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Where to get guidance for soundproofing a basement

Stbby

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I’m aiming to soundproof the ceiling of my 1300 sq ft open floor plan basement without covering up the ceiling joists, as adding drywall in the standard way reduces the ceiling height too much and makes the space feel super claustrophobic.

My understanding from one soundproofing contractor is that if I cut two sheets of 5/8 drywall to fit between the joists and do a green glue sandwich, I should be able to get a good reduction in noise transfer.

What I’m a lot less clear on are all the edge cases: what are my options when there’s HVAC stuff in the between-joist spaces? What are my options for the area around the one room that DOES have a drywall ceiling, the bathroom? Are there soundproofing professionals (or experienced DIYers) I could hire just to help give me detailed guidance on all those edge cases? I’m thinking of spending the next month or two doing this project mostly full time and I don’t want to make huge mistakes via ignorance.
Thoughts on how to get the right information/guidance?
 

NiagaraPete

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I’m aiming to soundproof the ceiling of my 1300 sq ft open floor plan basement without covering up the ceiling joists, as adding drywall in the standard way reduces the ceiling height too much and makes the space feel super claustrophobic.

My understanding from one soundproofing contractor is that if I cut two sheets of 5/8 drywall to fit between the joists and do a green glue sandwich, I should be able to get a good reduction in noise transfer.

What I’m a lot less clear on are all the edge cases: what are my options when there’s HVAC stuff in the between-joist spaces? What are my options for the area around the one room that DOES have a drywall ceiling, the bathroom? Are there soundproofing professionals (or experienced DIYers) I could hire just to help give me detailed guidance on all those edge cases? I’m thinking of spending the next month or two doing this project mostly full time and I don’t want to make huge mistakes via ignorance.
Thoughts on how to get the right information/guidance?
I'm getting ready to do the same thing. I do have ceiling height so I can go with 5/8" drywall. I'm wondering if I should use some type of batting in between joists.
 

NTK

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You can find Dr Floyd Toole's presentation on sound isolation for home theaters here:
 

Doodski

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We soundproofed a rec room and a ping pong room underneath a bedroom. We used 5/8 gyproc with donnacona sheet underneath for sound deadening. It worked well.
 

alex-z

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Low frequency isolation = decoupling. Staggered studs, hat channel, isolation mounts for floor/ceiling.

Mid frequency isolation = insulation. Mineral wool, fibreglass, or recycled denim.

High frequency isolation = stiff mass. Drywall, plywood, brick, etc.

If you want to full isolate a room, you need to combine all 3 approaches. When I do home theatre consulting, people have frequently received mediocre advice from contractors who misunderstand their needs. A 5/8" drywall sandwich with green glue is excellent for mid and high frequency isolation, someone could be singing at the top of their lungs in the next room and not bother you. This is reflected in the high STC rating, which is all that many people reference.

However, this approach is poor for isolating mid-bass and below. Someone turns on EDM music or an action movie, person in the next room might as well be sitting with you.
 
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