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Speakers against front wall - can this be settled?

Speakers within 1m of front wall

  • I tried this and had imaging issues, WITH front wall acoustic treatment

    Votes: 3 5.6%
  • I tried this and had imaging issues, without front wall acoustic treatment

    Votes: 9 16.7%
  • I tried this and had midrange tone issues, WITH front wall acoustic treatment

    Votes: 2 3.7%
  • I tried this and had midrange tone issues, without front wall acoustic treatment

    Votes: 2 3.7%
  • I tried this and had other issues (other than too much bass)

    Votes: 3 5.6%
  • I can't wait to try this

    Votes: 2 3.7%
  • It's great!

    Votes: 33 61.1%

  • Total voters
    54

bo_knows

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I don't even want perfect I want 80 to 200 to not just disappear. Plenty of others doing it with cheaper and smaller rooms so I guess. I just have bad luck with my room.
Don't kid yourself. EVERYONE has a problem(s) in the bass, upper bass, and sometimes midrange region in the small room. I've acoustically treaded my room more than most and still have dips in the bass and midrange region.
Whoever tells you that they don't, ask them to show you REW sweep from 20-300Hz without any smoothing and without EQ with the mic being positioned in the MLP using only their main speakers. ;)

Yes, very frustrating to deal with dip(s) if you rely only on passive acoustic treatments.
 

srrxr71

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So I moved into a new space and after GLM calibration I found that my left speaker has a sharp dip at 125hz and a slightly less sharp one at 250Hz. Both speakers are 6” from the front wall as moving them out causes more problems.

I’m not as worried about the 125hz as I think the subwoofer might be able to help it even crossed over at 100Hz.

For the 250Hz I’ve ordered today GIK 244 flat bass traps to place behind the speakers. They are 4” I believe but they claim to absorb from 100Hz-about 500Hz.

They are 4” but they seem to have fiberglass construction which they claim to make them perform down to 100Hz. I wonder if that’s true. I guess I’ll find out soon.
 

SDC

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Far from wall, easy fix with subs. Close to walls, room treatments a must.
fr compensation to fix allison effect such as w371 system, even better.
I have many systems, 40cm and 2m they all work just in different fashion.

But I agree far from walls are exceptionally easier….
 

Chromatischism

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I have not read the thread responses and will just respond with my experience moving speakers against the wall, out from the wall, narrower, wider, toe angle, you name it. This is in a perfectly rectangular room with ideal positions for seating based on avoiding room modes.

I have heard the advice that for best stereo image the speakers should be away from the front wall.

Is this "away from the front wall" advice because:

-For full range speakers there is so much bass boost that it "overpowers" the image? (activating room modes, which could be fixed with eq to reduce bass)
As you say, room correction takes care of this issue.

Or, perhaps "away from the front wall" is total nonsense?
It's definitely not, from my personal experience.

I would guess that a lot of people have their speakers in the 3-6ft AVOID! range. That cancellation/comb filtering doesn't seem fixable by EQ according to this note from Genelec "Equalization of the monitor output level does not help, as the same level change applies also to the reflected sound."
You are right. Most of us will end up in that range with little we can do about it.

However, even with upper bass/lower midrange SBIR, they still sound better away from the wall.

What I heard when 6" from the wall + room correction: perfect bass with no dips. I also heard a sort of congestion, hardness, lack of clarity from the midrange.

What I hear when 2' from the wall + room correction: much more open and clear sound. Better separation of detail. The bass is not perfect however to hear the issues you really need to focus and play sine waves.

There is more to consider, though. When the speakers are moved, there is another variable that is changing: your distance to the speakers. This can affect where you sit in the polar response, and how much reflected sound you are getting. If you move the speakers back a couple of feet, you move the first reflection points back as well. When you're sitting closer, you're hearing fewer reflections as a component of the sound and it will sound more clear and intimate. This is a sound I prefer.

So when you read people's experiences about moving speakers back and forth, keep in mind they are probably not moving their seats to match and their listening distance is changing, as are the reflection points and direct-to-reflected sound ratio. This affects clarity, imaging, and soundstage. Having speakers against the wall has its own effects and it is hard to separate them.
 

Chromatischism

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The optimal configuration in my opinion for medium to small rooms is to have the speakers more than a meter away from a boundary, and have Subwoofers crossed at 80Hz.

This way the null will be in the range where the subwoofer is playing
This has been my experience, however I can't afford a meter; mine are at about .75m. My nulls are very sharp and hardly heard, and they occur around the crossover, so the subs are picking up any slack.
 

Thomas_A

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Just a note and question. When you tell the distance from the wall the relevant distance SBIR-wise is the driver to wall distance. I have toed in and a midwoofer to damping panel distance of 25 cm and to the wall 32 cm. This gives if I calculated correctly a first cancelation at 268 Hz.
 
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