• WANTED: Happy members who like to discuss audio and other topics related to our interest. Desire to learn and share knowledge of science required. There are many reviews of audio hardware and expert members to help answer your questions. Click here to have your audio equipment measured for free!

Yamaha R-S202 Receiver Review

Rate this stereo receiver:

  • 1. Poor (headless panther)

    Votes: 13 4.0%
  • 2. Not terrible (postman panther)

    Votes: 126 38.5%
  • 3. Fine (happy panther)

    Votes: 147 45.0%
  • 4. Great (golfing panther)

    Votes: 41 12.5%

  • Total voters
    327
Yeah, but how's the AM radio?

Glad it's not too bad, but I'm a bit disappointed in this amp, even so. Tiny class D amps like the Aiyima at $65 do better. Although that particular one has less power.
biggest disadvantage of cheap class d amps is frequency load dependency in treble. i want linear response
 
biggest disadvantage of cheap class d amps is frequency load dependency in treble. i want linear response
Exactly. I can't sleep at night unless I know my amp isn't doing any load dependency stuff. I have an MX3s in the system right now. I can't confirm whether it's load dependent or not, but seeing as how the PA3s from Topping isn't and it uses the same chip, I bet the MX3s is fine.
 
I think the low-end Yamaha is fine for power and features, but as for me, I like the little "just an amp" units from Fosi and Aiyima and I sure can not hear the modest amount of rise in treble with my speakers, especially since I only hear up to about 11.5khz now.

This Yamaha or other low-cost integrated amps nicely solve the problem for those of us needing multiple inputs/full preamp functions, for which, thus far, the Chinese makers have not delivered a product.
 
Last edited:
I really don't see much advantage to these low cost class D amps over what's in this Yamaha. I'd pretty much guarantee the benefits of the class D are inaudible in MOST cases. I do see the potential drawbacks though and those should be far more audible in most cases. Orders of magnitude in fact. Now the small changes in FR may be a positive or a negative and possibly even null or equivalent preference-wise. Taken one variable out of the equation can simplify things, but if you are going to EQ the response anyway, what's the difference? Advantage cheap Class D. If you want a radio tuner: aventage ;) Yamaha.
 
I really don't see much advantage to these low cost class D amps over what's in this Yamaha. I'd pretty much guarantee the benefits of the class D are inaudible in MOST cases. I do see the potential drawbacks though and those should be far more audible in most cases. Orders of magnitude in fact. Now the small changes in FR may be a positive or a negative and possibly even null or equivalent preference-wise. Taken one variable out of the equation can simplify things, but if you are going to EQ the response anyway, what's the difference? Advantage cheap Class D. If you want a radio tuner: aventage ;) Yamaha.
It depends on which "cheap" class D amps you are talking about really. Is it load dependent? I'm out if it is. Does it have an analog volume pot? I'm also out. I crave perfect channel balance these days (I don't like to turn my amps up too high so when I'm down low in volume I like knowing that everything is balanced). The Topping MX3s is pretty competitive with this Yamaha. The Topping has a remote, built in DAC, great headphone amp, updated bluetooth, sub-out, and a very nice display. This thing goes very loud and stays clean with my speakers. According to the Topping graphs the MX3s is clean @ ~ 40w 4 ohm and 25w 8 ohm. The Yamaha has about 4x the power though, whether you need that or not is up to you, I don't seem to. The one thing that I don't care for with this Yamaha would be the spring-clip terminals. Also it uses about 30w just sitting there, while the MX3s just uses 3w, so if you care about efficiency there's that.
 
Last edited:
Size and power efficiency are to me, compelling factors. And simplicity of operation.

Tone controls are still a good thing. Many of us use them rarely, but they still have a place, or a loudness contour for low level listening. If one is going to get a higher level integrated amp, nice to get one where the center position effectively takes them out of the circuit ("tone defeat"). Of course, some of the Fosi/Aiyima/SMSL offerings have either physical or digital tone control.

A simple receiver or integrated can give a cleaner "all in one" appearance if one is using multiple sources and inputs. The power bricks with these smaller amps is not my favorite thing, for sure.

This 202 receiver does not have a phono circuit, which for me would be a stopper, I would still advise newbies to jump up to a 301 or 501 Yamaha if starting out...unless you really, really want an FM tuner (?!?!)...
 
You don't get the features with a Class D amp in that price region and that is why you buy an amp like this one, not because it's AB or D.
 
If I could get all the features of this receiver at this price but with a class D amp, I’d buy the class D version. I actually didn’t want a phono pre built in because I own 2 that are very nice ones to begin with.
 
Always wanted to see these tested but the mid-range and the top shelf ones too to see if they behave about the same.
 
I have the predecessor to this receiver, the R-S201. I'm pretty sure that the only difference between the two is that the R-S202 adds bluetooth. They look identical otherwise. My R-S201 is ten years old. My wife bought it in 2014 when we were just dating. When we had our first apartment we were hipsters and decided not to buy a TV. Instead we set this receiver up with my Technics turntable and (at the time) Pioneer BS22's. Now, it lives in my home office. I have a turntable, an old school iPhone dock, and two computers plugged into it. I also use FM quite a bit. I find the headphone output surprisingly decent with higher impedance headphones. As a result I've put my old Headroom Micro Amp away for the time being. It's driving Sony SC SS5's and doesn't miss a beat. Turns on, sounds great, and still logs at least 16 hours a week (not counting evenings like tonight). The only misstep started about a year ago. The front control panel buttons are controlling functions other than what they're labeled for. For example, the input toggle switches will instead adjust the bass or the balance randomly. Luckily, every function is on the remote, so I never have to reach over and actually touch the receiver.

It's nice to be able to report that after a decade, something so cheap more or less works just as it did the day it came out of the box. My only advice is to just keep track of your remotes. I ended up needing mine.

IMG_5594.jpeg
 
Back
Top Bottom