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Spectrum Analyzer Recommendations

watchnerd

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#1
I'm looking for some recommendation for a standalone hardware-based (not something that needs to be plugged into a computer) spectrum analyzer suitable for analog audio.

This is entirely for hobbyist purposes.

Budget in the neighborhood of $800.
 
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KSTR

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#14
Care to elaborate a bit about what you have in mind wrt "hobbyist" measurement purposes?

A good standalone RF spectrum analyzer, or even better, a network analyzer is an extremely powerful and versatile tool. IMHO, for a (audio) circuit designer, today a RF analyzer is way more necessary and effective than a standalone audio analyzer (to 100kHz or so). With today's audio interfaces and great software like REW it is far more convenient to use a dedicated older laptop + soundcard and this close to a bare-bone hardware solution (many of which internally are a beefed-up PC running Embedded Windows anyway).
If you are really going to do to make RF measurements, be prepared that you will most certainly need some probes (notably a current clamp -- which can be DIY'ed successfully btw). And impedance-matching adapters, attenuators, an assortment of good cables, etc.
But basically, doing meaningful experiments and measurements is possible for most anyone and the learning curve is probably easier with modern tools/gear.

As very inspiring resource I can recommend Doug C. Smith's website http://www.emcesd.com/ , notably the Technical Tidbits section.
 

pma

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#16
He needs a standard audio spectrum analyzer with dynamic range at least 120 dB. The only affordable instrument is HP 3580A. He does not need a display with few bulb levels.
 

gene_stl

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#19
The Digilent is only 14 bits. You would be better served with something 24 bit like an RME and good software or a QuantAsylum.
An RME could be operated through Pete Milletts interface or Jan Didden's Linear Audio interface. It probably would be more econimical to just buy the QuantAsylum. They are on hold until AK in Japan resumes deliveries following their factory fire.
 
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watchnerd

watchnerd

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Thread Starter #20
The Digilent is only 12 bits. You would be better served with something 24 bit like an RME and good software or a QuantAsylum.
An RME could be operated through Pete Milletts interface or Jan Didden's Linear Audio interface. It probably would be more econimical to just buy the QuantAsylum. They are on hold until AK in Japan resumes deliveries following their factory fire.
I already have an RME ADI-2 Pro.

I don't want to use an ADC + software for this.

As it says in the OP:

"not something that needs to be plugged into a computer"
 

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