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Fosi Audio BT20A Pro Amplifier Review

Rate this stereo amplifier

  • 1. Poor (headless panther)

    Votes: 3 1.0%
  • 2. Not terrible (postman panther)

    Votes: 34 11.1%
  • 3. Fine (happy panther)

    Votes: 180 58.6%
  • 4. Great (golfing panther)

    Votes: 90 29.3%

  • Total voters
    307
First of all, thanks amirm for the review!

Finally, I've got my blue BT20A Pro with the orange knob 45 days after purchase.
Overall, I like it very much!

Unfortunately, my device gets pretty hot. Even if I place the BT20 elevated, with free airflow around, the metal body gets very warm.
I've measured 43 °C/109,4 °F on the top of the case!
If I place it in my normal living room shelf it gets unbearable hot. I cannot stack it there, where my WiiM Pro and SMSL D-6 are staying at cool temperatures.

The crazy thing about this is that the device gets this hot only by turning it on. When playing music, it gets barely hotter than that. After shutting the device off, the case gets back to normal levels.
I have the version with the 48V power supply. The power supply itself stays cool.

Does anybody else get these temperatures?
@Fosi Audio is my device malfunctioning?

For reference: none of my other Class D Amps/DACs gets noticeably above room temperature.
32V PSU here, 26°C room temperature. The Fosi BT20A Pro played all day at good volume and it is still playing, case temperature 35°C.
 
Mine seemed to get a lot hotter when connected with Bluetooth. When just using RCA it seems fine.
 
Thanks for all the replies!

I've investigated a little further on this.
When the power-switch is off, the amp consumes about 0.5 Watts. When power is on, without playing any music, it consumes about 7.5 Watts in idle mode.
Yesterday, I've switched the amp on without RCA/Speakers connected/playing for testing purposes and the temperature got up to 47°C/116,6°F within 1-2 hours! It stayed at this temperature.
After 3 hours of no changing temperature, I connected my RCA/Speakers and played at about modest 65 dbA (with low sensitivity speakers) and it didn't go up in temperature at all.

What surprises me that much is that the amp gets this hot without playing any music. 47°C doesn't sound very much, but its quite uncomfortable touching it and it feels like a little heater in my room, even though I don't really "use" it.

@SaltyCDogg: Thanks for your hint. I will investigate on this. Haven't connected bluetooth yet.
@nickaigi: Thanks for your experience with the 48V power supply. Would be interesting what the real temperatures are.
@Luminair: Thanks for your explanations. I'm just surprised that the device is that hot, without playing any music at all. I like the sleek look of the BT20A, but now I'm thinking about drilling holes, applying outside heat sinks or even installing a fan - this seems kind of ridiculus to me, let alone losing on guarantee.

Would be great if anybody else with the 48V power supply could reply in terms of idle case temperatures.
 
Thanks @MatB for digging deeper.

After reading @Luminair reply, I went and read the data sheet (Section 7.4: Thermal Information and 9.4.1.5 Overtemperature Protection OTW and OTE) from Texas Instruments.

TPA3255 has a two-level temperature-protection system that asserts an active-low warning signal (CLIP_OTW) when the device junction temperature exceeds 120°C (typical) and, if the device junction temperature exceeds 155°C (typical), the device is put into thermal shutdown.

Like @Luminair said, my Cambridge Audio being a class A/B is massive, has holes/perforations on the metallic top cover, massive heatsink + a fan that would turn on/spin 99% of the time that I used it even at very low volume. With all of that, the amp would still get warm and would routinely shut itself down. I had kept it at the top of my TV console where it received enough air flow (see picture). I live along the Equator, average daily temp is about 25°C, So the 47°C wouldn't really be that much of a problem for me.

With all this in mind, I am satisfied that the heat that I described coming from the BT20A Pro is not a cause for alarm. As @MatB has said, the temperature doesn't change when playing music... it just holds constant in my use case. I believe that if the heat became an issue, the amp would go into thermal shutdown. The amp has not once shutdown on me.


edited_cambridge_amp.png
 
First of all, thanks amirm for the review!

