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TANCHJIM One IEM Review

Rate this IEM:

  • 1. Poor (headless panther)

    Votes: 5 3.2%
  • 2. Not terrible (postman panther)

    Votes: 3 1.9%
  • 3. Fine (happy panther)

    Votes: 48 30.4%
  • 4. Great (golfing panther)

    Votes: 102 64.6%

  • Total voters
    158

Jimbob54

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so the difference between 3.5mm and dsp is that you cannot change the cable in dsp right??
I believe you can change the cable on the DSP one. The difference is that you don't need a dac /amp (or headphone socket) for the DSP one.
 

staticV3

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so the difference between 3.5mm and dsp is that you cannot change the cable in dsp right??
The earpiece has a standard 2pin connection, so you can switch cables however you like.

The regular Tanchjim One comes with a 3.5mm cable, which you can see in the image above.

The One DSP comes with a USB-C cable where the USB-C plug contains a USB Bridge, DSP, DAC, and headphone Amp.

You can configure the DSP from an Android device and your settings will be stored on the cable.

The One DSP can be plugged into any computer/phone/tablet that supports USB Audio output.
 

mc.god

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so the difference between 3.5mm and dsp is that you cannot change the cable in dsp right??
There is a different model from Tanchjim called Zero that has fixed cable sold in distinct 3.5 and dsp (type-c) version.
 

CedarX

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There is a different model from Tanchjim called Zero that has fixed cable sold in distinct 3.5 and dsp (type-c) version.
Same for the Tanchjim Tanya: it has a fixed cable—like Tanchjim Zero, but unlike One—and it is sold in either 3.5mm or USB-C DSP versions.
The price between Zero, One, and Tanya is pretty close. I’m sure they sound different (slightly or significantly, YMMV), which could become a moot point for the DSP versions—as long as the 5x peaking filters available through the app are enough to “correct” whatever defect/issue they may have and customize the FR to you liking with reasonable distortion.
Beyond these potential caveats/pitfalls, the choice between Zero, One, Tanya DSP versions boils down to preference, fit and comfort!
 
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CedarX

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I’m aware that there isn’t an iOS app for this but does the microphone work with iPhone?
Since you talk about an app, I assume the question is relative to the One-DSP version.

I don’t have the latest iPhone 15, with USB-C, so can’t answer definitely. The One-DSP is UAC1 compliant, so if Apple did not screw it up, the mic should work.

For lightning versions: you obviously need some lightning to USB-C adapter or cable… and to have any chance of making this work, the adapter needs to be MFI certified, or have the right chip inside. I tried with my ddHifi TC28i adapter and the One-DSP mic did not work for phone calls (it works fine for music listening). It doesn’t mean it won’t work with other adapters!
 
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Frank of America

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Since you talk about an app, I assume the question is relative to the One-DSP version.

I don’t have the latest iPhone 15, with USB-C, so can’t answer definitely. The One-DSP is UAC1 compliant, so if Apple did not screw it up, the mic should work.

For lightning versions: you obviously need some lightning to USB-C adapter or cable… and to have an any chance of making this work, the adapter needs to be MFI certified, or having the right chip inside. I tried with my ddHifi TC28i adapter and the One-DSP mic did not work for phone calls (it works fine for music listening). It doesn’t mean it won’t work with other adapters!
Thank you for your response. Correct, yes, the DSP version. I have Apple adapters.
 

CedarX

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https://apps.apple.com/us/app/tanchjim/id6446278638
There is an app for the iPhone though.
I don't have a USB-C iPhone neither an lightning to usb c adapter to confirm wether or not it works.
All I can say is the microphone works on my apple silicon macbook via the USB C port.
I can confirm that the iPhone Tanchjim app does not work with the One-DSP--at least not on Lightning iPhones. I believe the app is solely for Tanchjim Bluetooth thingies.
The One-DSP exposes (at least) two USB interfaces:
  • One UAC-1 compliant audio interface (up to 24/96). This is perfectly supported by the iPhone and, assuming the right Lightning to USB-C adapter, audio from the iPhone plays fine on the One-DSP.
  • A second interface (exact type?) supporting the communication between the app and the One embedded DSP. Apple imposes quite stringent restrictions on USB communications, and that's most likely why it does not work on iOS... I don't know if it is even possible.
AFAIK the same is true for the iPhone and Qudelix 5K: you can only control the Q5K from an iPhone through Bluetooth, not through a USB cable (with BT disconnected). However, the iPhone can play audio through the USB cable (again contingent upon the right adapter/cable) or through BT...
 

