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State of the art Home Theatre - how?

Soundmixer

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Seriously? :facepalm:

Independent control of the dialog is a fantastic idea. It's much better than common workarounds of just boosting the whole center channel or turning on subtitles/closed captions.

Control of the dialog is fantastic. Any control beyond that is not helpful.
 

abdo123

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Dude, you identify LBIR and SBIR first using measurements, move your speakers (or sub(s) either further or closer to the front wall, use absorption (or diffusion) for treatment for early reflections, and THEN use room correction.



You could move the sub into the null thereby driving it, or you could add another subwoofer (or four).

Dude, this is not an insurmountable issue!

So you admit what you said is misinformation? cool.
 

Newman

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…What is your idea of SOTA? And I understand this is personal preference and why there is no consensus on this.
I think you have gone off the rails and not understand the generic meaning of SOTA. It means the current state of the art. That is what the word ‘state’ implies in SOTA. You have been musing on TUEOTAE: The Ultimate Expression Of The Art, Ever.

A SOTA discussion on AV is about what is currently on the market — and is limited to being used with recordings that are currently on the market. Or at most, recordings that have definitely been announced by the major players as coming, definitely, in the near time frame.

Also, to bring SOTA discussions further into reality, and prevent them quickly funneling into “Trinnov! And 16 Focal Grand Utopias! And 12 Super Mega Subwoofers of Choice!”, it is also very instructive to discuss “What is the SOTA in today’s AV market for (say) $10K, split between processor and speakers?” That would be very interesting. And take reliability into account, along with usability. Not helpful if we have to write our own code, or hot-wire the electronics.

cheers
 

Soundmixer

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So you admit what you said is misinformation? cool.

What I said wasn't misinformation, but it certainly needed clarity. It seems clear to me you don't understand exactly what the word misinformation means. Considering I said this previously in this conversation;

"YOu are making this so complicated it is not funny. 4 subs in an SFM setup deals very well with room modes."

Perhaps you should read the entire discussion instead of cherry-picking and then accusing somebody of misinformation.

You stated this;

"LBIR and SBIR nulls are infinitely deep, it's a complete cancelation of the wave, the only thing room correction can do here is blow up your speakers."

LBIR and SBIR not only produce nulls, but they also produce peaks. You neglected to mention that, so is that misinformation? Room correction can most certainly handle a peak even if it cannot fix a null.
 
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mga2009

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If you have a look at the service manual for your AVR and find the analog audio block schematic, you will see a configuration that is quite similar to the one depicted below.

In order to make use of the AVR's onboard volume control in conjunction with your DSP, you will simply need to choose a pair of pins on the NJU (InC and OutC, for instance) and disconnect them from the DAC and amplifier. You can then connect the input to a 2V reference from your DSP (voltage divider on VDD) and the output to one of its auxiliary ADCs.

Within your Sigma Studio project, you will need to create a new volume control object and pass the auxiliary ADC's value to its control input.

Some AVRs will leave one or more volume control IC channels unused (such as channel D above), which may enable you to perform this modification while leaving all of the original signal path untouched. It is important to bear in mind that the NJU channels can be controlled individually, so there exists the possibility that all unused channels are simply muted. This may be worthwhile to test.

Thanks! Sounds difficult. I will start by getting an "old" AVR and tapping the I2S lines, after that we will see about volume knob.

Also, this logic of tapping I2S lines and getting digital audio, is it possible to use a highish end bluray player with 5.1 audio outputs and getting the audio before the DAC?
 

Weeb Labs

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Thanks! Sounds difficult. I will start by getting an "old" AVR and tapping the I2S lines, after that we will see about volume knob.

Also, this logic of tapping I2S lines and getting digital audio, is it possible to use a highish end bluray player with 5.1 audio outputs and getting the audio before the DAC?
Provided said BluRay player includes multichannel analog outputs, yes.

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mga2009

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Provided said BluRay player includes multichannel analog outputs, yes.

Thanks for your reply! That seems to be a cheaper way to start (of course you loose all the AVR function...

I also have one of these HDMI to multichannel I2S board, that works... but I don't have an oscilloscope to check jitter, noise and other problems that this board might have.
 

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Weeb Labs

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Thanks for your reply! That seems to be a cheaper way to start (of course you loose all the AVR function...

I also have one of these HDMI to multichannel I2S board, that works... but I don't have an oscilloscope to check jitter, noise and other problems that this board might have.
Those boards won't perform any decoding, unfortunately. They require an LPCM input.
 

mga2009

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Those boards won't perform any decoding, unfortunately. They require an LPCM input.

I know... AVR it's a better option.

But this board is an starting point for an "all" or "mostly all" digital setup with HDMI input...

I still suspect that having all my media in an HTPC, plus APO Equalizer (for digital XO) and a 16+ channel USB interface, it's a better option.
 

FrantzM

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I know... AVR it's a better option.

But this board is an starting point for an "all" or "mostly all" digital setup with HDMI input...

I still suspect that having all my media in an HTPC, plus APO Equalizer (for digital XO) and a 16+ channel USB interface, it's a better option.
Well … you still have the issue of decoding the latest codecs. At this point in time these are not available to the general public.
 

Weeb Labs

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You might be able to obtain a CS49844A or similar decoder via AliExpress but datasheets are not publicly available, which complicates implementation.
 

archerious

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