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Digitising Vinyl, Audio Interface?

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#21
Thanks once again for the replies. It's both interesting and helpful.

Regarding the audient i4, I was close to getting it as many consider it a rival, and in some cases better than the 2i2! It also comes with tons of software (admittedly some I would not use I'm sure!)
 

daftcombo

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#22
An advert

To create good vinyl rips, in addition to vinyls in good / excellent condition, you have to spend a lot of money. It requires a time of learning and being very well advised.

For mediocre, poor, humdrum... ripping, no problem.
I don't agree with you if by "a lot" you mean "thousands". Several of my friends have quite cheap (between 800$ and 2.000$) setups and manage to get vinyl rips that sound as good as 40.000$ setups.
 
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#23
Regarding the audient i4, I was close to getting it as many consider it a rival, and in some cases better than the 2i2! It also comes with tons of software (admittedly some I would not use I'm sure!)
Looks like the ID4 has an instrument an a microphone input. For your intended purpose I would pick something with 2 mic/line inputs.
 
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#24
Yeah, hence why I discounted it after realising. However, if I was in the market for an interface like that it give it serous consideration!

Right now I'm thinking Behringer is the way to go, unless anyone has other suggestions around the same price point? I can't see anything else until you get to 2i2 sort of level really.

Purely out of interest, how would this behringer stack up against the x-fi HD? Guessing it beats it hands down?
 

maty

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#25
If you want to listen to very good vinyls with high DR from classical, jazz, acoustic music... a good cartridge > € 700 .

To listen commercial music as badly recorded is other story.

I have already warned. I do not want to enter into discussions.
 
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daftcombo

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#26
If you want to listen to very good vinyls with high DR from classical, jazz, acoustic music... a good cartridge > 700 euros.

To listen commercial music as badly recorded is other story.

I have already warned. I do not want to enter into discussions.
Alright, but I'm satisfied with my Ortofon SuperOM 20 on a TT with a fluid damper, and I don't expect much if I spend more. Also, I would be too afraid to damage an expensive needle!

Which cartridges would you recommend?
 
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#27
At the moment, that type of music isn't in my collection, but who knows what the future will bring!

My collection does have some 'clean' tunes produced more recently, but plenty of muddy hardcore from 92 made in someone's bedroom on an Amiga and pressed a few day later on a white. Never going to win quality production awards, but somehow the rawness of it just gives it an exciting edge :)

I think I'll hunt out a Behringer :)

If I do turn to the sort of sounds you mention in the future I'm sure my entire setup would change, so I'd revisit it then I feel. Never the less, your comments are very interesting.

Thanks all.
 
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#28
Alright, but I'm satisfied with my Ortofon SuperOM 20 on a TT with a fluid damper, and I don't expect much if I spend more. Also, I would be too afraid to damage an expensive needle!

Which cartridges would you recommend?
I get this with some of my expensive tunes when I used to mix them, quite a while back mind, scary when I think some of them I got for 2-3 quid 18 years ago are into the triple figures in some cases!
 

daftcombo

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#29
I get this with some of my expensive tunes when I used to mix them, quite a while back mind, scary when I think some of them I got for 2-3 quid 18 years ago are into the triple figures in some cases!
It was another model I think, because the SuperOM 20 is not for mixing and you would kill it.

For DJ-ing I would recommend a pair of Taruya White, which have a very decent sound and could be sufficient for ripping electronic music.
 
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#32
Sorry I think my comment was a bit misleading, all I was doing was drawing a parallel with using an expensive needle and using an expensive tune (i.e. You don't want to scratch it!)

It almost stunts your mixing as you're afraid to handle it as you would a 'normal' record!
 

anmpr1

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#33
Alright, but I'm satisfied with my Ortofon SuperOM 20 on a TT with a fluid damper, and I don't expect much if I spend more. Also, I would be too afraid to damage an expensive needle!

Which cartridges would you recommend?
Your Ortofon will accept a range of styli, from an inexpensive Pro S spherical (tracking at 4 g) to Ortofon's latest and greatest Gyger 40 stylus. They just plug in, and that is that. An arm rebalance is not required--just readjust the tracking force/skating. Higher end Ortofon replacement styli are not inexpensive, though.

BTW, a fluid damper (such as one used to find on the old SME and Micro arms, plus the current KAB Technics mod) are not precision devices. I've noticed that changes in ambient temperature affects the viscosity of the silicone gunk, which in turn has to change the resistive damping effect. Does this also happen on non silicone based oil damped arms? I guess it does, depending upon the viscosity. Shock damping at the stylus (Shure, or even the old Discwasher headshell damper thing) or electro-dynamic damping at the pivot (Denon/JVC/Sony) are more elegant solutions.
 

daftcombo

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#35
Your Ortofon will accept a range of styli, from an inexpensive Pro S spherical (tracking at 4 g) to Ortofon's latest and greatest Gyger 40 stylus. They just plug in, and that is that. An arm rebalance is not required--just readjust the tracking force/skating. Higher end Ortofon replacement styli are not inexpensive, though.
Pay attention that the Ortofon Concorde cartridge and the Ortofon SuperOM cartridge both can accept any stylus BUT when I contacted Ortofon about it, they answered me that there was a difference in impedance or capacitance or anything, and that some combinaisons wouldn't work well.

