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What is on your workbench right now?

dfuller

Active Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2020
Messages
119
Likes
90
#81
Guitar amps, as per usual. Cheap Vox hybrid amp with a bad tremolo vactrol and potentially a bad output IC. What fun, huh?
 

RayDunzl

Major Contributor
Central Scrutinizer
Joined
Mar 9, 2016
Messages
9,537
Likes
7,718
Location
Riverview FL
#82
Motorcycle - tires, carbs, and petcock.
 

RayDunzl

Major Contributor
Central Scrutinizer
Joined
Mar 9, 2016
Messages
9,537
Likes
7,718
Location
Riverview FL
#84
Motorcycle - tires, carbs, and petcock.
Front tire change looks like a success.

Never changed a tubeless cycle tire before.

1596080501102.png


I got brave after watching this guy and getting the tools for the job.

(the local shop estimate might have had something to do with it too)
 
Joined
Jul 4, 2020
Messages
8
Likes
5
Location
Sweden
#86
Tiny space but lots of tools and instruments. The IO board of a NAD 3400 in for major
surgery. Noisy or non-functional swithches opened and cleaned. The contact elements
are hidden inside the plastic parts so no chance of proper cleaning from the outside.
New op-amps, relays and capacitors in the signal paths remain. It's my "spare" amplifier
so the main goal is to get it up and running again but no more than that. This model
is a rats nest of cables inside so the "fun factor" is limited.

Bench.jpg IO-pcb.jpg Switches.jpg
 

solderdude

Major Contributor
Joined
Jul 21, 2018
Messages
5,676
Likes
10,253
Location
The Neverlands
#88
The K712. Nothing like the fun PMA has... :confused:
 

restorer-john

Major Contributor
Joined
Mar 1, 2018
Messages
4,308
Likes
9,127
Location
Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
#91
A new higher powered simulated speaker dummy load.

View attachment 75983
I see you are using your new fine tip temperature controlled soldering iron... ;)


I have a story. A short one:

My father bought a soldering iron to solder some DIN speaker terminals in around 1974. He'd never soldered before but being a doctor, he figured it couldn't be too difficult- anyone should be able to do it. I remember looking at this brand new thing and being so jealous as I'd begged for a soldering iron for a while (I was about 7yo at the time). I wasn't allowed to go near it or touch it. It was "dangerous" apparently...

What frustrated me was, he tried to use it once and gave up, put it in its box with all the attachments up in the cupboard. It was teasing me.

He asked what I wanted for my birthday and I said the soldering iron. I guess he figured that was an easy gift- he had it already, so I got it. The rest is history but here is the soldering iron (scroll down):
























weller.jpeg


Never used the "cutting" tip, maybe melted a bit of plastic with the "smoothing" tip, but went through quite a few soldering tips. I taught myself to solder with that iron. Even fine PCB work on boards I made from scratch (my mum hated ferric chloride stains). Lost count of how often the pistol grip got so hot it would burn my palm. Several years later saved up enough to get a proper fine tip iron and the temp controlled ones came later.

It is still the goto iron for big cap terminals, star earth points or soldering metal shields- nothing else has the grunt of that thing.
 

SIY

Technical Expert
Technical Expert
Joined
Apr 6, 2018
Messages
4,627
Likes
9,176
Location
Phoenix, AZ
#93
View attachment 76073

Never used the "cutting" tip, maybe melted a bit of plastic with the "smoothing" tip, but went through quite a few soldering tips. I taught myself to solder with that iron. Even fine PCB work on boards I made from scratch (my mum hated ferric chloride stains). Lost count of how often the pistol grip got so hot it would burn my palm. Several years later saved up enough to get a proper fine tip iron and the temp controlled ones came later.

It is still the goto iron for big cap terminals, star earth points or soldering metal shields- nothing else has the grunt of that thing.
They're also great for terminals on big power resistors. I do have a temp controlled fine-tipped iron which... doesn't quite hack it for this.
 

March Audio

Major Contributor
Manufacturer
Joined
Mar 1, 2016
Messages
5,539
Likes
6,807
Location
Albany Western Australia
#94
I see you are using your new fine tip temperature controlled soldering iron... ;)


I have a story. A short one:

My father bought a soldering iron to solder some DIN speaker terminals in around 1974. He'd never soldered before but being a doctor, he figured it couldn't be too difficult- anyone should be able to do it. I remember looking at this brand new thing and being so jealous as I'd begged for a soldering iron for a while (I was about 7yo at the time). I wasn't allowed to go near it or touch it. It was "dangerous" apparently...

What frustrated me was, he tried to use it once and gave up, put it in its box with all the attachments up in the cupboard. It was teasing me.

He asked what I wanted for my birthday and I said the soldering iron. I guess he figured that was an easy gift- he had it already, so I got it. The rest is history but here is the soldering iron (scroll down):
























View attachment 76073

Never used the "cutting" tip, maybe melted a bit of plastic with the "smoothing" tip, but went through quite a few soldering tips. I taught myself to solder with that iron. Even fine PCB work on boards I made from scratch (my mum hated ferric chloride stains). Lost count of how often the pistol grip got so hot it would burn my palm. Several years later saved up enough to get a proper fine tip iron and the temp controlled ones came later.

It is still the goto iron for big cap terminals, star earth points or soldering metal shields- nothing else has the grunt of that thing.
OMG same experience with ferric chloride trying to make pcbs. Yellowy brown fingers. ;) Sodium hydroxide (ooh whats that tingly burning sensation) involved somewhere from memory.
 
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