• WANTED: Happy members who like to discuss audio and other topics related to our interest. Desire to learn and share knowledge of science required. There are daily reviews of audio hardware and expert members to help answer your questions. Click here to have your audio equipment measured for free!

Embracing Simplicity in Audio: Anyone Else Skipping Room Correction, Measurement Microphones, and the Like?

MattHooper

Master Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Jan 27, 2019
Messages
6,906
Likes
11,337
For example
Wasn't even responded to.

He obviously knows very well that most ASR members are enthusiasts for room correction etc! He knows many here have been happier going that route.
The whole point is he was asking input from those who have NOT gone that route, and why. Therefore responding "I love room correction and here's why!" is not answering his question.

If someone wants to post that of course they can. But I don't see why the OP is beholden to address those posts when he was looking for exactly the opposite
input. It's hardly a black mark on the OP.


I would be interested if the discussion was about "how I took some measurable steps to get reasonable bass response in an un-eq'ed system, despite my room fighting me tooth and nail!";) We would first have to acknowledge that our rooms have >10dB peaks and valleys in the bass frequencies. Understand some of them are due to the dimensions of the room, and we can utilize placement, treatment, and perhaps EQ to either energize or mitigate. And some are due to placement to boundaries, and all the other things that I think we commonly struggle with. And at least some of the struggle can be understood a bit better. But it just goes round and round because we can't seem to agree that all of our rooms look something like this:
index.php

Without a doubt, speaker placement will impact the peaks. This measurement can be made with a $30 microphone with equipment we are all using to post on ASR!

Ok, so you are interested in a different thread theme than the one the OP had in mind. I don't see why this entails being negative about the OP.
 

DLS79

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 31, 2019
Messages
366
Likes
276
There seem to be a lot of enforcers on this forum.

Science is not an excuse to force others to follow your chosen route. It doesn’t make someone wrong if they have made a conscious decision not to do something knowing what the scientific and practical benefits may be. There could be any number of reasons why someone‘s personal choice differs from yours.

I agree that spreading misinformation is wrong, but I think it’s fair to say that the majority of people here who have been into audio for a number of years do actually know what they are talking about and understand the pros and cons regarding their own decisions for the way they listen to music.

The OP asked if any others like him have chosen thus far not to partake in measuring their setups. He didn’t ask to be put on the righteous path and manspalined to. It‘s listening to music for crying out loud - no need to be high and mighty over it.


@MattHooper a perfect example for you!
 
OP
computer-audiophile

computer-audiophile

Major Contributor
Joined
Dec 12, 2022
Messages
2,565
Likes
2,859
Location
Germany
I've seen one or 2, but they vanished fairly quickly (minutes).
Ok, I see, then it's probably irrelevant to me. Maybe it was a mistake? I admit that I often correct typos in posts or when I think my English sentence structure or something is wrong. I'm sometimes to fast with the send button and I'm still learning to write in English. :)
 

DonR

Major Contributor
Joined
Jan 25, 2022
Messages
2,934
Likes
5,538
Location
Vancouver(ish)
Ok, I see, then it's probably irrelevant to me. Maybe it was a mistake? I admit that I often correct typos in posts or when I think my English sentence structure or something is wrong. I'm sometimes to fast with the send button and I'm still learning to write in English. :)
Only the best threads require a referee. Too boring if everyone agrees unless there is lots of humour.
 

fpitas

Master Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Jul 7, 2022
Messages
9,885
Likes
14,139
Location
Northern Virginia, USA
that was state of the art at one point!
Keele Horn.jpg


Don Keele demonstrating the principle behind his advanced radial horn.
 

fpitas

Master Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Jul 7, 2022
Messages
9,885
Likes
14,139
Location
Northern Virginia, USA

Purité Audio

Master Contributor
Industry Insider
Barrowmaster
Forum Donor
Joined
Feb 29, 2016
Messages
8,845
Likes
11,744
Location
London
Is that haircut also Engineer chic?
Actually all nerd stereotypes may have birthed from that very photograph.
Hair, glasses, pens in pocket, questionable trousers.
Keith
 

fpitas

Master Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Jul 7, 2022
Messages
9,885
Likes
14,139
Location
Northern Virginia, USA
I was more influenced by Jean-Michel le Cléac'h from Paris.
Keele's horn was a revolution in consistent dispersion, and maintaing dispersion to high frequencies, although it needs EQ. Jean-Michel's horn suffers from the beamwidth narrowing as frequency goes up. Not a big problem if you sit right on-axis, but unsuitable for professional designs.
 

