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Why not use effects to get the sound of vinyl?

Cbdb2

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So... I've been thinking (dangerously enough) about the thesis of this thread. I got to wondering whether the question posed might (???) be rephrased in a way that might make it more interesting and more useful.
My sub-thesis is that the type and spectrum of noise in LP playback is a factor in the perceived warmth and yumminess of same, but only a factor. Pops and ticks aren't good, full stop, but the low-frequency noise encountered on LP playback (even with an inherently quiet deck), I suspect, imparts a sense of acoustic space that is part of the charm of the medium. I wonder if there's anything else? Heck, who knows, maybe phase shifts relating to the imposition and subsequent correction of the RIAA equalization curve applied when the lacquer is cut?

Even many of the vinylista* will allow that a digitally captured needle drop sounds pretty good; i.e., pretty vinylistic. :)

This got me to wondering whether "null testing" could give some insight into roots of the ('vinyl sounds better') phenomenon. Unfortunately, what probably wouldn't work is nulling the digitized output of playing an LP track with "the same" track from a digital source (i.e., not a needle drop). The master tape (or whatever) used to cut the LP lacquer would almost certainly be different than that used to generate the digital version, if for no other reason than the imposition of RIAA EQ, mixing the bass to mono and/or rolling off extremely low frequencies in the case of the analog pathway.

I don't know enough about anything (as the ramblings above testify!) to devise a way to do an appropriately controlled comparison to see what's really different (besides clicks and pops) between the two sources -- but I'll bet there is a good way(?).

_______________
* of which I would have to count myself as a member, although not a rabid one. :)
Even if the exact same master was used for the vinyl as the digital and all the noise was removed the speed difference and wow and flutter during the digitization of the vinyl would make it almost impossible to line up the bits for null testing.
 

Cbdb2

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Maybe I am missing something? They used an ABCHr test for “preference?” Is that an audible accuracy test with a hidden reference as the objective measuring stick? That’s not preference. A true preference test would not have a reference.

And how did MP3 beat CD? Isn’t that a big red flag in regards to the quality of the data? How is MP3 audibly more accurate than Redbook CD?
They proved what they set out to, which was already obvious to most of us.
"The study concludes that sound quality is not the sole defining factor and that listener preferences are profoundly influenced by other, non-auditory attributes and that such factors are as much a part of the vinyl experience as the music etched into the grooves."
 

egellings

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And thats why I gave it up, did a one to one match of a CD for each vinyl album then ripped these CD's to move to a file based paradigm.

Life is too short for buggering around with all the stuff needed to optimize vinyl playback.

Add in streaming and/or digital downloads and my music horizons expanded way beyond anything I could have imagined/afforded with a vinyl centric system.

Went from a system with boxes for Africa to support vinyl, CD and DVD music videos (now ripped) to a much simplified system (PC->DAC->amp->speakers)


Peter
Vinyl is a hobby that some enjoy and others don't. If you don't like it, just pass it by.
 

Justdafactsmaam

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They proved what they set out to, which was already obvious to most of us.
"The study concludes that sound quality is not the sole defining factor and that listener preferences are profoundly influenced by other, non-auditory attributes and that such factors are as much a part of the vinyl experience as the music etched into the grooves."
They missed the target if they used ABCHr for a preference test
 

fatoldgit

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Vinyl is a hobby that some enjoy and others don't. If you don't like it, just pass it by.

Wasnt criticizing anyone... never said digital playback was better...people are free to playback music using whatever source and equipment they want.

For the record (pun intended) I started collecting vinyl in 1970 and did so up until ~2008.

Concurrently started collecting CD's in 1984 after someone gave me Stevie Ray Vaughan's Texas Flood on CD and I picked up a duty free CD Player while on a trip to OZ the same year.

So I had a foot in the vinyl and digital camps for a long time.

But as noted, as I got older I ran out of patience with the vinyl rituals (and CD's as such since I now only "spin" digital files).

The Slimdevices Transporter I got in 2007 was really the catalyst for the change.

Peter
 
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