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What you need to know about the virus in China "2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)"

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sejarzo

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Getting personal for me, as I assume it is for others...my post to Facebook from Wednesday:


Got a call from the senior facility where my 91 and 90 year old parents live this morning. My dad had a mild fever and headache last night, resolved with Tylenol, but seemed to have some mild congestion...so he's on 14 day isolation, and the state board of health was arriving this afternoon to swab him for COVID, chest x-rays for him and some other residents, etc. Result was phone tag for me for hour trying to line up MD orders for the testing because his geriatrician's office is closed due to COVID concerns.

After she described my dad's situation,the director revealed something more ominous. Two residents in the memory care unit where my mom now lives tested COVID positive in the past week. The facility has been closed to outside visitors since March 17, and the on-site independent/assisted living dining rooms, exercise room/PT gym, salon, etc. also closed. All independent and assisted residents have been eating in their units since then. Everybody on the site has their temperature taken three times per day, along with being evaluated by a nurse/aide.

The memory care folks must eat in a common area, as the rooms are very small and most residents have no room for a table. They also have many residents who need assistance with eating, and in the case of my mom, the staff has to directly interact with her all the time as she is confined to her wheelchair, and needs assistance with bathing, dressing, etc. etc. There is going to be frequent contact day in, day out and those folks cannot self-isolate.

I was able to talk to my dad this afternoon, and he says he pretty much feels fine, no fever, perhaps a mild headache, and maybe a bit of congestion.
My take is that there was little else the facility could have done. It is managed by a firm that handles quite a few senior sites throughout the country, and they are being advised by experts in how to respond. Still, it's clear that this virus is being shed by asymptomatic people, and they obviously cannot sequester staff on site for the duration.

So we wait and see. My dad's results should be available Friday, when we also expect my mom's biopsy results from an obvious carcinoma on her arm. I wonder how soon it will be possible to get her out of the facility to get that tumor removed...she is not likely to leave there without my dad, who normally accompanies her on the facility's transport.
 

MarcT

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Getting personal for me, as I assume it is for others...my post to Facebook from Wednesday:


Got a call from the senior facility where my 91 and 90 year old parents live this morning. My dad had a mild fever and headache last night, resolved with Tylenol, but seemed to have some mild congestion...so he's on 14 day isolation, and the state board of health was arriving this afternoon to swab him for COVID, chest x-rays for him and some other residents, etc. Result was phone tag for me for hour trying to line up MD orders for the testing because his geriatrician's office is closed due to COVID concerns.

After she described my dad's situation,the director revealed something more ominous. Two residents in the memory care unit where my mom now lives tested COVID positive in the past week. The facility has been closed to outside visitors since March 17, and the on-site independent/assisted living dining rooms, exercise room/PT gym, salon, etc. also closed. All independent and assisted residents have been eating in their units since then. Everybody on the site has their temperature taken three times per day, along with being evaluated by a nurse/aide.

The memory care folks must eat in a common area, as the rooms are very small and most residents have no room for a table. They also have many residents who need assistance with eating, and in the case of my mom, the staff has to directly interact with her all the time as she is confined to her wheelchair, and needs assistance with bathing, dressing, etc. etc. There is going to be frequent contact day in, day out and those folks cannot self-isolate.

I was able to talk to my dad this afternoon, and he says he pretty much feels fine, no fever, perhaps a mild headache, and maybe a bit of congestion.
My take is that there was little else the facility could have done. It is managed by a firm that handles quite a few senior sites throughout the country, and they are being advised by experts in how to respond. Still, it's clear that this virus is being shed by asymptomatic people, and they obviously cannot sequester staff on site for the duration.

So we wait and see. My dad's results should be available Friday, when we also expect my mom's biopsy results from an obvious carcinoma on her arm. I wonder how soon it will be possible to get her out of the facility to get that tumor removed...she is not likely to leave there without my dad, who normally accompanies her on the facility's transport.
Best wishes for recovery for your mom and dad. My dad was in a memory care center for a couple years, so I understand that there is little, if any, way to prevent close human contact for people who need assistance in eating, bathing, etc.
 

Zog

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But Australia and New Zealand seem to have fairly reliable data from extensive tests.
The testing is slow - a nurse friend caught the common cold, had to isolate to her own bedroom within her family and had to wait three days for the test result.
We have over 1200 confirmed cases with one death. We have been in lockdown some three weeks. As of yesterday every person arriving in the country is being put in mandatory quarantine for 14 days.
 

StevenEleven

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The testing is slow - a nurse friend caught the common cold, had to isolate to her own bedroom within her family and had to wait three days for the test result.
We have over 1200 confirmed cases with one death. We have been in lockdown some three weeks. As of yesterday every person arriving in the country is being put in mandatory quarantine for 14 days.
If you are from New Zealand I saw your prime minister address your country live (I was watching TV, I wasn’t there), I guess it was two or three weeks ago. I was very impressed with how informed and articulate she seemed and how seriously she was addressing the problem. Apparently it’s paying off. She was also easy on the eyes. ;)
 

gikigill

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My wife has been making masks from old duvet covers and blue Jeans. An internal pocket holds a panel of HEPA material cut from vacuum cleaner bags. I bought this particle counter to test effectiveness.

