny effect on new drivers. Factory testing usually is enough. Don't forget how fast these things vibrate, doesn't take long to give them a good stretch.
 

Berwhale

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Adam provides a video on why they need burn in. Interesting.


I like the video, but I question the validity of the shoe analogy...

  1. The materials involved are completely different
  2. A shoe breaks in to comform to your foot. Your foot is something that is added to the shoe after the shoes manufacture. Nothing similar gets added to a speaker to cause it to break in.
  3. Given an accurate anatomical model of your feet, I suspect it would be fairly easy to design a machine that could break in a new pair of shoes in minutes, rather than the painfull days or weeks it would take when wearing them. e.g. US2470867A - Machine for breaking in shoes - Google Patents
I had read about microcracks in the suspension material and I believe that this is fairly well accepted, however, my understanding is that this is something that happens within seconds of the driver being energized.
 
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