Jeromeof

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https://apps.apple.com/us/app/tanchjim/id6446278638
There is an app for the iPhone though.
I don't have a USB-C iPhone neither an lightning to usb c adapter to confirm wether or not it works.
All I can say is the microphone works on my apple silicon macbook via the USB C port.
I just go my Tanchjim one with the usb-c cable and I am afraid the iPhone app doesn't work even on my usb-c iPhone 15 Pro (that app just seems to want to look for bluetooth only Tanchjim devices so I guess doesn't work with usb-c based ones). So need to digg out my old Android smartphone to configure the DSP.

But my 30 minute initial listening impression of this IEM is that it is great, the microphone does work on iOS also. I actually like the 'bullet' shape, compared to the large shells on the various 'Zero' IEM's.
 

Jeromeof

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Just trying 2 of the similar apps that I have on IOS (the Qudelix and the FiiO control) and both cleverly detect their device is connected via USB-C but then popup inside their apps to get the app to 'pair' with the device, obviously this is a way around any limitations.

Note: It's not a technical limitation as MFI 'licenses' can access their usb devices in IOS.

So I guess it's probably not worth these IEM manufacturers to pay Apple whatever licence fee would be required for custom USB communication to configure their devices over USB.
 

5-pot-fan

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I have just received my new Tanchjim Ones - my first purchase inspired by ASR!
The reason for the purchase was that my existing iems ( Apple Earpod – some years old) do not fit securely and fall out frequently, especially if I move my jaws (eat/drink), although they do not sound bad to me.

My initial setup: using Foobar2000 with no eq, connected via 3.5mm stereo jack on my laptop.

On first listen my immediate response was “where's the music ?” There was no sense of a soundstage and the sound was 'thin'.

I checked to confirm the iems were inserted correctly. They were a good fit and the connections were L->L, R->R, etc.
I ran some sound tests :
phase - up – down – L-R tests
tones down to 45hz and up to my hearing level around 11khz

I ran the same on the Earpods – the results all seemed very similar to me between the 2 iems.

I installed and enabled Foobar Mathaudio PEQ with filters set following the outlines from @amirm's review. Changes were apparent but there was no particular improvement when using the T Ones.

I then noticed that the Foobar Output preferences were set to “Headphones (Realtek audio)”. I changed this to “Headphones (Realtek audio) Exclusive“ and noted a major improvement.

Swapped back and forth between the 2 headphone settings – the Exclusive one is the keeper.
I changed back to Earpods which sounded more bassy and muddy.
I then removed the peq – the Earpods are better without the T One peq (no eq at all).
Swapping between the T Ones with PEQ and the Earpods with no eq - Earpods still preferred. They present a much more lively mid-bass.

I did my best to equalise volume between the 2 devices but not sure I succeeded.

Can anyone offer comments for further improvement?

Edit – changed the plugs to the largest set, on the basis that the iems need to sit a bit further out from my eardrums. The fit did not seem particularly more snug but there is better bass and the sound is more enjoyable – my foot is now tapping! I will persevere!
 

Jeromeof

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I have just received my new Tanchjim Ones - my first purchase inspired by ASR!
The reason for the purchase was that my existing iems ( Apple Earpod – some years old) do not fit securely and fall out frequently, especially if I move my jaws (eat/drink), although they do not sound bad to me.

My initial setup: using Foobar2000 with no eq, connected via 3.5mm stereo jack on my laptop.

On first listen my immediate response was “where's the music ?” There was no sense of a soundstage and the sound was 'thin'.

I checked to confirm the iems were inserted correctly. They were a good fit and the connections were L->L, R->R, etc.
I ran some sound tests :
phase - up – down – L-R tests
tones down to 45hz and up to my hearing level around 11khz

I ran the same on the Earpods – the results all seemed very similar to me between the 2 iems.

I installed and enabled Foobar Mathaudio PEQ with filters set following the outlines from @amirm's review. Changes were apparent but there was no particular improvement when using the T Ones.

I then noticed that the Foobar Output preferences were set to “Headphones (Realtek audio)”. I changed this to “Headphones (Realtek audio) Exclusive“ and noted a major improvement.