Here a pic of a baseline measurement in our dining room. I used a kitchen funnel over the collection pipe in order to have a surface onto which to mount the mask.
View attachment 57894
So for the submicron level you see a count of 25000 units per liter.

Here is with the mask:



View attachment 57895
Now we're down to 4742, an 81% reduction. Not too shabby for a DIY. Notice the 2.5micron level dropped from 90 to 10 (88%).

Up next is my modded full face snorkle mask with a HEPA filter from aRoomba (not used of course, that would be gross!)
View attachment 57896

But my ultimate plan is to mod a Bain mask:
View attachment 57897
I think that will get me to the front of the line to get into Whole Foods...
You only shop at the Whole Foods, I was born in it, molded by it.
 

JIW

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Total number of deaths in Sweden per day in March 2020 & avg 2015-2019.

View attachment 57942
From the middle of march, the data can be viewed as trending upward from around 245 to 275 (something like 10-20 additional daily deaths per week). The big dips seem periodic and thus may be a reporting issue that is smoothed out by the averaging. The previous lower values may be due to factors resulting in death having lower activity (such as less traffic).

In the same time interval, the average of previous years suggests a slight downward trend (around 5 less daily deaths per week) and possibly a levelling off in the end of March.

Here is the number of registered deaths due to COVID19 according to the Swedish authorities.
Screenshot 2020-04-10 at 00.53.25.png

The graph you posted end on 1 April where the number of deaths is 41. The increase from the middle to the end of march gives something like 20 additional deaths per week and may thus explain the rise in total daily deaths.

Looking at the number of deaths after 1 April suggests that (all else equal) the number of total daily deaths should increase to around 300 between 3 April and 7 April. After that it should fall back to around 280.

Mind you, this is a simple visual inspection and a linear extrapolation and should thus be taken with a grain of salt.
 

RayDunzl

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Makes me think of Philip Glass.
 

amirm

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@amirm don't eat the broccoli your Mrs bought back from the market today !
Mrs bought all her Broccoli weeks ago! We have not been to a grocery store for some 3 weeks now. Her grocery list is a mile long so we have no choice but to battle the viruses and get some more fruit and vegetables. I am getting prepared though with this outfit:

 

LeftCoastTim

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Blumlein 88

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Sounds very promising given the low cost of these machines

Auburn engineers successfully convert CPAPs into ventilators

Seems like a CPAP manufacturer would work with Auburn to create a modified one that can be manufactured.
Watch the short video I posted in the thread recently as to why this isn't enough.

Besides everyone knows Auburn is a cow college. So it only makes sense they tested it on a goat. (sorry a cousin is a graduate of their veterinary program).
 

Thomas savage

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Mrs bought all her Broccoli weeks ago! We have not been to a grocery store for some 3 weeks now. Her grocery list is a mile long so we have no choice but to battle the viruses and get some more fruit and vegetables. I am getting prepared though with this outfit:

Not going to ask questions about what your holding in your right hand, suffice to say I'm happy your still enjoying yourselves in the autumn of your years .

I'm tempted to ask whether your a zip or velcro man but I probably shouldn't..
 

maty

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http://aquas.gencat.cat/.content/In...Taxes-estandarditzades-edat-i-sexe/atlas.html

View attachment 57948

Tarragona 7 - Sant Salvador is now the worst. 503 positives cases / 100,000 inhabitants. Working class neighborhood, lots of immigration, tall buildings, small floors and great use of public transportation. Same variables as in other neighborhoods of Barcelona with a similar rate.

Access to the health system is the same for everyone. Now the public and private system are in the hands of the autonomous communities, for the State of Alarm in which we are.

With the passage of time the ranking has changed. Before Sant Salvador was not so bad. What has changed?

* Presumably, some of the workers have continued to go to work for basic essential services.

* The density of people in the flats is much higher and the rise in contagion has occurred during confinement. Other working neighborhoods have lower density in housing and they have not experienced that spectacular climb in positives.

In one day, Tarragona province: from 1,200 infected to 1,300 , too much now. The chemical industry continues to function as it is considered essential. I think those infections have occurred in homes for the most part.
 

Juhazi

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If you are from New Zealand I saw your prime minister address your country live (I was watching TV, I wasn’t there), I guess it was two or three weeks ago. I was very impressed with how informed and articulate she seemed and how seriously she was addressing the problem. Apparently it’s paying off. She was also easy on the eyes. ;)
Seriously!
kokuol hs.jpg

naispm.jpg
 

Dave Zan

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...had to wait three days for the test result.
Similar in Australia, a friend returned from an overseas conference and waited at least three days.
But at least we can test everyone required, apparently bodies aren't tested in parts of the US, and possibly other places.
Saves a test but loses data, I can't escape the suspicion that the reduction in the reported death toll is a contributory factor.

I already had Prime Minister envy with New Zealand.
Now you make it worse.

Best wishes
David
 
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