Rednaxela

Major Contributor
Joined
Mar 30, 2022
Messages
1,987
Likes
2,584
Location
NL
The whole point is he was asking input from those who have NOT gone that route, and why. Therefore responding "I love room correction and here's why!" is not answering his question.
But it is answering everything else that he drenched this little request in.

See below. Highlighted is the actual question.

Embracing Simplicity in Audio: Anyone Else Skipping Room Correction, Measurement Microphones, and the Like?

I've always considered myself an early adopter, perhaps even an avant-gardist, when it comes to hi-fi technology. Over the course of the hi-fi journey, there have been paradigm shifts – the transition to CDs, later embracing streaming, and the shift from bulky floor-standing speakers to sleek active monitors, just to name a few.

In my experience, I've found success in keeping my signal paths straightforward. I've been hesitant to transform my regular home listening environment into an acoustic laboratory with heavy computer usage or reliance on proprietary DSP products. Call me old-fashioned, but I value the simplicity of my setup.

Are there others out there who, like me, choose to forgo room correction, measurement microphones, and other sophisticated tools in favor of a more straightforward audio experience? I'd love to hear about your approaches, experiences, and the reasoning behind your decision.

Is simplicity still a virtue in the ever-evolving landscape of audio technology?

The non-highlighted parts are full of response triggering rhetoric. Intentionally or not, the controversy has been there from post #1.
 

Multicore

Major Contributor
Joined
Dec 6, 2021
Messages
1,589
Likes
1,652
There's something to be said for simplicity.
Acquisition of the player, refurbishing it, keeping it in good working order. Choosing and sourcing needles. Acquiring, storing, cleaning, indexing media.

I think one thing we learned in this thread is that "simple" is in the eye of the beholder.
 

MAB

Major Contributor
Joined
Nov 15, 2021
Messages
2,059
Likes
4,637
Location
Portland, OR, USA
Ok, so you are interested in a different thread theme than the one the OP had in mind. I don't see why this entails being negative about the OP.
That is one way to put it but not really what I meant! I should know better than to give concrete examples!!!;)

In all seriousness, I think measurements are fundamental. Part of the reason the audio industry exists in such a circle of confusion is the lack of reasonable specs from manufacturers and fact-free hype from the many HiFi reviews and publications It's an echo-chamber where measurements are unwelcome. Leads to all sorts of odd pseudo-science like fancy cables, fancy feet, green pens, etc. More practically, randomly moving around speakers and furnishings and changing rooms without knowing what the various room modes are. Not understanding how the room measures and interreacts with your speaker is the antithesis of ASR. It may come across as snarky or condescending if you want to take it that way, it really isn't my intent.
 
Last edited:

fpitas

Master Contributor
Forum Donor
Joined
Jul 7, 2022
Messages
9,885
Likes
14,139
Location
Northern Virginia, USA
Acquisition of the player, refurbishing it, keeping it in good working order. Choosing and sourcing needles. Acquiring, storing, cleaning, indexing media.
Feeding the dog.
 

droid2000

Senior Member
Forum Donor
Joined
Jan 8, 2023
Messages
370
Likes
388
That is one way to put it but not really what I meant! I should know better than to give concrete examples!!!;)

In all seriousness, I think measurements are fundamental. Part of the reason the audio industry exists in such a circle of confusion is the lack of reasonable specs from manufacturers and fact-free hype from the many HiFi reviews and publications It's an echo-chamber where measurements are unwelcome. Leads to all sorts of odd pseudo-science like fancy cables, fancy feet, green pens, etc. More practically, randomly moving around speakers and furnishings and changing rooms without knowing what the various room modes are. Not understanding how the room measures and interreacts with your speaker is the antithesis of ASR. It may come across as snarky or condescending if you want to take it that way, it really isn't my intent.

Measurements are fundamental and required. It's the science part of audio. Without it you are left with superstition and witchcraft. This forum is not named audioforum.com. You gotta add the science. The whole point for it's creation. The whole point we're all here. No one here should be interested in going back to the dark ages. I don't wanna live in caves anymore. The enlightenment is here. Be a Renaissance man. Not a caveman. Thank you Amirm. You have made us all better humans :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: MAB

Multicore

Major Contributor
Joined
Dec 6, 2021
Messages
1,589
Likes
1,652
All part of the ritual. Some people enjoy the masochism. I am partial to FM radio myself.

That can get complicated too. I had a yagi on a rotator on the roof for years.

My grandparents had a Bush TR82 on top of the fridge. That was relatively simple with only MW and LW bands. They listened to The Archers on it. We had to be perfectly quiet while that was on or leave the kitchen.
 
Top Bottom