BTW, a fluid damper (such as one used to find on the old SME and Micro arms, plus the current KAB Technics mod) are not precision devices. I've noticed that changes in ambient temperature affects the viscosity of the silicone gunk, which in turn has to change the resistive damping effect. Does this also happen on non silicone based oil damped arms? I guess it does, depending upon the viscosity. Shock damping at the stylus (Shure, or even the old Discwasher headshell damper thing) or electro-dynamic damping at the pivot (Denon/JVC/Sony) are more elegant solutions.
True but the damper is the only way to play without skipping a few severely warped records that I have. As for sound quality before/after setting it, I didn't hear a difference (but didn't try hard to).
 

andreasmaaan

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#36
Yes, the 03-M is the one. ( I didn't try the others.) Combine it with a fluid damper on a SL1200 MK2 and good luck for skipping a groove!
Thanks :) I've never been happy with the sound of the various Ortofon Concordes (too bright/harsh IMO) or Shure's range of DJ cartridges (too boomy and indistinct IMO). I quite like the sound of Audio Technika's AT-XP line of DJ cartridges in comparison. None of these compare to good hifi cartridges though.

Have you compared the 03-M White to any of these? Any thoughts on sound quality?
 

daftcombo

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#37
Thanks :) I've never been happy with the sound of the various Ortofon Concordes (too bright/harsh IMO) or Shure's range of DJ cartridges (too boomy and indistinct IMO). I quite like the sound of Audio Technika's AT-XP line of DJ cartridges in comparison. None of these compare to good hifi cartridges though.

Have you compared the 03-M White to any of these? Any thoughts on sound quality?
It is very difficult to answer you because I've always used them with mixing tables with the treble, mids and low frequencies set by ear. It was definitely not an audiophile approach.

Before that I used an Ortofon Concorde Pro which sounded fine (definitely not overly bright) but lacked detail. I don't like the sound of the Shure styli that I've been playing with, which sounded messy to me.

The way you settle the cartridge and capacitance load can change the sound and make it bright, I think.
 
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andreasmaaan

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#38
It is very difficult to answer you because I've always used them with mixing tables with the treble, mids and low frequencies set by ear. It was definitely not an audiophile approach.

Before that I used an Ortofon Concorde Pro which sounded fine but lacked detail. I don't like the sound of the Shure styli that I've been playing with, which sounded messy to me.
Thanks, yeh, it's very hard to say haha. But if these sound more detailed to you than the Concorde Pro, that's interesting. Problem is I can't remember which Concordes I've heard, and no doubt there are significant differences between them. Agree re: the Shures I've heard sounding messy.
 

anmpr1

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#39
Pay attention that the Ortofon Concorde cartridge and the Ortofon SuperOM cartridge both can accept any stylus BUT when I contacted Ortofon about it, they answered me that there was a difference in impedance or capacitance or anything, and that some combinaisons wouldn't work well.


True but the damper is the only way to play without skipping a few severely warped records that I have. As for sound quality before/after setting it, I didn't hear a difference (but didn't try hard to).
I have both a Concorde and Super OM body. I've noticed no peculiar interactions among styli between them. My impression is that the Super OM body is electrically different than the older Concorde body, but the styli are the same and interchangeable, at least as far as I know. The 'problem' with the Concorde is that you won't be able to adjust alignment, if that is an issue for you.

The damping thing is a tradeoff. For most situations I think the fluid damper is a reasonable compromise. Another 'solution' to arm/cartridge resonances were the old Dual/Technics EPA counterweight devices. The Dual used a bobbly sub-weight inside the main counterweight; Technics used an oil-magnetic thing to provide damping resistance. In any case, all those devices I mentioned are long gone. I'm using the KAB silicone gunk paddle in the trough, and find that it works OK. I think it helps, but inasmuch as it's impossible to quickly disengage it for A/B comparisons, I'll leave it at that. For the price it's not a bad modification. I certainly don't think it makes things worse.
 

daftcombo

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#40
Thanks, yeh, it's very hard to say haha. But if these sound more detailed to you than the Concorde Pro, that's interesting. Problem is I can't remember which Concordes I've heard, and no doubt there are significant differences between them. Agree re: the Shures I've heard sounding messy.
Yes, they are more detailed than the Concorde Pro and a very pleasant listening.
 
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