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Can speaker's transient response be improved with a better amplifier?

SIY

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This is me maybe abusing the English language a bit - what I mean is that I would like to have the snare drum show some kind of "bite" and the clang in the piano should be clear and sharp.
This one screams "EQ!"
 

gnarly

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@OP
Sounds like you have a really good neighbor, for the loan of the speakers.
Maybe the neighbor will help you further...loan you components as well, until the sound clicks into place (or doesn't) ...???
 

DVDdoug

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Scientifically/mathematically, "transient response" is related to frequency response.

I suspect you are hearing something else and interpreting it as transient response.

I dunno... Maybe your neighbor's setup is just louder.... The 1st requirement of an A/B (or ABX) test is to be volume matched. And or for dynamics, you need headroom.

For me, it's usually the dynamics (in the particular recording) that really make a snare or cymbal., etc., "jump out". And that makes me want to turn it up!
 
OP
igufi

igufi

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@OP
Sounds like you have a really good neighbor, for the loan of the speakers.
Maybe the neighbor will help you further...loan you components as well, until the sound clicks into place (or doesn't) ...???
The av-amp maybe, the subwoofer is probably too much.

The sub is also a bit of a black horse: maybe the AV amp does a better job in integrating it to the speakers in my neighbor’s room and that contributes to the sound. My Elac should do ok but my pre-amp may have a poor implementation of the x-over to sub. I could test routing the main speaker cables via the sub and rely on the sub’s x-over implementation instead. I’d lose the .1 channel info in multichannel material :-/
 

Propheticus

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Just to check on a hunch: did your neighbour set up Audyssey / enable dynamic EQ on his Denon AVR?
It could be you need some EQ to fix your in-rooms (bass) response. Increasing overall bass level, but getting rid of peaks. Typical domestic room sizes often cause mid bass modes 'muddying' the sound.
 

FeddyLost

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Is it possible that the amplifier is not up to the task and the spikes caused by the transients get "rounded up"? I could try and get something like the Audiophonics LPA-S400ET or IOM 500 Stereo to drive the main channels. Otherwise it looks like I have to replace both the amps and the speakers to get the improvements I'm looking for
Yes, in principle some amplifiers can't work very well with transients at real load.
But in your case I'd check if room correction was applied and maybe checked FR with microphone. Typical untreated room "muddiness" hides a lot of details and DRC clears it up.
IMO cheap Denon AVR with demanding load like R3 is not the example of perfect synergy between amp and speakers in classic "amp + speakers" understanding.
I'd loan his Denon or any AVR of comparable level because DRC really can change FR dramatically.

Before applying good DRC I'd not suspect your other hardware because amps in Denon for 600$ is not either Purifi not Parasound Halo.
 
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