Finally, I've got my blue BT20A Pro with the orange knob 45 days after purchase.
Overall, I like it very much!

Unfortunately, my device gets pretty hot. Even if I place the BT20 elevated, with free airflow around, the metal body gets very warm.
I've measured 43 °C/109,4 °F on the top of the case!
If I place it in my normal living room shelf it gets unbearable hot. I cannot stack it there, where my WiiM Pro and SMSL D-6 are staying at cool temperatures.

The crazy thing about this is that the device gets this hot only by turning it on. When playing music, it gets barely hotter than that. After shutting the device off, the case gets back to normal levels.
I have the version with the 48V power supply. The power supply itself stays cool.

Does anybody else get these temperatures?
@Fosi Audio is my device malfunctioning?

For reference: none of my other Class D Amps/DACs gets noticeably above room temperature.
I have had the same problem with this amp getting really hot. I was testing the pre-amp stage connected to my Nad C 352 when i noticed. Plus the bass and treble don't work when using it as a pre-amp stage to a power amp. Another problem I noticed is when the volume is turned pass 12 there is an annoying ticking coming through the tweeters.
I have contacted Fosi and they have asked me to send the amps circuit board back to them for testing. I have the 48V power supply.
I have seen that other folks are experiencing the same problems.
 
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I'm thinking about drilling holes, applying outside heat sinks or even installing a fan
You should just return it and find an amp that suits your needs. That might mean lower power, more efficient, more heatsinking, or a power-saving mode so it's cooler while idle. But again, the device itself doesn't care that it's hot; it's working as intended.
 
I asked Fosi here in some thread about heat efficiency with their 3255 amp using 48v psu and he said they have had enough testing or something like that.
But I have had a bit higher heating issues with Fosi TB10d kept on TV table in open space with all the air flow around it and so had to send back the unit to Amazon.
OTOH, I have 2 Aiyima A07 Pro units running with 48v psu without any heating observed.

Is it unreasonable for these little 3255 amps with such closed enclosure to run a little bit hotter ??? Probably not!!!
But it’s annoying.
 
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You should just return it and find an amp that suits your needs. That might mean lower power, more efficient, more heatsinking, or a power-saving mode so it's cooler while idle. But again, the device itself doesn't care that it's hot; it's working as intended.

@MatB @Luminair After about 5hrs of watching movies and listening to music (Bluetooth and RCA), I used an infrared thermometer and found that the BT20A Pro (with 48V PSU) stayed constant at 40°C
 
Has anyone replaced the opamps? Is so, what difference do you hear?

Has Amir tested that?
 
Perhaps wait for Fosi Audio V3, venting holes on both sides.
Here it comes
 
Is it just me or is this thing pretty impressive? Too bad almost none of these have AUX/Sub outs. If you need that it really limits one's choices.
 
Let me preface, I’m new to anything audio. Looking for any advice on what this capacitor’s purpose is and input on what went wrong. As you can see, there are only remnants of the original capacitor. To be fair, I was running it pretty hard at 48v. I replaced the capacitor with a same spec Nichicon and I am still not getting any sound output. Any input on where to check for other possible collateral damage is greatly appreciated.

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Let me preface, I’m new to anything audio. Looking for any advice on what this capacitor’s purpose is and input on what went wrong. As you can see, there are only remnants of the original capacitor. To be fair, I was running it pretty hard at 48v. I replaced the capacitor with a same spec Nichicon and I am still not getting any sound output. Any input on where to check for other possible collateral damage is greatly appreciated.

View attachment 295835View attachment 295834
Noice! I'm sure you did, but did you connect the capacitor negative to negative and positive to positive?
 
@geauxwandering if you don't mind let me know when you have those measurements that I suggested for you. They are critical to starting the process.
 
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