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New PC build for audio and video

Nakatomi

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Hi guys, new member here. I need advice.
I am building a new pc for music and video editing. I'm a beginner and I'll use it for guitar recording and making rock music, so nothing too fancy. Drum track, bass, guitar and vocals. I also want to make simple videos for Youtube, like tutorials, videos for kids, etc.
My budget is app. 1300 to 1400euros, without peripherals.
My first doubt is should I go Intel or Amd? Which is better in this budget for audio and video editing?
I still don't now what audio interface should I buy, maybe Focusrite 2i2, Audient id4 or something similar in entry budget. For Daw I will probably use Cakewalk or Mixcraft. For video still not sure since I am a beginner.
Can you please suggest me a pc configuration for my needs?
Thanks!
 

Ron Texas

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Video editing requires a very fast GPU with lots of memory. An extra $100 on the GPU will get you more than that spent on most other components. Get a Nvidia RTX 4060 or 4060 Ti at a minimum. Brand of CPU is not important although an AMD CPU and compatible motherboard might cost less than Intel at the same performance level. Davanci Resolve is a top rated free video editor.
Search for benchmarks.

https://benchmarks.pugetsystems.com...ark=davinci&application=&specs=#results-table
 

Count Arthur

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I would decide which video editing software you're going to use, then look for benchmarks, to see whether AMD or Intel work better at your budget.

Also how much RAM and the GPU influence the performance of your chosen video editing software, to decide how best to divide your budget between CPU, GPU and RAM.
 

DVDdoug

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I can't make any specific recommendations, and there are LOTs of unknowns when it comes to how much processing power you'll need.

"Simple" stereo or mono recording isn't too demanding. I've been recording & editing audio since the DOS days! Multitracking and/or "high resolution" of course requires the processing of more data.

Usually it's "other stuff" (applications, drivers, processes running in the background) that interferes & interrupts the audio. And your operating system is always multitasking, even if you're only running one application. And the "other stuff" doesn't have to using a lot of total CPU power, it just has to hog the system for a few milliseconds too long and you get buffer overflow and get a glitch. A faster-more powerful computer can finish-up the other stuff faster, so it does help all the way around...

Multiple tracks with multiple real-time effects will also require more processing power.

The same is true for video. You usually don't need real-time processing so lack of speed/power just slows down processing and doesn't hurt quality.

If you are getting a Windows computer, there is a FREE online book about optimizing your computer for audio called Glitch Free.

One feature I'd look for in an interface is zero-latency direct-hardware monitoring, where you can monitor yourself without going through the computer. (You can still monitor a backing-track from the computer.) There is always SOME latency (delay) through the computer because of the buffers that are required by the multitasking operating system. If you can use larger buffers without worrying about the higher latency you are less likely to get glitches from buffer overflow (recording) or buffer underflow (playback & monitoring.)
 

Dunring

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This is the basis for a system I just recently built for myself. It's got plenty of performance without melting down a credit card. Also it's very efficient on power and doesn't need water cooling. The mainboard has a really well shielded panel to keep interference down for plugging audio into for USB connections. The dual channel memory gives a performance boost of 10 percent, and the video card also is optimized to work with it using an AMD CPU. I play games and breeze through occasional video editing.

AMD Ryzen 5 5600X Desktop Processor 6-core 12-Thread Up to 4.6GHz Bundle with MSI MAG B550 Tomahawk

XFX Speedster SWFT309 AMD Radeon RX 6700 XT

G.SKILL Ripjaws V Series (Intel XMP) DDR4 RAM 32GB
 

Sombreuil

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My first doubt is should I go Intel or Amd?
Depends on the kind of CPU you're looking for. Generally speaking, both AMD & Intel are about the same, though, the X3D ones are pretty insane.
Also, make sure your DAW supports e/p cores if you go Intel, Cubase used to struggle with those for example.
 

DLS79

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Can you please suggest me a pc configuration for my needs?

