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Avantone CLA-10 (Yamaha NS-10M Clone) Review

Rate this studio monitor

  • 1. Poor (headless panther)

    Votes: 153 90.0%
  • 2. Not terrible (postman panther)

    Votes: 7 4.1%
  • 3. Fine (happy panther)

    Votes: 4 2.4%
  • 4. Great (golfing panther)

    Votes: 6 3.5%

  • Total voters
    170

rocksteady

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Note the apostrophe.
Hey? That apostrophe is wrongly used there. To indicate a Plural, simply add an S. Regardless, I was asking about the existence of the SP-10s. I had assumed the Poster was referring to Speakers? The SP-10 was obviously a Turntable…
 
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rocksteady

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Every time a pro audio product is being reviewed this forum goes crazier with fantasies and assumptions then any audiophile believers forum. Sound engineers don't know better than audiophiles, sound engineers must have serious hearing loss and so on.

For a start, I have never seen this Avantone in a commercial studio. It's not because someone makes a speaker and calls it a monitor, that it's effectively being used by audio pro's. Major logic error.



Don't know what you mean by that, but this actually was a common thing to do. That is, until Yamaha recognised engineers didn't really appreciate the overly bright character of these speakers and came with a second generation with reduced highs. So far for the deaf sound engineers myth.

And from practice I can tell you, if you could make a mix work on NS10's you were golden. It's hard work to pull that off. And of course you still finalise your mix on state of the art monitors.
By Second generation, do you mean the Pro and Studio? I have read that they’re technically identical,
but the Tweeter designation on the Studio has an added A. Could you confirm this?
 

mhardy6647

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Dec 12, 2019
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The SP-10 was a pretty good studio deck. Had one here for a wee bit (dump find) but passed it along to someone who'd make better use of it than I.
 

LSPhil

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Jan 26, 2024
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After reading about the NS10 speakers on Wikipedia, I learned that the Tieton membrane is made of a sheet of paper.
This fact raises the question: How can speakers known for their subpar sound be used for mixing?
It is a known fact that they are indeed used. They are also utilized for home listening, as mixes created on these monitors sound best on the NS10 at home. However, the major challenge lies with those who own linear speakers and must listen to recordings where 5 dB are missing from 1 kHz, and the bass ends at 80 Hz.
By the way, I noticed that when analyzing the impedance curve, the NS10 exhibits the following parameters: F0=100Hz, Qtc=0.83. These parameters are almost ideal for Dolby home cinema. When combined with an RXA filter set at 80 Hz, an acoustic Linkwitz Riley 24 dB/octave is created.
Upon comparing the characteristics of the NS10 and LS3/5a, I understood that I need to replicate my linear speakers using EQ corrections to listen to old recordings mixed on these monitors.
Currently, I am listening to a playlist found on the internet on Spotify titled "Rogers LS3/5a." What do you think is the reason behind creating this playlist? In conclusion, both were measured by Amira:
 

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Deleted member 21219

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This fact raises the question: How can speakers known for their subpar sound be used for mixing?
They are also utilized for home listening, as mixes created on these monitors sound best on the NS10 at home.


Jim
 

goat76

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The only confusion that’s (still) going on here is that some of you guys seem to think that all things done in music production are dependent on the frequency response of one studio monitor. One monitor used during one of many stages of music production, one tool among many other tools will hardly ever dictate the outcome of the final product.

In a similar way…
Must we all be using a magnifying glass to be able to appreciate a photo, just because someone did use the zoom function in Photoshop while editing the picture? :)
 
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