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Reference data and/or AI to up-convert compressed audio on streaming

drfrink24

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Bottom line; I hate compressed audio that comes with movies on all streaming platforms. But I also don't want to maintain/purchase a library of Blu-Rays that contain the uncompressed audio.

So, it got me thinking;

1. Could you maintain reference data that compares the compressed signal of a known source with the uncompressed data of the known source, to create an audio feed that corrects/upconverts the audio back to or near the original quality? Something very basic that is in similar concept is Accurate Rip, which many of us use to correct CD rips based on multiple bit for bit comparisons. Essentially this is very similar, but on compressed audio.

-or- (since perhaps this involves DRM/Copyright issues)

2. Could AI/Machine learning (think DLSS but for Audio) restore/correct the compressed audio to something that's closer to the uncompressed audio?
 

DVDdoug

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1. Could you maintain reference data that compares the compressed signal of a known source with the uncompressed data of the known source, to create an audio feed that corrects/upconverts the audio back to or near the original quality?
Theoretically, yes. Practically, no.

DTS-HD sort-of works that way... It has the regular lossy DTS part that you can play without the HD decoder, plus the difference-correction data. It doesn't take any less space than other lossless formats but it's compatible with the regular old DTS.

Something very basic that is in similar concept is Accurate Rip, which many of us use to correct CD rips based on multiple bit for bit comparisons.
The CueTools database contains the full-lossless copy and only the errors are corrected/replaced. It won't make MP3 lossless.
 
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drfrink24

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The CueTools database contains the full-lossless copy and only the errors are corrected/replaced. It won't make MP3 lossless.
So what if missing information due to lossy compression is considered an error to be corrected? Keep in mind I have zero practical understanding of how codecs and compression actually work (as you can surmise, I'm sure).
 

escksu

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Show me scientific evidence that it makes a difference? Studies have been done and people cant even differentiate mp3 and cd quality....

Btw, if you do check out how movies are made, you will realise that most of the sound is added during post production.
 
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drfrink24

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Show me scientific evidence that it makes a difference? Studies have been done and people cant even differentiate mp3 and cd quality....

Btw, if you do check out how movies are made, you will realise that most of the sound is added during post production.
I'm just talking about the compressed audio that Netflix, Amazon, HBO Max, etc.. streams with their content, not all compressed audio in general. A way to simulate this is if your AVR has a "night mode" you can enable. Also, perhaps there is something else I'm unaware of going on.. maybe they clip the dynamic range for other reasons.

Netflix, for example, streams 640 kbps audio for 5.1 surround. Which to put that in perspective, apparently the average for DTS-MA titles is 3.8 mbps, and True HD is 8.4 mbps. I'm not saying that higher bit rate is 100% always noticable, but the experience of watching a title on BR for True HD is noticably better than DD 5.1
 
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