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StormAudio & Grimani Systems presented an 11.6.6 fully digital, networked, AES67 Audio-over-IP demonstration.

sarumbear

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It looks like we are getting there: StormAudio & Grimani Systems will present an 11.6.6 fully digital, networked, AES67 Audio-over-IP demonstration at CEDIA Expo 2023.

The collaboration will showcase networked Audio-over-IP technology, while bringing together the collective expertise and best practices from top industry brands.

The demo highlights the launch of StormAudio’s new ISP Evo 32-channel AoIP surround sound preamp/processor, the first all-digital immersive audio processor to reach the CEDIA channel, networked to a Grimani Systems 16,800-watts, 11.6.6 channel active loudspeaker system.

Utilsing a fully digital pathway from source-to processor-to the speaker system,the design requires only Ethernet cable, a network switch, and speaker cable for its audio connections. According to Anthony Grimani, “After having worked on more than 1,000 systems, this is the future of audio for theatres, media rooms, and commercial spaces.”
 

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Vacceo

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I´m feeling a bit obtuse, so I´d rather ask than stay ignorant. If I understood the article correctly, the way the system works is that the processor does all the decoding, EQ adjustment and processing in the digital domain, sends a digital signal and it is up to the speakers to turn that digital signal into analog and amplify it. In summary, this is a system meant for active speakers. I´m I getting it right? It uses Grimani speakers, but it could be done with Genelecs, as they also take digital signals.

Here´s my question, however: what do you get that you wouldn´t with a more conventional HT system?
 
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ban25

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I´m feeling a bit obtuse, so I´d rather ask than stay ignorant. If I understood the article correctly, the way the system works is that the processor does all the decoding, EQ adjustment and processing in the digital domain, sends a digital signal and it is up to the speakers to turn that digital signal into analog and amplify it. In summary, this is a system meant for active speakers. I´m I getting it right? It uses Grimani speakers, but it could be done with Genelecs, as they also take digital signals.

Here´s my question, however: what do you get that you wouldn´t with a more conventional HT system?
It's mostly a benefit to large theater spaces because it's easier to do long and complex runs with a switched fabric like ethernet. Could also work for very small systems: if the space is already wired for networking, you're good to go, just add a processor and speakers. Where it becomes disadvantageous for home use is in the 9/11/15-speaker configuration because you have to route AC power to all of those speakers around the room. There's a photo floating around this site of a user with I think a 5.1 Genelec setup and while I'm sure it sounds nice, it looks like.... :)
 

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I am sure a full Genelec the Ones HT, in the right space and well-adjusted, sounds incredibly good. I have seen setups like those in production and mastering studios, so it should be perfectly possible to do.

However, with the inconvenience of plugging each spekear (doable if planned, of couse), I´m not sure how much better it would be than a passive system built with KEF or Perlisten passives (to name a couple excellent manufacturers of speakes). Sure, ground loops and interferences become a non-issue working with digital transmission, but that can be a non-issue too with passives.

Perhaps the best aspect comes from the use of active systems and how adjustable DSP´s can get on each one of the speakers, and in that, I see an advantage; however, I really don´t know how much better that solution can be in your, or my living room.
 

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I´m feeling a bit obtuse, so I´d rather ask than stay ignorant. If I understood the article correctly, the way the system works is that the processor does all the decoding, EQ adjustment and processing in the digital domain, sends a digital signal and it is up to the speakers to turn that digital signal into analog and amplify it. In summary, this is a system meant for active speakers. I´m I getting it right? It uses Grimani speakers, but it could be done with Genelecs, as they also take digital signals.
Not necessarily. You can use digital input power amplifiers as well.

Here´s my question, however: what do you get that you wouldn´t with a more conventional HT system?
There are no multiple DAC/ADCs in the signal chain.
 

Vacceo

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There are no multiple DAC/ADCs in the signal chain.
How problematic is that for the signal chain? I´m asking not to be mean, but to actually know. From what I have red here, that should not be an issue except for latency, and that can be compensated.