Swapped back and forth between the 2 headphone settings – the Exclusive one is the keeper.
I changed back to Earpods which sounded more bassy and muddy.
I then removed the peq – the Earpods are better without the T One peq (no eq at all).
Swapping between the T Ones with PEQ and the Earpods with no eq - Earpods still preferred. They present a much more lively mid-bass.

I did my best to equalise volume between the 2 devices but not sure I succeeded.

Can anyone offer comments for further improvement?

Edit – changed the plugs to the largest set, on the basis that the iems need to sit a bit further out from my eardrums. The fit did not seem particularly more snug but there is better bass and the sound is more enjoyable – my foot is now tapping! I will persevere!
It's best to use an app like ToneGen to test if you have a good seal (or even on Crinacle website there is a tone generator testing tool) then play a test tone at say 40hz, then 30hz and even 20hz and see if you can hear the bass/sub-bass. If not, then I find with most IEM's the tuning will be completely off. They are tuned by default to assume a reasonable good seal.
 

markanini

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I then noticed that the Foobar Output preferences were set to “Headphones (Realtek audio)”. I changed this to “Headphones (Realtek audio) Exclusive“ and noted a major improvement.
Seems your audio system is applying some unwanted processing, normally there should be no discernable difference.

To answer your question, trying the included tips for good fit and seal is a great start. Next, there's some manufacturer sanctioned EQ settings. Maybe someone with the DSP version can share them here for you to try.
 

CedarX

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To answer your question, trying the included tips for good fit and seal is a great start. Next, there's some manufacturer sanctioned EQ settings. Maybe someone with the DSP version can share them here for you to try.
The Tanchjim App offers 5 presets for One-DSP : "Default" (that's the factory-preset for the One-DSP), "Nature", "Balanced", "Popular", and "Musical Instrument".
This is different from the usual Pop, Rock, Jazz... and these presets appear more interesting than usual in regards to targets & preference scores--see above post from @Eddie_Vanjovi. I don't want to read too much into it, but the presets may also tell something about what Tanchjim was trying to do with the One IEM.

Tanchjim One Presets.jpg

* "Maiky76" EQ in the above graph is actually their "Harman Redux", limited to 5-filters.

A few interesting details...
  • All of the Tanchjim presets have negative gain. I don't know if it's because the app "assumes" a 0dB preamp gain, even though it allows +/- 12dB, or this is Tanchjim "style" of defining their EQ filters. It may also contribute to the "lack of power" perception of the Tanchjim DSP's relative to the non-DSP's.
  • Amir did notice a distortion peak at 8.7 kHz but commented it was not much of concern. On the Tanchjim side, four of the 5 presets, including "Default", have a relatively narrow -2dB filter at 8.3 kHz. I believe, it's about the same distortion peak, and Tanchjim indirectly acknowledges its presence in their DSP presets. This warrants some A/B listening... One could ask why they did not address the issue if they knew about it... I think this is actually a good example of the value of embedding a DSP into a entry-level IEM: the distortion peak was probably a tradeoff Tanchjim could not address within the design/marketing/cost constraints they had (it's an entry-level IEM !!!). They are not trying to hide the facts, but propose an easy, almost free, "fix" in the DSP version...
  • "Balanced" is the only preset without this 8.3 kHz filter. I wonder if it is because it relates to some target FR or the 8.3 kHz filter was discarded for a more relevant/impactful filter (EDIT: it is indeed "eaten" by the 6.0 kHz filter on that particular DSP preset).
  • Tanchjim seems also concerned about the 1,000-3,000 FR, as shown with their 1,400 Hz filter, not present in Amir or @Maiky76 EQ. More listening needed!
EDIT: Forgot to tie that back to Tanchjim One non-DSP version... For the mod's: It's actually not completely off-topic !!! ;)
The DSP presets from Tanchjim are, indirectly, their take on their own product... The "Default" DSP preset represents what Tanchjim most likely intended for One, but they also leave users the choice to start from something pretty close to the Harman target (Amir's measurements, which should represent what you get on the DSP version when all the filter gains are at "0"). The other presets can be seen as alternate starting point proposals from Tanchjim. You choose what sounds best to start from, one of the presets, or no filters, and you EQ to your liking, within the constraint of 5 PK filters (should be more than enough for the Tanchjim One IMO...).
Again, I may try to read way too much into that stuff, but if it is indeed what Tanchjim is doing, I really like it !!! :)


Tanchjim App Preset Values (Preamp gain ??)