Imo, You need to provide some more detailed information, it you want to get good suggestions.
  • How many cameras are you using?
  • what resolution and framerate is the video the footage?
  • what codec if the footage using, what bit depth is the footage, what chroma sampling does it have?
  • the same as the above for the audio.

Pretty much all modern higher end NLEs are constrained by the footage/audio you are working with.

I run DaVinci Resolve Studio on a machine that costs several times your target budget, and I can still bring it to its knees depending on what source material I'm using and what I'm doing to it.

Even just editing audio can really hammer a machine. For example chaining de-reverb, NR, de-breath, de-esser, de-click, de-plosive.
 

Blumlein 88

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Don't know how reliable this advice is. You can search for video editing builds at various budget levels.

 

DLS79

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Don't know how reliable this advice is. You can search for video editing builds at various budget levels.

neither of those two are very good as he is just resharing very generic information.


For example consider 2 of my cameras, a hacked Panasonic G7, and a Panasonic GH5. Both shoot UHD h.264 at 30p, but they support different bit depths and chroma subsampling's. The G7 does 8bit 4:2:0, while the GH5 does 10bit 4:2:2.

Just about any gpu built in the last decade will happily hardware accelerate decoding of the G7 footage, but even the latest generation flagship models from Nvidia & AMD won't touch the GH5 footage, as they don't support hardware accelerated decoding of 4:2:2 footage. Thus the CPU, has to use software to do the decoding and thus must be more performant.

Here is a high level overview of Nvidia's hardware accelerated encoding and decoding api.

nv-proviz-encode-decode-diagram-2461893.png



here is the breakdown by gpu generation and model.


I've run Nvidia and AMD gpus and for the same generation, their encode and decode features have been on par the last few generations.
 
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Nakatomi

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I would decide which video editing software you're going to use, then look for benchmarks, to see whether AMD or Intel work better at your budget.

Also how much RAM and the GPU influence the performance of your chosen video editing software, to decide how best to divide your budget between CPU, GPU
Hi,
Problem is I can't decide which software to use because right now I don't have a pc, my laptop died, and I can't try them anywhere. First I need to buy a computer to try them out.
I would go with 32gb RAM.
 
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Nakatomi

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One feature I'd look for in an interface is zero-latency direct-hardware monitoring, where you can monitor yourself without going through the computer. (You can still monitor a backing-track from the computer.)
thanks for explanations man. Can you name a few budget models that fit these specs?
 
OP
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Nakatomi

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Depends on the kind of CPU you're looking for. Generally speaking, both AMD & Intel are about the same, though, the X3D ones are pretty insane.
Also, make sure your DAW supports e/p cores if you go Intel, Cubase used to struggle with those for example.
Can you please explain what e/p cores are? I think I would start with Cakewalk or Acoustica Mixcraft because I tried them a long time ago. How do I check that?
 
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Nakatomi

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Imo, You need to provide some more detailed information, it you want to get good suggestions.
  • How many cameras are you using?
  • what resolution and framerate is the video the footage?
  • what codec if the footage using, what bit depth is the footage, what chroma sampling does it have?
  • the same as the above for the audio.
Hi,
1- I will use mobile phone camera and dslr camera
2 - full hd, framerate - don't know, whatever framerate there is on those cameras
3- codecs, bit depth, chroma- don't have the slightest idea hehe,

I am just a beginner. I want to make simple videos for youtube such as tutorials- drawing on a well lit big desk, kids videos with toys and such.
For audio I just want to compose my own music - guitar rhythm, solo, drum track, bass and vocals.
I am not looking to go pro with all this, it is more like a hobby.

Didn't know buying pc would be this complicated hehe.

this is recomendation that I got from my local store, what do you think?

