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The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

yavormoskov

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Great movie and even better book. Watch us from above and laugh, Mr. Adams. Cheers
 

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JeffS7444

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I've spent way too much time with HHGG, from the books, the BBC radio drama (including newer installments), as well as the BBC TV series. I sorta liked the movie, kudos to the creators for condensing such rambling source material into a comprehensible feature-length movie, without losing the spirit of the thing.

It was some time before I realized that Ford Prefect was the name of an automobile, or that zebra crossings had nothing to do with Africa's charismatic megafauna.
 

Sir Sanders Zingmore

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Check out the 80s TV show. Much better than the movie, imo. The animation for the Guide very well done in comparison.
Completely agree. The movie (IMHO) didn’t even come close.
The books of course, are the best.
Vale Douglas Adams, a great mind who is sorely missed.
 

polmuaddib

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There will never be a movie that does justice to books, but the 2005 version at least got the feel, some humor and emotion of the book. It wasn't great but I'd watch a sequel.
In fact, it was announced, but Adams, unfortunately, died.
But, the way the things are going they might make a TV show out of it....
 
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yavormoskov

yavormoskov

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There will never be a movie that does justice to books, but the 2005 version at least got the feel, some humor and emotion of the book. It wasn't great but I'd watch a sequel.
In fact, it was announced, but Adams, unfortunately, died.
But, the way the things are going they might make a TV show out of it....
Not a TV series....please, no. The Foundation TV show left a bitter taste in the mouth. Isaac Asimov would turn in his grave if he saw it. I don't want this to happen to the The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.
 

polmuaddib

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The Foundation TV show left a bitter taste in the mouth
Sorry to hear that. I never got around to reading Foundation, but I might in future.
That is probably why I liked the show. Or could be that my standards are low...

Anyway, it is clear that nowadays, the feature film medium is dead and TV, it's murderer, is the number one medium.
And you are suppose to binge, not watch...

But not digress, and sad as our time is, I have accepted and enjoy whatever they give us and if someone were to make a THGTTG a TV, I would watch it.
 

JSmith

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The books of course, are the best.
Vale Douglas Adams, a great mind who is sorely missed.
Yep, agree completely... it's like my bible.

I never watched the movie, which is something I do when a book has a place in my heart... as I don't want the movie ruining my own imagination on what I thought the characters and places looked like in my own mind.


JSmith
 

simbloke

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The old TV show was my intro, then I read all the books. Not really a fan of the film at all.

Hope they don't make a new TV series anytime soon give the dross that Hollywood churns out these days.
 

JeffS7444

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It seems I've missed something: I hadn't known of an additional not-by-Adams book (And Another Thing) and radio drama series (Hexagonal Phase), which attempts to re-conclude the series on a less-bleak note. But I have to wonder whether Douglas Adams himself was thoroughly burnt-out by the whole thing and just wanted to move onto other things.
 

tomchris

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It has been a while since I have read alle th HHGTTG books:)
Last time was on the Nokia 9210 Communicator smartphone when that was around, believe it or not.
Nokia_9210.jpg


I have read all of Douglas Adams' books and played the Infocom HHGTTG text adventure and Starship Titanic game. I highly recommend buying"The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide" omnibus edition - collecting all the books into one. The Dirk Gently books are also great.

Just thinking about the Starship Titanic bomb brings a smile to my face.
 
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Presently42

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How do you know that?
Thought it was common knowledge. Anyway, you can read his own thoughts on Mostly Harmless in The Salmon of Doubt. I'm sure it's explicitly stated somewhere, that depression was the cause of the bleak year - go forth and search, if you're so inclined!
 

JSmith

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Ford got out his Sub-Etha Sens-O-Matic. It was making vague humming noises and a tiny light on it was flickering faintly.

"Flat battery?" said Arthur.

"No," said Ford, "there is a moving disturbance in the fabric of space-time, an eddy, a pool of instability, and it's somewhere in our vicinity."

"Where?"

Ford moved the device in a slow lightly bobbing semi-circle. Suddenly the light flashed.

"There!" said Ford, shooting out his arm. "There, behind that sofa!"

Arthur looked. Much to his surprise, there was a velvet paisley-covered Chesterfield sofa in the field in front of them. He boggled intelligently at it. Shrewd questions sprang into his mind.

"Why," he said, "is there a sofa in that field?"

"I told you!" shouted Ford, leaping to his feet. "Eddies in the space-time continuum!"

"And this is his sofa, is it?" asked Arthur, struggling to his feet and, he hoped, though not very optimistically, to his senses.

"Arthur!" shouted Ford at him, "that sofa is there because of the space-time instability I've been trying to get your terminally softened brain to get to grips with. It's been washed out of the continuum, it's space-time jetsam, it doesn't matter what it is, we've got to catch it, it's our only way out of here!"

He scrambled rapidly down the rocky outcrop and made off across the field.

"Catch it?" muttered Arthur, then frowned in bemusement as he saw that the Chesterfield was lazily bobbing and wafting away across the grass.

With a whoop of utterly unexpected delight he leapt down the rock and plunged off in hectic pursuit of Ford Prefect and the irrational piece of furniture.

They careered wildly through the grass, leaping, laughing, shouting instructions to each other to head the thing off this way or that way. The sun shone dreamily on the swaying grass, tiny field animals scattered crazily in their wake.

Arthur felt happy. He was terribly pleased that the day was for once working out so much according to plan. Only twenty minutes ago he had decided he would go mad, and now he was already chasing a Chesterfield sofa across the fields of prehistoric Earth.

The sofa bobbed this way and that and seemed simultaneously to be as solid as the trees as it drifted past some of them and hazy as a billowing dream as it floated like a ghost through others.

Ford and Arthur pounded chaotically after it, but it dodged and weaved as if following its own complex mathematical topography, which it was. Still they pursued, still it danced and span, and suddenly turned and dipped as if crossing the lip of a catastrophe graph, and they were practically on top of it. With a heave and a shout they leapt on it, the sun winked out, they fell through a sickening nothingness, and emerged unexpectedly in the middle of the pitch at Lord's Cricked Ground, St John's Wood, London, towards the end of the last Test Match of the Australian Series in the year 198-, with England needing only twenty-eight runs to win.


JSmith
 
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