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Yamaha R-S202 Receiver Review

Rate this stereo receiver:

  • 1. Poor (headless panther)

    Votes: 13 4.0%
  • 2. Not terrible (postman panther)

    Votes: 126 38.5%
  • 3. Fine (happy panther)

    Votes: 147 45.0%
  • 4. Great (golfing panther)

    Votes: 41 12.5%

  • Total voters
    327
A gentle reminder;
JSmith
I really appreciate this. I didn't realize that term had negative connotations. Thanks for letting me know. I re-worded those posts to remove it.
 
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The Loxjie A40 seems to be pretty attractive too, I could be tempted but hesitating. For roughly the same price, it's neater, smaller than this Yam, it has even more functionnalities than the Yam - it adds a phono input (don't know if it's good or just an added feature for following the vinyl trend), plus some basic EQs that can arguably replace the variable loudness of the Yam.

BUT (there are always buts !) : as for reliability, I don't know if it matches the Yam. And not sure service for repair can be easily found for these chinese brands in case of problem.

And also, the Yam is completely load independant, thanks to its long established schematic of class AB implementation. The Infineon class D module used in the Loxjie or other SMLS amps is rather good but not "post-filter feedback -PFFB". For a full range amp, it can cause some problems in the treble, depending on the speaker you use, of course. Used in a bi or tri amped speaker, the Infineon module works fine, but for an integrated full range amp, i'm not sure it's an universal solution.

All in all, the Yam may be a more "comforting" buy : brand reputation, service and reliability, classic looks, no problem in treble range.
Load dependency in the

https://www.audiosciencereview.com/forum/index.php?threads/loxjie-a30-amplifier-review.17547/

Loxjie A30 is much better than the other Class D amps and the A40 hasn't been tested yet so that's just a guessing game. It's hard for me to imagine Loxjie messing up the class D implementation in their new model compared to their old model tho. That's why I'm hoping it gets reviewed sooner than later. Also the LDAC support is really neat, along with the Sub out.
 
Load dependency in the

https://www.audiosciencereview.com/forum/index.php?threads/loxjie-a30-amplifier-review.17547/

Loxjie A30 is much better than the other Class D amps and the A40 hasn't been tested yet so that's just a guessing game. It's hard for me to imagine Loxjie messing up the class D implementation in their new model compared to their old model tho. That's why I'm hoping it gets reviewed sooner than later. Also the LDAC support is really neat, along with the Sub out.
Loxjie A30 compared to Yamaha R-S202. I'm just saying, check the difference in power. They play in different leagues:

Loxjie A30: 40 watts into 4 Ohms, 18 watts into 8 Ohms (with a 24 volt, 6.75 amp PSU).
Yamaha R-S202: 137 watts into 4 Ohms, 104 watts into 8 Ohms.

Plus the Yamaha is a class AB amp so even a bit more dynamic power. According to Yamaha:
Dynamic power (8/6/4/2 ohms)- 125 W / 150 W / 165 W / 180 W

 
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I have a Yamaha RXv385. Is the amplifier section similar to this one?
 
I own a Yamaha A-S301. I used it for a few month years ago, and then moved to class D amps (in part, thanks to ASR). Since then it has been sitting on a shelf, to the chagrin of my wife. It never gave me the same involving experience when listening to Classical Music from CDs and FLAC files. Looking at the measurements of its less expensive brother, I am not surprised. It is a 100% personal subjective observation. However, when I dedicate my finite time to listening, it makes me happy to know I am closer to impeccable reproduction of the source with my system now than I was a few years ago.
I agree with your wife. Cmon man, just get rid of it if you’re not using it
 
I get this is mostly a low priced alternative to older vintage run of the mill receivers, that older guys might tend to want, but its missing one huge feature,
That most of my friends that fit this category tend to use/like

No "loudness" compensation button can be seen??