Default
Filter 1: ON PK Fc 50.0 Hz Gain -2.5 dB Q 0.50
Filter 2: ON PK Fc 200.0 Hz Gain -4.0 dB Q 0.80
Filter 3: ON PK Fc 1400.0 Hz Gain -1.5 dB Q 2.00
Filter 4: ON PK Fc 6000.0 Hz Gain -5.0 dB Q 1.50
Filter 5: ON PK Fc 8300.0 Hz Gain -2.0 dB Q 5.00

Nature
Filter 1: ON PK Fc 50.0 Hz Gain -7.0 dB Q 0.20
Filter 2: ON PK Fc 200.0 Hz Gain -3.0 dB Q 0.70
Filter 3: ON PK Fc 1400.0 Hz Gain -2.0 dB Q 2.00
Filter 4: ON PK Fc 6000.0 Hz Gain -4.0 dB Q 1.50
Filter 5: ON PK Fc 8300.0 Hz Gain -2.0 dB Q 5.00

Balanced
Filter 1: ON PK Fc 30.0 Hz Gain -3.0 dB Q 0.50
Filter 2: ON PK Fc 200.0 Hz Gain -5.0 dB Q 0.70
Filter 3: ON PK Fc 3000.0 Hz Gain -2.0 dB Q 1.50
Filter 4: ON PK Fc 6000.0 Hz Gain -5.0 dB Q 1.00
Filter 5: ON PK Fc 1000.0 Hz Gain -1.0 dB Q 3.00

Popular
Filter 1: ON PK Fc 3000.0 Hz Gain -0.5 dB Q 0.50
Filter 2: ON PK Fc 200.0 Hz Gain -6.0 dB Q 0.50
Filter 3: ON PK Fc 1400.0 Hz Gain -2.0 dB Q 2.00
Filter 4: ON PK Fc 6000.0 Hz Gain -4.0 dB Q 1.50
Filter 5: ON PK Fc 8300.0 Hz Gain -2.0 dB Q 5.00

Musical Instrument
Filter 1: ON PK Fc 100.0 Hz Gain -1.5 dB Q 1.00
Filter 2: ON PK Fc 200.0 Hz Gain -5.0 dB Q 0.50
Filter 3: ON PK Fc 1400.0 Hz Gain -1.5 dB Q 2.00
Filter 4: ON PK Fc 6000.0 Hz Gain -1.0 dB Q 1.50
Filter 5: ON PK Fc 8300.0 Hz Gain -1.0 dB Q 5.00
 
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Jimbob54

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The Tanchjim App offers 5 presets for One-DSP : "Default" (that's the factory-preset for the One-DSP), "Nature", "Balanced", "Popular", and "Musical Instrument".
This is different from the usual Pop, Rock, Jazz... and these presets appear more interesting than usual in regards to targets & preference scores--see above post from @Eddie_Vanjovi. I don't want to read too much into it, but the presets may also tell something about what Tanchjim was trying to do with the One IEM.

View attachment 340720

A few interesting details...
  • All of the Tanchjim presets have negative gain. I don't know if it's because the app "assumes" a 0dB preamp gain, even though it allows +/- 12dB, or this is Tanchjim "style" to define their EQ filters. It may also contribute to the "lack of power" perception of the Tanchjim DSP's relative to the non-DSP's.
  • Amir did notice a distortion peak at 8,700 kHz but commented it was not much of concern. On the Tanchjim side, four of the 5 presets, including "Default", have a relatively narrow -2dB filter at 8,300 kHz. I believe, it's about the same distortion peak, and Tanchjim indirectly acknowledges its presence in their DSP presets. This warrants some A/B listening... One could ask why they did not address the issue if they knew about it... I think this is actually a good example of the value of embedding a DSP into a entry-level IEM: the distortion peak was probably a tradeoff Tanchjim could not address within the design/marketing/cost constraints they had (it's an entry-level IEM !!!). They are not trying to hide the facts, but propose an easy, almost free, "fix" in the DSP version...
  • "Balanced" is the only preset without this 8,300 kHz filter. I wonder if it is because it relates to some target FR or the 8.300 kHz filter was discarded for a more relevant/impactful filter.
  • Tanchjim seems also concerned about the 1,000-3,000 FR, as shown with their 1,400 Hz filter, not present in Amir or @Maiky76 EQ. More listening needed!

Tanchjim App Preset Values (Preamp gain ??)

