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Hearing and hearing aid recommendations

ninox

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Sep 27, 2023
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I have a good audiologist. I am 55 and wear the most expensive behind the ear Phonaks. While it is life changing for eating out in restaurants or watching movies, I find wearing hearing aids annoying for playing my cello. I seem to hear things I shouldnt (like extra high pitched bow noise). My wife says my intonation is better when I wear them but I cant stand the scratchy noises. I took the cello and aids back to the audiologist who made a custom program for cello playing and strings in general but its not that great. I tend to take them out when at orchestral or chamber concerts. I was thinking about trying Widex but these things are so pricey.
 

audio_tony

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I am approaching my mid 60's and suffer from tinnitus and hearing loss, the loss being worst in my right ear.

One thing I will add, is that when I had a hearing test, the tinnitus made it incredibly difficult to discriminate the test tone as the frequency increased, which led to a response curve that simply did not match my actual hearing loss.

I have Siemens branded hearing aids (I'm in the UK) and these are 'open' (tinnitus sufferers are apparently given an ear pad that allows unamplified sounds to enter the ear) - however the net result is that the DSP in the hearing aids causes sound through the aids to lag behind 'normal' sounds by a fraction of a second, so for example when I'm in a car and there is a 'bong' from the dashboard warning system, I hear it twice.

My aids also have different settings for speech, music and television, however I find them utterly useless for music and TV.

At the time of getting the hearing aids, the audiologist told me I would notice a huge difference in social gatherings, and would better be able to discriminate voices.
The made no difference. It must however be said that even in my youth when my hearing was good, I struggled in noisy social situations, so I didn't really expect any change there.

I feel that once my hearing deteriorates to the point where music / TV has to be unacceptably loud, I will have to resort to wearing headphones.

On a final note - I've had the hearing aids for about 4 years now, but I very, very, rarely wear them.
 
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middlemarch

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Just thought I would update my journey so far. I finally had my hearing test yesterday at the local university medical center. It went very well and contrary to my expectations I only have mild to moderate hearing loss, with my left being some 10 to 20dB worse than the right at the higher frequencies. I don't believe we went past around 8KHz.

After telling the audiologist what my wishes were, not just speech clarity but also improvements in listening to music, she recommended the Widex, and I selected the top of the line one (Moment?), based on the recommendations from the above commenters. I did not give her a list of preferred hearing aids, so I found it interesting, and comforting, that this recommendation was in concert with the majority of the respondents to this thread. More data points is always good, especially when they seem to align.

So, now the wait until they arrive and we get fitted and adjusted, which should occur the end of November.
 

audio_tony

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Ninjastar

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Oct 13, 2021
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I am approaching my mid 60's and suffer from tinnitus and hearing loss, the loss being worst in my right ear.

One thing I will add, is that when I had a hearing test, the tinnitus made it incredibly difficult to discriminate the test tone as the frequency increased, which led to a response curve that simply did not match my actual hearing loss.

I have Siemens branded hearing aids (I'm in the UK) and these are 'open' (tinnitus sufferers are apparently given an ear pad that allows unamplified sounds to enter the ear) - however the net result is that the DSP in the hearing aids causes sound through the aids to lag behind 'normal' sounds by a fraction of a second, so for example when I'm in a car and there is a 'bong' from the dashboard warning system, I hear it twice.

My aids also have different settings for speech, music and television, however I find them utterly useless for music and TV.

At the time of getting the hearing aids, the audiologist told me I would notice a huge difference in social gatherings, and would better be able to discriminate voices.
The made no difference. It must however be said that even in my youth when my hearing was good, I struggled in noisy social situations, so I didn't really expect any change there.

I feel that once my hearing deteriorates to the point where music / TV has to be unacceptably loud, I will have to resort to wearing headphones.

On a final note - I've had the hearing aids for about 4 years now, but I very, very, rarely wear them.
There are a few things to unpack here, many of which I cannot determine with certainty since I am not your hearing care provider.

But with regards to your test, if you feel your tinnitus made it difficult to obtain reliable results, make sure that your provider is using pulsed presentation tones instead of continuous tones, which are difficult to discern from the tinnitus.

The open domes on your hearing aids are used if you have normal low frequency hearing. If you do not have normal low frequency hearing, your provider can use more occluded domes on your devices to better match the gain prescribed for your specific hearing loss. A modern hearing aid should not be so delayed in response that you could hear two distinct "bong" sounds coming from a single "bong". It sounds like a fit issue either how it's physically coupled to your ear or how it's been programmed, hard to say.

The different programs in your devices like those for crowds, music, TV are based on your initial program. But if you have not been seen by your provider and tested recently, it's possible your main program is not meeting your prescription targets because your hearing may have changed or the devices are simply not working correctly. Music is tough and many patients will not be happy with the sound quality/timbre of instruments through their devices, which are prioritized for understanding speech. The best way to understand television is to connect your devices to a TV streamer that is compatible with your hearing aids. This puts the sound directly into your hearing aids similar to wearing headphones. Without a streamer, there are too many variables for the hearing aid to combat like room acoustics, the quality of sound coming from your TV speakers, poor mixing of the dialogue on a movie, etc.

I'm sorry you haven't felt enough benefit with your hearing devices to want to wear them regularly.

A hearing aid is only as good as how it's been fit. Make sure that whoever is fitting your devices is following best practices. If you want to learn more about that, there is an audiologist on YouTube named Dr. Cliff Olson who describes best practices. If you are wanting more out of your hearing care experience, make sure they follow these practices. Unfortunately not everyone licensed to fit hearing aids does.
 
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middlemarch

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Interesting hearing someone from the UK say they have more loss in the right ear. My audiologist told me one of the main reasons folks in the US have more loss in the left ear comes from driving with the car window down in the pre Aircon era. Especially prominent in long distance truck drivers. It would be very interesting if the same occurs in the right ear in folks who drive on the other side of the road. And here I was blaming it all on my headphone listening...
 

audio_tony

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Interesting hearing someone from the UK say they have more loss in the right ear. My audiologist told me one of the main reasons folks in the US have more loss in the left ear comes from driving with the car window down in the pre Aircon era. Especially prominent in long distance truck drivers. It would be very interesting if the same occurs in the right ear in folks who drive on the other side of the road. And here I was blaming it all on my headphone listening...
I grew up in South Africa, where I was a TV serviceman on the road for several years. No in car air conditioning led to me having to drive with the window down for most of the time, with the consequent buffering to my right ear.

I am convinced this is largely responsible for my hearing loss in that ear. The hearing loss in my left ear is just all part of ageing.

I am a very infrequent user of headphones, and always have been, apart from a few years in my teens - and even then, I was acutely aware of hearing damage so the volume was always kept low.
 

egellings

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Feb 6, 2020
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Are there any hearing aids that can also be used as IEMs?
I have used one of the off-the-shelf Etymotic models to good effect. I think it was their ER-43. This is not a prescription model and is billed as a personal amplification device, not a hearing aid, likely done to prevent legal issues.
 

RenPa

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Dec 7, 2022
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I also recommand Widex moment but remember that you must put it every day and it may take 6-10 months before toget use to it.
 
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