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Digitising Vinyl, Audio Interface?

daftcombo

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#41
I have both a Concorde and Super OM body. I've noticed no peculiar interactions among styli between them. My impression is that the Super OM body is electrically different than the older Concorde body, but the styli are the same and interchangeable, at least as far as I know. The 'problem' with the Concorde is that you won't be able to adjust alignment, if that is an issue for you.
That's what I thought and still believe. The Ortofon guy said there could be problens though, because of those "electrical differences".

The damping thing is a tradeoff
IME the only bad consequence of the damper was that a few scratched records, which played with one or two skips, can now play with three or four, because the needle don't want to leave the groove and desires to follow every path.
I've not found yet a record that played without a skip and now won't though, I guess I'm lucky.
 

andreasmaaan

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#42
Yes, they are more detailed than the Concorde Pro and a very pleasant listening.
FWIW, this website records the output from reviewed cartridges and allows you to compare them (a bit limited as the track choices are not consistent, but better than nothing). Here are the 03-M and the AT-XP5, for example.
 

Frank Dernie

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#44
Thanks :) I've never been happy with the sound of the various Ortofon Concordes (too bright/harsh IMO) or Shure's range of DJ cartridges (too boomy and indistinct IMO). I quite like the sound of Audio Technika's AT-XP line of DJ cartridges in comparison. None of these compare to good hifi cartridges though.

Have you compared the 03-M White to any of these? Any thoughts on sound quality?
The high frequencies of the Ortofon MM cartridges are extremely sensitive to the load capacitance and can sound bright or dull if either side of optimum. Lots of phono stages have no adjustment and the cable may not be enough.
 

Frank Dernie

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#45
Higher end Ortofon replacement styli are not inexpensive, though.
Excepting some elaborate coil winding strategies the cantilever and stylus are by far the most expensive parts of a cartridge. Micro line and Shibata styluses are massively more difficult and time consuming to grind than conical
 

Willem

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#46
In the old days Quad provided input boards taylor-made for the most common top quality cartridges. I had one for the Shure V15iii.
 

andreasmaaan

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#47
The high frequencies of the Ortofon MM cartridges are extremely sensitive to the load capacitance and can sound bright or dull if either side of optimum. Lots of phono stages have no adjustment and the cable may not be enough.
Good to know, thanks Frank :)
 

daftcombo

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#48

anmpr1

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#49
Excepting some elaborate coil winding strategies the cantilever and stylus are by far the most expensive parts of a cartridge. Micro line and Shibata styluses are massively more difficult and time consuming to grind than conical
No doubt. But Ortofon charges much more for their line contact variants than, say, AT charges for their Micro Ridge diamond (which, incidentally, appears to be sourced from the Adamant Namiki Precision Jewel Company).

And, oddly enough, AT charges more for their Shibata and Line Contact cut, than the more radical Micro Ridge diamond. I have no information as to where AT sources their Shibata and LC diamonds, but one has to conclude that they are more costly on a per unit basis, even if they are not necessarily as good (distortion and tracing-wise) as the MR shape.
 

Joachim Herbert

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#52
I use VinylStudio with an Audient ID14 for recording. VinylStudio provides the all equalization curves one might think of plus declicking, seperating and tagging recorded tracks. Its easier to use than RX6 and provides functionality tailored to digitize vinyl.

Cartridge is an (EMT) TMC63, turntable a vintage Thorens TD524 (also based on EMT technology.

What I am missing is a way to adjust load resistance and capacity. Mismatches lead to uneven frequency response plus maybe too much or too little damping.
 
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maty

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#53
With mint vinyls or good vinyls (well washed) the sound is better without any type of soft processing. Before buying a vinyl you have to be very well informed and even then sometimes it is not right with the best pressing, editing or remaster.

Very expensive hobby.

Btw, just now, marvelous music and sound:

Frank Sinatra - September of My Years (1965), Vinyl, stereo, Universal 2015 Re, Holland
https://www.diyaudio.com/forums/music/6958-playing-listening-post5794284.html

 
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#54
what a nice, long discussion! I'll have to ruin it by saying - get your FLACs, including vinyl rips via torrents! :) $0 investment.
But it sounded like your recording are the rare and raw ones. I can just imagine those early gramophone sounding recording you will get :D
 
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#55
The OP mentions he'd be coming from his stereo amplifier line out. This is similar to my use of my stereo system's second preamp outputs. I play an LP on my turntable and use a TASCAM DR-05 PCM recorder to capture the vinyl play at 96kpbs 24bit. I then take the recording on the MicroSD card and transfer it to my computer where I use Vinyl Studio software to re-create the album with tracks, cover art, etc. It is then added to my foobar2000 library. Great stuff!
 
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daftcombo

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#56
what a nice, long discussion! I'll have to ruin it by saying - get your FLACs, including vinyl rips via torrents! :) $0 investment.
But it sounded like your recording are the rare and raw ones. I can just imagine those early gramophone sounding recording you will get :D
Some of the records I rip are NOT available on the dark web most hidden torrents yet and if they are, it can be in poor quality.
 
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