Default
Filter 1: ON PK Fc 50.0 Hz Gain -2.5 dB Q 0.50
Filter 2: ON PK Fc 200.0 Hz Gain -4.0 dB Q 0.80
Filter 3: ON PK Fc 1400.0 Hz Gain -1.5 dB Q 2.00
Filter 4: ON PK Fc 6000.0 Hz Gain -5.0 dB Q 1.50
Filter 5: ON PK Fc 8300.0 Hz Gain -2.0 dB Q 5.00

Nature
Filter 1: ON PK Fc 50.0 Hz Gain -7.0 dB Q 0.20
Filter 2: ON PK Fc 200.0 Hz Gain -3.0 dB Q 0.70
Filter 3: ON PK Fc 1400.0 Hz Gain -2.0 dB Q 2.00
Filter 4: ON PK Fc 6000.0 Hz Gain -4.0 dB Q 1.50
Filter 5: ON PK Fc 8300.0 Hz Gain -2.0 dB Q 5.00

Balanced
Filter 1: ON PK Fc 30.0 Hz Gain -3.0 dB Q 0.50
Filter 2: ON PK Fc 200.0 Hz Gain -5.0 dB Q 0.70
Filter 3: ON PK Fc 3000.0 Hz Gain -2.0 dB Q 1.50
Filter 4: ON PK Fc 6000.0 Hz Gain -5.0 dB Q 1.00
Filter 5: ON PK Fc 1000.0 Hz Gain -1.0 dB Q 3.00

Popular
Filter 1: ON PK Fc 3000.0 Hz Gain -0.5 dB Q 0.50
Filter 2: ON PK Fc 200.0 Hz Gain -6.0 dB Q 0.50
Filter 3: ON PK Fc 1400.0 Hz Gain -2.0 dB Q 2.00
Filter 4: ON PK Fc 6000.0 Hz Gain -4.0 dB Q 1.50
Filter 5: ON PK Fc 8300.0 Hz Gain -2.0 dB Q 5.00

Musical Instrument
Filter 1: ON PK Fc 100.0 Hz Gain -1.5 dB Q 1.00
Filter 2: ON PK Fc 200.0 Hz Gain -5.0 dB Q 0.50
Filter 3: ON PK Fc 1400.0 Hz Gain -1.5 dB Q 2.00
Filter 4: ON PK Fc 6000.0 Hz Gain -1.0 dB Q 1.50
Filter 5: ON PK Fc 8300.0 Hz Gain -1.0 dB Q 5.00
Just out of interest- is it possible to use your own PEQ settings and/or disable any DSP in the cable. I just ordered the DSP version with a grand plan to maybe use the cable elsewhere but that wont work if I am tied to one of the presets.
 

staticV3

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Just out of interest- is it possible to use your own PEQ settings and/or disable any DSP in the cable. I just ordered the DSP version with a grand plan to maybe use the cable elsewhere but that wont work if I am tied to one of the presets.
You can choose Custom sound in the list of presets, which leads to a menu where you can set frequency, gain, and Q for each of the five Peaking filters:
Screenshot_20240109-183516_TANCHJIM.png Screenshot_20240109-183251_TANCHJIM.png

Set the gain to 0dB for each filter and the DSP is effectively disabled.
 

Jimbob54

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CedarX

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Brilliant- as I hoped.
Actually, that’s how I got the preset filters: you select one of the Tanchjim presets; the app saves it & resets the IEM (meaning it temporarily "disconnects" the IEM, no sound for a fraction of second, and then you get the nagging Android popup to re-allow full USB access to the Tanchjim app); then in "custom sound" you can see whatever is currently saved onto the DSP--the preset you selected..
Another detail: in "custom sound", the changes you made are immediately effective (real time). It's only when you tap "save" that it resets the IEM. Your settings are then carried over, following the IEM.

The Tanchjim app has none of the limitations of the Monndrop app, and is definitely easier/nicer to use! But it's only 5 peaking filters (like Moondrop CDSP cable whIch also uses a KTmicro chip).

I haven't found time for detailed measurements, but I suspect the filters are biquad-based, meaning the FR in the highs will vary depending on the sampling frequency (Fs) of what you are playing. This is speculative, but I would not be surprised if the Tanchjim app calculates the biquads coefficients assuming a Fs of 48 kHz. It only matters if one enters filters above 10 kHz: trying to match the Knowles target would be a concern if you mix tracks at 44.1 and 96 kHz (Tanchjim One-DSP is UAC-1 compliant, 24/96 max.)
 
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