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Any AV receivers with built in equalizers ?

Bsmooth

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I see most of the speaker reviews and most If not all need a little tweaking as far as bumps and dips in there response. Pretty sure Roon is used most of the time. I was jkust wondering If any receivers have the ability to do this as well?
 
As far as a graphic eq, that's what Denon & Marantz units have, but is separate from using the Audyssey eq. You can manipulate the Audyssey EQ better with their editor app.

Yamahas have a built in parametric eq, somethwat combinable with YPAO as far I've seen, but no experience.

Recent Piononkyo offerings have Dirac Live, but somewhat still intertwined with their AccuEQ/MCACC backgrounds.

Sony I haven't followed, I have an old unit with nothing like room eq or a graphic eq....just tone controls.

Then there are the boutique brands with some other offerings.
 
Sony has the worst normal EQ. Its +10db Bass & +10db Treble for each section [Ex: Fronts] (Normal EQ not Room Correction). You can't tweak any specific frequencies, that's what the reviewers won't tell you ;) .

For reference, my Sony STR-DN1080 came with a stereo mic. In terms of Sony's Room Correction, Its just called "Auto Calibration". Regardless of setup, you need a subwoofer even if you tell it you have no subwoofer, thanks Sony :facepalm:. The Calibration process is probably the best I ever seen, takes a 1 minute and its accurate. When compared to my fathers Onkyo (Uses mono mic) takes about 5 minutes and its fine for accuracy. After it's done doing it's thing, you choose the "calibration type":
  • Full Flat: Makes the measurement of frequency from each speaker flat.
  • Engineer: Sets to “the Sony listening room standard” frequency characteristics.
  • Front Reference: Adjusts the characteristics of all of the speakers to match the characteristics of the front speaker.
  • Off
Just remember when having room correction enabled, your AVR puts the input source through a "Digital Workspace". Every AVR is different but its between 44.1khz to 96khz. That's why my Sony's ""Native DSD"" is disabled if I want room correction. Analog sources might (depending on your equipment) sound better with Room Correction off [Pure Direct Mode] (For example: Outside DAC).
 
Only reason I was asking is to get my corrections dialed in the same as Amir does when he does his speaker corrections. So this is possible with modern AV receivers ? Also how many frequency bands do they have. I'm guessing here, but I think Roon's is a ten band isn't it ?
 
Only reason I was asking is to get my corrections dialed in the same as Amir does when he does his speaker corrections. So this is possible with modern AV receivers ? Also how many frequency bands do they have. I'm guessing here, but I think Roon's is a ten band isn't it ?
If you got deep pockets
 
So this is possible with modern AV receivers ?
Yes. So what I listed was the built-in room correction software that is included on board most AVRs. This is a mostly automated process that happens after you run through the automated measurement mic process. (Modern AVRs will include a basic measurement mic.) There are some minor manual tweaks you can make (e.g., speaker size, gain levels on individual speakers). @Chrispy listed out various solutions for manual EQ that you do yourself; this is much closer to what Amir does with Roon when he tests speakers.

But make sure you understand what Amir is doing:
  • He's a trained critical listener. His skills at seeing measured FR for a speaker and then tuning by ear are (no offense) going to be far better than what you or I could do.
  • He's running EQ on a single speaker in near-field.
  • He's working in a room where he knows the existing room issues.
If you're looking to integrate a 5.1 or 7.2.2 or whatever system it'll be far easier to start with the automated room correction process. After that you can make manual adjustments if you find the room EQ system missed / miscalibrated something (these apps aren't perfect), or you can make manual adjustments to get to your preferred curve.
 
Yes my Yamaha does that, its older though so no equalizer, other than Center for dialogue. So a modern Denon would have better capabilities. Say a particular speaker had a bump in the midrange, you could tame it by using the built in equalizer, especially If it was already tested and found a certain setting would tame it a bit.
 
Yes my Yamaha does that, its older though so no equalizer, other than Center for dialogue. So a modern Denon would have better capabilities. Say a particular speaker had a bump in the midrange, you could tame it by using the built in equalizer, especially If it was already tested and found a certain setting would tame it a bit.
Which model Yamaha are you using?
 
Hard to believe considering but its a classic the RX-V757, not the same as my older classic the CR-1020 which sadly I don't have anymore.
 
My Yamaha Rx A1070 has full parametric EQ. You can manually edit the YPAO results or just enter filters manually. 7 bands.
 
Not my Yamaha RX-V685. It has YPAO, but if there’s a way to adjust the PEQ manually, I haven’t found it.

But the RX-V line is their cheaper offering, as I understand it.

Rick “YPAO does an acceptable job for me for TV watching” Denney
 
Use one of these with an amp of your choice, I've even heard they give better results than a miniDSP

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Hard to believe considering but its a classic the RX-V757, not the same as my older classic the CR-1020 which sadly I don't have anymore.
Your manual indicates your avr has both YPAO and PEQ...
 
I have the manual and the only available eq is for the center channel only. Thats mainly for matching the other speakers and dialogue.
 
I have the manual and the only available eq is for the center channel only. Thats mainly for matching the other speakers and dialogue.
The page I saw mentioned all channels, didn't dig into it after I saw mention of each channel being affected. I see now there is a GEQ for the center particularly. Perhaps YPAO's use of PEQ is limited to the auto setup only? Didn't seem that way on page 24 where I first looked....
 
Not particular to equalizers, but since I am talking about equalizing speakers. What would you say the receiver with the best sound is that has Audyssey MultEQ XT32 ?
I've heard its the best version. Is it limited to just high end receivers ?
I saw the great review here of the Denon AVR-X3600H, sadly its an older model and isn't available. Too bad as it was a perfect upgrade and rated well here too !

 
The Denon X3700 has replaced the 3600, and is the entry level to XT32 and full set of pre-outs in the Denon lineup. Dirac Live enabled avrs, like now being marketed by Onkyo/Pioneer, are said to be better by some, no experience myself.
 
I had just read in a few reviews the Denon receivers had a warmer sound, but maybe I was mistaken with that. I do know Amir thought that the X-3600 was one of the better AV's he had tested.
 
I wouldn't bother with a description like "warmer" sound in an avr or even its room eq routine....Denons have tested well here.
 
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