* Intel CPU Desktop Core i5-13400F (2.5GHz, 20MB, LGA1700)
* ID-Cooling SE-226-XT BLACK
* Gigabyte B760 Gaming X, DDR4, s1700 B760 GAMING X DDR4
* KINGSTON 32GB 3600MHz DDR4 CL18 DIMM KF436C18BBK2/32
* GIGABYTE Video Card NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 WINDFORCE OC 12G GDDR6 12GB/192bit, PCI-E 4.0 x16, 2xHDMI, 2xDP, WINDFORCE 2X, Retail
* SSD Western Digital*Black™ SN770 1TB M.2 NVMe WDS100T3X0E
* MSI MAG A750GL PCIE5, 750W, 80 Plus Gold, ATX Form Factor
* Zalman S2 Mid Tower Case
 

DLS79

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Can you please explain what e/p cores are? I think I would start with Cakewalk or Acoustica Mixcraft because I tried them a long time ago. How do I check that?
 

DLS79

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Hi,
1- I will use mobile phone camera and dslr camera
2 - full hd, framerate - don't know, whatever framerate there is on those cameras
3- codecs, bit depth, chroma- don't have the slightest idea hehe,


this is recomendation that I got from my local store, what do you think?

* Intel CPU Desktop Core i5-13400F (2.5GHz, 20MB, LGA1700)
* ID-Cooling SE-226-XT BLACK
* Gigabyte B760 Gaming X, DDR4, s1700 B760 GAMING X DDR4
* KINGSTON 32GB 3600MHz DDR4 CL18 DIMM KF436C18BBK2/32
* GIGABYTE Video Card NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 WINDFORCE OC 12G GDDR6 12GB/192bit, PCI-E 4.0 x16, 2xHDMI, 2xDP, WINDFORCE 2X, Retail
* SSD Western Digital*Black™ SN770 1TB M.2 NVMe WDS100T3X0E
* MSI MAG A750GL PCIE5, 750W, 80 Plus Gold, ATX Form Factor
* Zalman S2 Mid Tower Case

that build looks like it should be ok for fhd, though I would still advise you check the video specs.
 

1st.Virtual.Me

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If you're considering a laptop, a Framework 16 could be a good option. It's not cheap, but you can configure it without a GPU for now, and add one later. Same for starting with low amount of ram and SSD, and ports, add and upgrade more as you need them.

And an interface choice is the Topping E2x2. It has a great headphone amplifier and other great measurements.
 

voodooless

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I would think that you don’t need a massive GPU for video editing. More important are the hardware encoders. Check if whatever you need is supported. My bet is that you could do just fine on integrated graphics if you’re not doing crazy stuff. If you get an RDNA 3 integrated GPU (like 7800G), you should have plenty of power. Obviously the 3060 will do nicely as well. If you’re on a budget it may be interesting. You can always upgrade later.

Maybe get 64GB of memory. Also, 1TB of storage will not be enough. Video projects are big! Better get 2 or 4 TB, or fall back to spinning discs for archiving.

Also note that new gen CPUs from AMD seem to be close to release.. may be worth the wait…
 

b7676

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A new Intel build is for flagship overclocking and the fastest memory controller.
AMD rules the midrange. (Mobos: x670 uses double of the chipset, b650e gets more better pcie for gpu+nvme use than b650)
The only passing ddr4 build is the 5800x3d / 5700x3d.
3060 is a good pick for the moment.
The standard modern mid case design is the lian li O11 series, air mini is supplied with 3 good fans.
 
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kemmler3D

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Which is better in this budget for audio and video editing?
Whichever one gives you the best value / dollar on benchmarks within your budget. Don't ask here, there are sites that track this stuff: https://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu_value_available.html

I would think that you don’t need a massive GPU for video editing.
A lot of modern video editing processes are GPU accelerated, so it comes into play for not just rendering but editing as well.

I agree that you should go for a 40xx GPU if you can, although they're pushing your budget, a 4080 super is considered an okay value in that range.

As for audio interface, you will probably be fine with something like a MOTU M2.

The CPU doesn't need to be super high-end for the type of audio work you are planning to do.
 

voodooless

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A lot of modern video editing processes are GPU accelerated, so it comes into play for not just rendering but editing as well.
Sure, but it’s nothing any simple can handle nowadays. It’s not millions of triangles, not hundreds of frames per second.

The op wants to do some basic editing at 1080p. You don’t need a 40x0 for that. It’s an utter waste of money if you have it for only video editing.
 
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