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How Do I Keep My Apartment Neighbor From Hearing My Subwoofer?

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#1
I just bought a new pair of speakers and today was the second time I got the downstairs neighbor on my door complaining from the bass shaking his apartment.

I swear it wasn’t too loud ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡° ) but I mean,

What can I do to try to isolate the bass from the floor? Is there any DIY solution? Bass traps?

Do isolators pads as these ones work??

Please advice
 

jtwrace

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#6
Tear all the walls, floor and ceiling out and use resilient channel, double 5/8" Sheetrock with Green Glue between the sheets. That's the only way man.
 

ahofer

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#7
You can decouple the speakers from the floor (if it is coupled now) - that may help the neighbor and not hurt your sound to much. But once that direct coupling is eliminated, I’m not sure there’s anything you can do but turn the offending frequencies, or all frequencies, down.
 

flyzipper

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#12
As others have said... sub frequencies travel fairly easily through most structures.

You could try placing it as close to your listening position as possible (immediately behind your chair, against your lower back, for example), so you may be able to turn it down quite a bit and still achieve the same perceived levels for yourself (yet since it's lower, your neighbours may hear less).
 

Jim Taylor

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#13
I know this sounds insane, but it worked 30 years ago:

Suspend your speakers from the ceiling by means of ropes, with the bottom of the speaker approximately 4 inches off the floor.

If you have large, heavy speakers, then this is not feasible. But for mid-size speakers, it might work. 30 years ago, it worked for a modest subwoofer.
 

Cahudson42

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#14
Unfortunatly, headphones- other than moving- are the most practical solution.

Since you are not a 'headphone type' - I suggest an AKG N90Q 'all in one' - when they go back on sale at $299 . (List $1499). These have an excellent 'crossfeed' capability, which simulates stereo speaker sound very well..

Any chance the $5k speakers can be returned?

For $80 premium, immediately available on Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B019MA5SGE/

Seriously, worth a try. You can always return them..
 
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I
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Thread Starter #15
Unfortunatly, headphones- other than moving- are the most practical solution.

Since you are not a 'headphone type' - I suggest an AKG N90Q 'all in one' - when they go back on sale at $299 . (List $1499). These have an excellent 'crossfeed' capability, which simulates stereo speaker sound very well..

Any chance the $5k speakers can be returned?
headphones are Witchery black magic, God forbid
 

sweetchaos

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#16
You need to cut the lower frequencies out...(example: below 10-30hz)

Here's a few ways:
1. MiniDSP and put a high pass filter at the lower frequencies
2. SVS's DSP, using a high pass filter, called "room mode compensation"
3. Arendal's DSP, using a high pass filter, called "subsonic filter"
4. If you have Denon or Marantz receiver (with Audyssey XT32), set "low frequency containment" (LFC) to ON, which (according to Gene from Audioholics) is basically a high pass filter at 35hz
 
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Robin L

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#18
headphones are Witchery black magic, God forbid
Headphones inject musical vibrations directly into the third eye.

And what are you saying here about black magic and witchery?

It's white magic and witchery.

Come to the dark side. We have cookies.
 

GD Fan

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#19
This approach worked for years - constant low level exposure with unexpected bursts of fervent activity at unlikely times (e.g. the Metallica Monday concert rebroadcasts) which generally concluded before 11pm. Add a dash of occasional late night floor shaking for good measure. With good luck they'll move out. But if you have bad luck like me they'll move into the apartment above you to exact their revenge!
 

oivavoi

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#20
What can I do to try to isolate the bass from the floor?
Short answer: Basically nothing. Most of the bass waves are transmitted from the air anyway, so decoupling the speakers from the floor will have a marginal effect at best.

Somewhat longer answer: What you may try is to use a DSP device which allows you to turn down the deepest bass, as has already been suggested. This is basically the only thing that will really work. You still get usable bass if you dial down the bass from about 60 hz. It also allows you to take down any big peaks in the bass that are caused by the room. Such peaks muddy the sound, so it's win-win.

Otherwise: Speak to your neighbor, ask if there's any periods during the week when it's ok that you play bass-heavy music. Try to be nice. Might work. Been there, experienced that.
 

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