Now, if you tell me that the price to pay to eliminate boxes and dramatically increas the capacity to tune up the system further than with passives, that I see as a very worthy tradoff from having plugs around, because listening spaces are usually less than ideal.
 
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sarumbear

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How problematic is that for the signal chain? I´m asking not to be mean, but to actually know. From what I have red here, that should not be an issue except for latency, and that can be compensated.
Just read combined DAC/ADC unit tests here and see the huge drop in performance.

Now, if you tell me that the price to pay to eliminate boxes and dramatically increas the capacity to tune up the system further than with passives, that I see as a very worthy tradoff from having plugs around, because listening spaces are usually less than ideal.
What I said above.
 

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It looks like we are getting there: StormAudio & Grimani Systems will present an 11.6.6 fully digital, networked, AES67 Audio-over-IP demonstration at CEDIA Expo 2023.



I have a hard time to understand why this is making the news. Hundreds of networked PA speakers are routinely used for production live, broadcast or others (and now for years). Audio over IP replaced MADI a few years ago. Most PA speakers, amp etc are AoIP enable. I do not see the benefit for home audio, ADAT or MADI was doing as well.

One case is nice: POE aka Power Over Ethernet. When you can also get the power from the same cable as internet. You are currently limited in Watt but that works well for surround for example.
 
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ban25

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There are no multiple DAC/ADCs in the signal chain.
I see no reason why a conventional passive system needs more than a single DAC, as that is the most common use-case in Home Theater anyway.
 
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sarumbear

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I have a hard time to understand why this is making the news. 100 Dante capable networked PA speakers are routinely used for prod (and now for years). Audio over IP replaced MADI a few years ago. Most PA speakers, amp etc are AoIP enable. I do not see the benefit for home audio, ADAT or MADI was doing as well.

One case is nice: POE aka Power Over Ethernet. When you can also get the power from the same cable as internet. You are currently limited in Watt but that works well for surround for example.
Show me a AVR/AVP that use any of those?
 
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sarumbear

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I see no reason why a conventional passive system needs more than a single DAC, as that is the most common use-case in Home Theater anyway.
When you use a modern active system with an AVR/AVP, what happens?

What is in your subwoofer?
 

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It's mostly a benefit to large theater spaces because it's easier to do long and complex runs with a switched fabric like ethernet. Could also work for very small systems: if the space is already wired for networking, you're good to go, just add a processor and speakers. Where it becomes disadvantageous for home use is in the 9/11/15-speaker configuration because you have to route AC power to all of those speakers around the room. There's a photo floating around this site of a user with I think a 5.1 Genelec setup and while I'm sure it sounds nice, it looks like.... :)
A potential advantage in the home would come from using Power over Ethernet for surround speakers reducing cabling.
 

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One case is nice: POE aka Power Over Ethernet. When you can also get the power from the same cable as internet. You are currently limited in Watt but that works well for surround for example

Flipping this around to Powerline Ethernet would resolve the power issue.
 
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sarumbear

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A potential advantage in the home would come from using Power over Ethernet for surround speakers reducing cabling.
Will it? A passive speaker requires a single cable as well :)
 

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NTK

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Will it? A passive speaker requires a single cable as well :)
But you only need one CAT5e (or better) cable to/from the processor. The individual PoE cables to the speakers can be branched off from switches/power injectors distributed over the room/building. (e.g. One cable to the ceiling, then branch off from a switch in the ceiling to the individual speakers.)
 

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This is the rigth way to do things , you should also implement the speakers crossover in DSP then every part of signal processing is digital , you take the sound quality hit once .
So I like the principle ( I even bought into similar proprietary system I have an old Meridian HT).

Practical implementation is however the key here , speakers are such a dominant part of final sound so you may prefer a traditional solution.

The most interesting thing here is doing it with some more or less standard parts from different manufacturers with a standard protocol. This is new !

Full digital HT has been problematic due licensing and copy protection issues , which has crippled development of home theater audio forever.
 
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