Although I tend to not use this feature, as I am sure most of us would not, I find that the typical buyer that just want to rock out to classic rock, almost always uses this. In fact its almost necessary with a lot of older rock, to give it some deep bass body to the sound.
Not in our UK fraternity they didn't. Yamaha used to have a variable loudness control and I bet most owners of such equipped products sneakily used it :D
 
Loxjie A30 compared to Yamaha R-S202. I'm just saying, check the difference in power. They play in different leagues:

Loxjie A30: 40 watts into 4 Ohms, 18 watts into 8 Ohms (with a 24 volt, 6.75 amp PSU).
Yamaha R-S202: 137 watts into 4 Ohms, 104 watts into 8 Ohms.

Plus the Yamaha is a class AB amp so even a bit more dynamic power. According to Yamaha:
Dynamic power (8/6/4/2 ohms)- 125 W / 150 W / 165 W / 180 W

@snuf and Daniel, I wasn't talking about the Loxjie A30 (a tiny budget amp quite in a different league, I'm not interested in) but about the Loxjie A40, much more versatile and powerful (not tested yet indeed) which can be compared to the Yamaha.

The fact is these 2 Loxjies are load dependent, it's visible in ASR measurements for the A30, though this isn't catastrophic. So you can't tell Loxjie are better than other class D amps. they're far from Ncore or Purifi league, and even rather far from Icepower or TI 3255 well implemented.

I don't mean they're bad amps, in fact they're pretty good budget amps specs wise, but do not expect state of the art class D for this price level. And I'm concerned about reliabilty and service. I owned and still own Yamaha products. Their reliability's perfect, the brand is well distributed and serviced everywhere in the world. Loxjie can't claim the same, maybe in ten years, but not now.
 
@Tovarich007 try to find second hand not used much Yamaha A-S700 if you can for about 250 $~€ if you need an power amplifier only (analog unbalanced inputs).
 
At $200, you won't lose much on resale years down the road.
That said, I picked up a used Yamaha Aventage AVR for $80 a few years ago for my parents. They pair it with Cambridge Audio bookshelves in the living room. Works great.

I too hate those spring clips.
 
Very cool. A Yamaha R-S201 was my first receiver/amplifier. I still have it, but it's been replaced by the Yamaha A-S501 in my setup.
 
As many buyers may use this Yamaha simply as a radio, it is a pity that the tuner section has not been tested.
I bought one of these from Goodwill's online site for about $30 (tax & shipping included) to use as a garage radio. I listen almost exclusively to a jazz & blues station whose transmitter is roughly 30 miles away with mountains in-between. Can't offer anything but my own experience, but for me the tuner section performed better than excepted in regards to getting clear reception of what has been a difficult station to get in my area. I've gotten better sounding results with dedicated tuner / amplifier combinations, but that's to be expected. Goodwill's online site appears to have a neverending supply of this Yamaha receiver, often for under $30. For that amount it's hard to beat for a garage / workshop radio.
 
Re: the speaker outputs, it used to be that Yamaha used these "push and grab" connectors on lower-end stuff, and binding posts on mid- to higher-end gear. See attached photo from my c. 1989 AX-500U integrated, similar if not identical to the binding posts used on my mid-'90s Arcam amps. Not ideal, but viable; especially if using banana plugs.
 

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I have one for around 3 years or so. Bought on sale for around $125 at the time. It's been rock solid. Remote quit after a little over a year (out of warranty) Yamaha sent me a new one for free with shipping included. Paired with NHT SuperOnes version II and a Polk DSW 440 pro in my MBR. Perfect for what I use it for.

Had the equivalent price Sony that I bought on sale for around the same price. Total POS, died just after a year and Sony CS was totally useless.

This stereo receiver is well worth its price.
 
I'd say it is amazing price point engineering - and a genuine upgrade from it may well be several times the price point considering built-in versatility. If I was 19 and in university I may well have looked into this and be very happy.
 
Is the "high noise" actually a problem? Can you hear any hum if you hook it up to speakers?
 
For $200, it does an entry-level job. The R&D in this product was likely amortized decades ago, so production costs can be low.

I voted “not terrible”. A reasonable product for a tight budget, but I personally outgrew this level of performance many years ago.
 
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