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Why do records sound so much better than digital?

Don Hills

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You certainly can hear pre-ringing. Look for tracks that start with a very loud transient and there will be slight noise just a poofteenth of a second before the music starts. But within the music, I struggle to hear it / or I can't hear it at all. But knowing that it is there somehow bothers me :p:p:p
Given your preferred technology you appear to be referring to pre-echo, which of course is real and audible.
I can understand your being bothered by things that you know are there but can't hear. Years ago when someone would argue that records sounded better than CDs I would play a 1 KHz tone from a test record. Ignoring the occasional crackle and pop, I would point out the subtle loudness variations and slight "breathiness" etc, even when the turntable setup was high end. I would then play the same track off a test CD, and the improvement in steadiness and purity was not subtle. The defects in the record playback were of course masked by the transient nature of actual music, except maybe for solo piano music, but I pointed out that the defects were still there even if inaudible. This somehow bothered some people. :)
 

JP

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Let me guess - someone didn’t read past page 2 and responded to the OP? Sal and Newman stop by yet? It’s good to give them something to do :)
 

Holmz

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That is an authentic technical term ... (poofteenth) - should be universal!! :)

I used the commonwealth sister acronym SFA acronyms three weeks ago… And spelling out was not very appreciated.

I have never poofteeth outside of the commonwealth…
Guess #2 … Canada?
 

Robin L

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Why anyone would keep replying to a topic with such an obvious troll title is beyond me. But I am sure you'll collectively agree and prove the fallacy. :)
I'd venture it's due to the obvious revival of interest in the format. I can no longer stand the sound of LPs, the "tells" of the format are much too obvious to these ears. But everybody seems to be in a rush to get into the game, with Technics re-introducing their famous DJ 'tables and Thorens getting back in the game. It's clear that this is not just a fad. The current situation all makes it clear that "the closest approach to the original sound" is not the point. If one wants "straight wire with gain" there's digital recordings and digital amps. But it looks like a whole lot of people are seeking something else.
 

Galliardist

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I'd venture it's due to the obvious revival of interest in the format. I can no longer stand the sound of LPs, the "tells" of the format are much too obvious to these ears. But everybody seems to be in a rush to get into the game, with Technics re-introducing their famous DJ 'tables and Thorens getting back in the game. It's clear that this is not just a fad. The current situation all makes it clear that "the closest approach to the original sound" is not the point. If one wants "straight wire with gain" there's digital recordings and digital amps. But it looks like a whole lot of people are seeking something else.
I don't think Thorens ever got out of "the game”.
Every few years someone seems to come along and invest in them, there are a couple of new turntables released, and then we don’t hear from them for a bit.
 

Keith_W

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Oi bruss - what part of Australia are at? :)

I'm in Melbourne mate. Pretty grouse down here.

I'd venture it's due to the obvious revival of interest in the format. I can no longer stand the sound of LPs, the "tells" of the format are much too obvious to these ears. But everybody seems to be in a rush to get into the game, with Technics re-introducing their famous DJ 'tables and Thorens getting back in the game. It's clear that this is not just a fad. The current situation all makes it clear that "the closest approach to the original sound" is not the point. If one wants "straight wire with gain" there's digital recordings and digital amps. But it looks like a whole lot of people are seeking something else.

I don't think "straight wire with gain" across the entire system is a good idea. As I previously mentioned, the room and speakers will mess it up. My individual components are as linear as possible and (hopefully!) approach the "straight wire with gain" ideal, but then I apply DSP to correct the speaker/room or apply salt and pepper for personal taste.
 

earlevel

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You certainly can hear pre-ringing. Look for tracks that start with a very loud transient and there will be slight noise just a poofteenth of a second before the music starts. But within the music, I struggle to hear it / or I can't hear it at all. But knowing that it is there somehow bothers me :p:p:p
Funny, I was going to hypothesize that that particular scenario was the most likely to be hearable. It reminds me of the days of tape, when sometimes they would not be stored tails out, and you'd hear a pre-echo on some albums, especially when a song started hard.
 

MattHooper

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I'm just here to figure out why records sound so much better than digital.

Anyone have any ideas? We need to talk about this.
 

JP

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Digital1955

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I'm just here to figure out why records sound so much better than digital.

Anyone have any ideas? We need to talk about this.

Much like many native American tribes believe that a photograph steals part of the soul of whoever is in the photo, I believe analog recordings also steal some of the soul of the person(s) being recorded. Each time you play an analog record, you are releasing a bit of that soul back into the air. You just don't get that part with digital.
 

DonR

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Much like many native American tribes believe that a photograph steals part of the soul of whoever is in the photo, I believe analog recordings also steal some of the soul of the person(s) being recorded. Each time you play an analog record, you are releasing a bit of that soul back into the air. You just don't get that part with digital.
And each time you play it, there is a little less soul in the record to release.
 

MattHooper

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Much like many native American tribes believe that a photograph steals part of the soul of whoever is in the photo, I believe analog recordings also steal some of the soul of the person(s) being recorded. Each time you play an analog record, you are releasing a bit of that soul back into the air. You just don't get that part with digital.

Indeed, a lot of souls released in to the air when I play records. My wife think's it's just mold. I find a spray of air freshener can do wonders to keep domestic harmony while communing with the souls.
 
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